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QUESTION ANSWER1 ANSWER2 ANSWER3 ANSWER4
You are loading in the winter in Albany, N.Y., for a voyage to a port governed by the tropical load line mark. Which of the following statements is TRUE? (Hydrometer reading in Albany is 1.000) You may not exceed the winter load line mark when you finish loading except for the burnout to sea. The freshwater allowance and burnout to sea may be subtracted from the required freeboard in Albany. You may calculate the burnout necessary to reach the tropical zone and load extra cargo to compensate. You may load to the winter mark less the fresh water allowance if you will be at the tropical mark upon arrival in the tropical zone.
You are loading at port A, governed by the summer load line mark, for a voyage to port B, governed by the winter mark. The fresh water allowance is 10", and the hydrometer reads 1.020. Which statement is TRUE? You may not load beyond the winter mark except for 2 inches brackish water allowance. You may not load beyond the summer mark and must be at the winter mark upon arrival at port B. You may not load beyond the summer mark plus 8 inches brackish water allowance. You may load to the summer mark plus 2 inches if you will be at the winter mark when entering the winter zone.
You are loading in a port governed by the tropical load line mark for a voyage to a port governed by the winter mark. The fresh water allowance is 5 inches, and the hydrometer reads 1.005. Which statement is TRUE? You may load to the tropical mark plus 1 inch brackish water allowance. You must load so that each zone mark will not be submerged upon entering the zone. Your draft must not exceed the winter mark plus the fresh water allowance upon arrival off the discharge port. You may only load to the winter mark plus a brackish water allowance of 4 inches.
You are bound from port A governed by the summer load line mark to port B also governed by the summer mark. The great circle track will take you into a zone governed by the winter mark. Which statement is TRUE? You cannot load beyond the summer mark at port A and must be at the winter mark upon arrival at port B. You can only load to the winter mark plus any fresh water allowance and burnout to sea at port A. You must be at the winter mark when you enter the winter zone and cannot exceed the summer mark upon departing port A. You can load so that upon arrival at the pier at port B your freeboard is equal to the summer mark less any fresh water allowance.
A tanker loads at a terminal within the tropical zone. She will enter the summer zone six days after departing the loading port. She will burn off 45 tons/day and daily water consumption is 8 tons. How many tons may she load over that allowed by her summer load line? 270 278 291 318
A vessel's tropical load line is 6 in. above her summer load line. Her TPI is 127 tons. She will arrive in the summer zone 8 days after departure. She will burn off about 47 tons/day fuel and water consumption is 12 tons/day. How many tons may she load above her summer load line if she loads in the tropical zone? 376 472 762 1,016
A vessel has a maximum allowable draft of 28 feet in salt water and a fresh water allowance of 8 inches. At the loading berth, the water density is 1.011. To what draft can she load in order to be at her marks when she reaches the sea? (The salt water density is 1.025.) 27' 07.5" 27' 08.5" 28' 03.5" 28' 04.5"
Your vessel is floating in water of density 1010. The fresh water allowance is 8 inches. How far below her marks may she be loaded so as to float at her mark in saltwater of density 1025? 3.2 inches 4.8 inches 6.4 inches 8.0 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the summer load line mark and bound for a port subject to the tropical load line mark. You will enter the tropical zone after steaming four days. You will consume 33 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.006, and the average TPI is 66. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage? 78 inches 82 inches 86 inches 88 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the summer load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming two days. You will consume 28 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.020, and the average TPI is 55. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage? 62 inches 66 inches 70 inches 74 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the winter load line mark and bound for a port subject to the summer load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming six days. You will consume 32 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.005, and the average TPI is 65. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage? 93 inches 90 inches 81 inches 70 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the summer load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming four days. You will consume 41 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.000 and the average TPI is 55. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage? 55 inches 49 inches 44 inches 41 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the summer load line mark and bound for a port subject to the winter load line mark. You will enter the winter zone after steaming four days. You will consume 35 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.0083, and the average TPI is 65. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage? 74 inches 78 inches 80 inches 86 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the summer load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming ten days. You will consume 33 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.021, and the average TPI is 51. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage? 76 inches 74 inches 73 inches 72 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the winter load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming eight days, and you will enter the winter zone after a total of ten days. You will consume 31 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.016, and the average TPI is 41. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage? 72 inches 70 inches 68 inches 64 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the winter load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming four days, and you will enter the winter zone after a total of nine days. You will consume 29 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.008, and the average TPI is 53. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage? 72.5 inches 75.0 inches 77.0 inches 80.0 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the winter load line mark and bound for a port subject to the tropical load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming four days, and you will enter the tropical zone after a total of twelve days. You will consume 31 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.000, and the average TPI is 46. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage? 78 inches 74 inches 70 inches 68 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the winter load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming one day, and you will enter the winter zone after a total of eleven days. You will consume 33 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.004, and the average TPI is 46. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage? 85 inches 82 inches 80 inches 78 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the winter load line mark and bound for a port subject to the tropical load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming four days, and you will enter the tropical zone after a total of twelve days. You will consume 39 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.025, and the average TPI is 49. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage? 90 inches 87 inches 80 inches 77 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the winter load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming eleven days, and you will enter the winter zone after a total of fourteen days. You will consume 36 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.025, and the average TPI is 51. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage? 75.0 inches 76.0 inches 79.5 inches 81.0 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the winter load line mark and bound for a port subject to the tropical load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming four days, and you will enter the tropical zone after a total of seven days. You will consume 38 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.004, and the average TPI is 72. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage? 85 inches 90 inches 92 inches 94 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the winter load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming one day, and you will enter the winter zone after a total of eight days. You will consume 36 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.002, and the TPI is 47. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage? 71.0 inches 72.7 inches 79.5 inches 81.0 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the winter load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming one and one-half days, and you will enter the winter zone after a total of six days. You will consume 29 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.006, and the average TPI is 43. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage? 79.5 inches 76.5 inches 75.0 inches 72.5 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the winter load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming six days. You will enter the winter zone after an additional three days. You will consume 28 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.020, and the average TPI is 46. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage? 61.4 inches 64.5 inches 70.6 inches 77.5 inches
A tanker loads at a terminal within the tropical zone. She will enter the summer zone five days after departing the loading port. She will burn off about 45 tons/day and daily water consumption is 8 tons. How many tons may she load over that allowed by her summer load line? 225 235 245 265
Under federal regulations, what minimum level of Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) constitutes a violation of the laws prohibiting Boating Under the Influence of Alcohol (BUI) on commercial vessels? .18% BAC .10% BAC .06% BAC .04% BAC
You have approximately 6 tons of fish on deck. What will be the shift in the center of gravity after you shift the fish to the fish hold, a vertical distance of 7 feet? (total displacement is 422 tons) 0.1 foot 0.3 foot 0.5 foot 0.9 foot
You have approximately 15 tons of fish on deck. What will be the shift in the center of gravity after you shift the fish to the fish hold, a vertical distance of 8 feet? (total displacement is 300 tons) 0.1 foot 0.2 foot 0.3 foot 0.4 foot
You have approximately 29 tons of fish on deck. What will be the shift in the center of gravity after you shift the fish to the fish hold, a vertical distance of 5 feet? (total displacement is 483 tons) 0.3 foot 0.4 foot 0.5 foot 0.6 foot
You have approximately 60 tons of fish on deck. What will be the shift in the center of gravity after you shift the fish to the fish hold, a vertical distance of 8 feet? (total displacement is 960 tons) 0.6 foot 0.5 foot 0.4 foot 0.3 foot
You have approximately 16 tons of fish on deck. What will be the shift in the center of gravity after you shift the fish to the fish hold, a vertical distance of 8 feet? (total displacement is 640 tons) 0.1 foot 0.2 foot 0.3 foot 0.4 foot
You have approximately 24 tons of fish on deck. What will be the shift in the center of gravity after you shift the fish to the fish hold, a vertical distance of 8 feet? (total displacement is 540 tons) 0.14 foot 0.23 foot 0.36 foot 0.44 foot
You have approximately 34 tons of fish on deck. What will be the shift in the center of gravity after you shift the fish to the fish hold, a vertical distance of 7.5 feet? (total displacement is 638 tons) 0.1 foot 0.2 foot 0.3 foot 0.4 foot
You have approximately 14 tons of fish on deck. What will be the shift in the center of gravity after you shift the fish to the fish hold, a vertical distance of 6 feet? (total displacement is 210 tons) 0.2 foot 0.3 foot 0.4 foot 0.5 foot
A vessel's light draft displacement is 7400 tons. The center of gravity at this draft is 21.5 ft. above the keel. The following weights are loaded: (WT. #1-450 tons, VCG #1-17.4 ft.; WT. #2-220 tons, VCG #2-11.6 ft.; WT. #3-65 tons, VCG #3-7.0 ft.). The new VCG above the keel is 14.7 feet 17.8 feet 18.7 feet 20.9 feet
Your vessel displaces 479 tons. The existing deck cargo has a center of gravity of 3.0 feet above the deck and weighs 16 tons. If you load 23 tons of anchor and anchor chain with an estimated center of gravity of 9 inches above the deck, what is the final height of the CG above the deck? 0.33 foot 1.00 foot 1.45 feet 1.67 feet
Your vessel displaces 475 tons. The existing deck cargo has a center of gravity of 2.6 feet above the deck and weighs 22 tons. If you load 16 tons of ground tackle with an estimated center of gravity of 8 inches above the deck, what is the final height of the CG of the deck cargo? 1.64 feet 1.79 feet 1.96 feet 2.14 feet
Your vessel displaces 528 tons. The existing cargo has a center of gravity of 2.9 feet above the deck and weighs 28 tons. If you load 14 tons of ground tackle with an estimated center of gravity of 9 inches above the deck, what is the final height of the CG of the deck cargo? 1.76 feet 1.93 feet 2.18 feet 2.43 feet
Your vessel displaces 564 tons. The existing deck cargo has a center of gravity of 1.5 feet above the deck and weighs 41 tons. If you load 22 tons of ground tackle with an estimated center of gravity of 2.5 feet above the deck, what is the final height of the CG of the deck cargo? 1.62 feet 1.85 feet 2.10 feet 2.46 feet
Your vessel displaces 560 tons. The existing deck cargo has a center of gravity of 4.5 feet above the deck and weighs 34 tons. If you load 10 tons of ground tackle with an estimated center of gravity of 2.8 feet above the deck, what is the final height of the CG of the deck cargo? 4.11 feet 4.36 feet 4.57 feet 4.78 feet
Your vessel displaces 641 tons. The existing deck cargo has a center of gravity of 3.6 feet above the deck and weighs 36 tons. If you load 22 tons of ground tackle with an estimated center of gravity of 2.0 feet above the deck, what is the final height of the CG of the deck cargo? 2.33 feet 2.55 feet 2.77 feet 2.99 feet
Your vessel displaces 640 tons. The existing deck cargo has center of gravity of 2.3 feet above the deck and weighs 18 tons. If you load 12 tons of ground tackle with an estimated center of gravity of 21 inches above the deck, what is the final height of the CG of the deck cargo? 1.75 feet 1.94 feet 2.08 feet 2.26 feet
Your vessel displaces 497 tons. The existing deck cargo has a center of gravity of 2.5 feet above the deck and weighs 24 tons. If you load 18 tons of ground tackle with an estimated center of gravity of 18 inches above the deck, what is the final height of the CG of the deck cargo? 1.86 feet 2.07 feet 2.35 feet 2.76 feet
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. On board is the cargo listed. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 1.50 feet 1.96 feet 2.21 feet 2.78 feet
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. On board is the cargo listed. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 3.6 feet 4.2 feet 4.4 feet 4.9 feet
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. On board is the cargo listed. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 0.96 foot 1.45 feet 1.96 feet 2.96 feet
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. On board is the cargo listed. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 1.76 feet 1.97 feet 2.21 feet 2.32 feet
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. On board is the cargo listed. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 2.15 feet 1.83 feet 1.64 feet 1.19 feet
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. On board is the cargo listed. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 3.75 feet 3.02 feet 2.22 feet 0.83 foot
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. On board is the cargo listed. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 2.32 feet 2.21 feet 1.97 feet 1.76 feet
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. On board is the cargo listed. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 1.20 feet 1.64 feet 2.26 feet 3.00 feet
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. On board is the cargo listed. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 2.15 feet 2.05 feet 1.85 feet 1.52 feet
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. On board is the cargo listed. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 2.45 feet 1.95 feet 1.05 feet 0.90 foot
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. On board is the cargo listed. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 2.23 feet 1.93 feet 1.82 feet 1.38 feet
You have 8 containers of steward's supplies each measuring 6'L by 6'B by 6'H and weighing 1.5 tons each. Each container is stowed on deck. What is the maximum VCG permitted of the remaining cargo if you are carrying rig water and load to maximum capacity? (Refer to trim and stability letter for M.V. Surveyor.) 1.00 foot 1.33 feet 1.48 feet 2.00 feet
You have 38 containers of ships stores each measuring 6'L by 6'B by 5'H and weighing 0.6 ton each. Each container is stowed on deck. What is the maximum VCG permitted of the remaining cargo if you are carrying rig water and load to maximum capacity? (See illustration D037DG, stability letter for M.V. Surveyor) 0.54 foot (0.16 meter) 1.06 feet (0.32 meter) 1.35 feet (0.41 meter) 1.64 feet (0.50 meter)
You have 50 containers of ships stores each measuring 6'L by 4'B by 3'H and weighing 0.4 ton each. Each container is stowed on deck. What is the maximum VCG permitted of the remaining cargo if you are carrying rig water and load to maximum capacity? 1.50 feet 2.25 feet 2.66 feet 2.91 feet
You have 6 containers of rig supplies each measuring 8'L by 4'B by 3'H and weighing 1.6 tons each. Each container is stowed on deck. What is the maximum VCG permitted of the remaining cargo if you are carrying rig water and load to maximum capacity? 0.4 foot 0.9 foot 1.75 feet 2.18 feet
You have 12 containers of rig supplies each measuring 10'L by 4'B by 5'H and weighing 2.0 tons each. Each container is stowed on deck. What is the maximum VCG permitted of the remaining cargo if you are carrying rig water and load to maximum capacity? 0.5 foot 0.9 foot 1.1 feet 1.6 feet
You have 4 containers of rig supplies each measuring 8'L by 8'B by 8'H and weighing 1.2 tons each. Each container is stowed on deck. What is the maximum VCG permitted of the remaining cargo if you are carrying rig water and load to maximum capacity? (See illustration D037DG, stability letter for M.V. Surveyor) 1.33 feet 1.68 feet 1.96 feet 2.16 feet
You have 10 containers of rig supplies each measuring 10'L by 6'B by 6'H and weighing 1.8 tons each. Each container is stowed on deck. What is the maximum VCG permitted of the remaining cargo if you are carrying rig water and load to maximum capacity? (See illustration D037DG, stability letter for M.V. Surveyor) 0.94 foot 1.36 feet 1.78 feet 1.96 feet
You have 6 containers of ship stores each measuring 8'L by 4'B by 6'H and weighing 0.5 ton each. Each container is stowed on deck. What is the maximum VCG permitted of the remaining cargo if you are carrying rig water and load to maximum capacity? (See illustration D037DG, stability letter for M.V. Surveyor) 1.06 feet 1.32 feet 1.65 feet 1.90 feet
You have 520 tons of below deck tonnage. There is no liquid mud. If you have 160 tons of cargo above deck with a VCG above the deck of 3.2, what is the maximum allowed VCG of the remainder of the deck cargo that is permitted? 1.43 feet 2.79 feet 3.10 feet 3.64 feet
You have 640 tons of below deck tonnage. There is no liquid mud aboard. If you have 160 tons of cargo above deck with a VCG above the deck of 3.4 feet, what is the maximum allowed VCG of the remainder of the deck cargo that is permitted? (see illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson) 1.24 feet 1.65 feet 1.98 feet 2.46 feet
You have 600 tons of below deck tonnage. There is no liquid mud aboard. If you have 150 tons of cargo above deck with a VCG above the deck of 2.8 feet, what is the maximum allowed VCG of the remainder of the deck cargo that is permitted? (See illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson) 1.96 feet 2.25 feet 3.20 feet 3.55 feet
You have 400 tons of below deck tonnage. There is no liquid mud aboard. If you have 225 tons of cargo above deck with a VCG above the deck of 3.4 feet, what is the maximum allowed VCG of the remainder of the deck cargo that is permitted? 1.96 feet 2.28 feet 2.65 feet 2.93 feet
You have 710 tons of below deck tonnage. There is no liquid mud aboard. If you have 150 tons of cargo above deck with a VCG above the deck of 3.1 feet, what is the maximum allowed VCG of the remainder of the deck cargo that is permitted? (See illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson) 1.84 feet 2.13 feet 2.43 feet 2.78 feet
You have 200 tons of below deck tonnage. There is no liquid mud aboard. If you have 140 tons of cargo above deck with a VCG above the deck of 4.2 feet, what is the maximum allowed VCG of the remainder of the deck cargo that is permitted? 0.56 foot 0.87 foot 1.04 feet 2.44 feet
You have 590 tons of below deck tonnage. There is no liquid mud aboard. If you have 84 tons of cargo above deck with a VCG above the deck of 2.7 feet, what is the maximum allowed VCG of the remainder of the deck cargo that is permitted? (See illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson) 2.54 feet 2.85 feet 3.11 feet 3.55 feet
You have 240 tons of below deck tonnage. There is no liquid mud aboard. If you have 360 tons of cargo above deck with a VCG above the deck of 2.9 feet, what is the maximum allowed VCG of the remainder of the deck cargo that is permitted? (See illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson) 1.35 feet 1.86 feet 2.56 feet 3.60 feet
What is the definition of transverse metacenter? The distance between the actual center of gravity and the maximum center of gravity that will still allow a positive stability. The point to which G may rise and still permit the vessel to possess positive stability. The sum of the center of buoyancy and the center of gravity. The transverse shift of the center of buoyancy as a vessel rolls.
The point to which your vessel's center of gravity (G) may rise and still permit the vessel to have positive stability is called the . metacentric point metacenter metacentric radius tipping center
If the vertical center of gravity (VCG) of a ship rises, the righting arm (GZ) for the various angles of inclination will decrease increase remain unchanged be changed by the amount of GG' x cosine of the angle
Transverse stability calculations require the use of . hog or sag calculations or tables hydrostatic curves general arrangement plans cross-sectional views of the vessel
A vessel's KG is determined by dividing the total longitudinal moment summation by displacement dividing the total vertical moment summation by displacement multiplying the MT1 by the longitudinal moments subtracting LCF from LCB
What is not usually a concern when loading a single-hulled tanker? Bending moments Initial stability Draft Trim
Your vessel rolls slowly and sluggishly. This indicates that the vessel . has off-center weights is taking on water has a greater draft forward than aft has poor stability
Which will improve stability? Closing watertight doors Pumping the bilges Loading cargo on deck Consuming fuel from a full tank
A negative metacentric height will always cause a vessel to capsize should always be immediately corrected always results from off-center weights All of the above are correct
A negative metacentric height will always cause a vessel to capsize always results from off-center weights should always be immediately corrected All of the above are correct
A negative metacentric height should always be immediately corrected will always cause a vessel to capsize always results from off-center weights All of the above are correct
What represents the center of gravity? GZ M B G
What represents the metacentric height? M GM BM GZ
When a vessel is floating upright, the distance from the keel to the metacenter is called the . metacentric radius height of the baseline height of the metacenter righting arm
Refer to the illustration D001SA. Which represents the righting arm? GM GZ BM Angle MGZ
When a vessel has positive stability, the distance between the line of force through B and the line of force through G is called the . metacentric height righting arm righting moment metacentric radius
The righting moment can be determined by multiplying the displacement by the . vertical center of gravity (KG) longitudinal center of gravity (LCG) righting arm (GZ) center of gravity (CG)
In small-angle stability, when external forces exist, the buoyant force is assumed to act vertically upwards through the center of buoyancy and through the . center of gravity center of flotation metacenter metacentric height
GM cannot be used as an indicator of stability at all angles of inclination because . M is not fixed at large angles there is no M at large angles G is not fixed at large angles there is no G at large angles
In small angle stability theory, the metacenter is located at the intersection of the inclined vertical centerline and a vertical line through G F B K
For a vessel inclined by the wind, multiplying the buoyant force by the horizontal distance between the lines of action of the buoyant and gravity forces gives the . righting moment vertical moment longitudinal moment transverse moment
The horizontal distance between the vertical lines of action of gravity and the buoyant forces is called the righting arm metacentric height metacentric radius height of the center of buoyancy
A vessel behaves as if all of its weight is acting downward through the center of gravity, and all its support is acting upward through the . keel center of buoyancy tipping center amidships section
The value of the maximum righting arm depends on the position of the center of buoyancy and the longitudinal center of gravity transverse center of gravity downflooding angle vertical location of the center of gravity
A floating vessel will behave as if all of its weight is acting downward through the . center of gravity center of buoyancy center of flotation metacenter
For a given displacement, the righting arm has its maximum value when KG is minimum angle of inclination is a maximum small-angle stability applies KM is a minimum
The water in which a vessel floats provides vertical upward support. The point through which this support is assumed to act is known as the center of . effort flotation gravity buoyancy
When a wind force causes a vessel to heel to a static angle, the centers of buoyancy and gravity are in the same vertical line righting moment equals the windheeling moment center of buoyancy remains the same deck-edge immersion occurs
In the absence of external forces, the center of gravity of a floating vessel is located directly in line with the metacenter amidships center of flotation geometric center of the displaced volume
At all angles of inclination, the metacenter is . vertically above the center of buoyancy vertically above the center of gravity at the intersection of the upright vertical centerline and the line of action of the buoyant force at the geometric center of the underwater volume
A vertical shift of weight to a position above the vessel's center of gravity will . increase reserve buoyancy decrease the righting moments decrease KG increase KM
When making a turn (course change) on most merchant ships, the vessel will heel outwards if . the vessel has very little draft G is above the center of lateral resistance G is below the center of lateral resistance the vessel is deeply laden
Which statement is TRUE of a stiff vessel? She will have a large metacentric height. Her period of roll will be large due to her large metacentric height. She will have an unusually high center of gravity. She will pitch heavily.
A vessel would be referred to as "tender" when the weight of the cargo is . evenly distributed vertically and the double bottoms are full concentrated low and the double bottoms are empty concentrated low and the double bottoms are full concentrated high and the double bottoms are empty
In order to minimize the effects of a tender vessel, when carrying a cargo of lumber, you should . maximize your deck load distribute lumber so that those stowing most compactly per unit of weight are in the upper holds place the heaviest woods in the lower holds keep the vessel's frame spaces free from lumber
Which is TRUE of a "stiff" vessel? It has a small GM. It pitches heavily. It has an unusually high center of gravity. Its period of roll is short.
Which technique could be used to give a more comfortable roll to a stiff vessel? Concentrate weights on upper decks Add weight near the centerline of the lower hold Move weights lower in the ship Ballast the peak tanks
Which statement is TRUE of a tender vessel? It has a large GM. Its period of roll is long. It has a very low center of gravity. It has a good transverse stability.
A vessel with a large GM will have more resistance to listing in case of damage have less tendency to have synchronous rolling be less likely to have cargo shift ride more comfortably
A vessel with a small GM will have a large amplitude of roll provide a comfortable ride for the crew and passengers have drier decks in heavy weather be likely to have cargo shift in heavy weather
A vessel with a large GM will have a small amplitude of roll in heavy weather tend to ship water on deck in heavy weather be subject to severe racking stresses be less likely to have cargo shift
A vessel with a small GM will be more subject to synchronous rolling have a short rolling period provide an uncomfortable ride for personnel have a smaller amplitude of roll in heavy weather
A quick and rapid motion of a vessel in a seaway is an indication of a(n) large GM high center of gravity excessive free surface small GZ
A slow and easy motion of a vessel in a seaway is an indication of a small GM low center of gravity stiff vessel large GZ
Vessels "A" and "B" are identical; however, "A" is more tender than "B". This means that "A" relative to "B" has a . lower KG smaller GM larger roll angle larger GZ
Metacentric height is an indication of a vessel's stability . for all angles of inclination for large angles of inclination for small angles of inclination in no case
Metacentric height is a measure of initial stability only stability through all angles maximum righting arm All of the above
Initial stability refers to stability at small angles of inclination when loaded with minimum deck load when at transit draft when GZ is zero
What is used as an indicator of initial stability? GM KG KM GZ
Initial stability is indicated by GM KM Deck load Maximum allowed KG
What is the stability term for the distance from the center of gravity (G) to the Metacenter (M), when small-angle stability applies? metacentric height metacentric radius height of the metacenter righting arm
Initial stability of a vessel may be improved by . removing loose water adding weight low in the vessel closing crossover valves between partly filled double bottom tanks All of the above
Addition of weight to a vessel will ALWAYS . reduce reserve buoyancy increase righting moments increase GM All of the above
Which will be a result of removing on-deck containers? KG will increase Metacentric height will increase KB will increase Reserve buoyancy will decrease
Addition of weight above the center of gravity of a vessel will ALWAYS reduce initial stability increase righting moments increase GM All of the above
When cargo is shifted from the lower hold to the main deck the center of gravity will move upwards GM will increase center of buoyancy will move downward All of the above
What will happen when cargo is shifted from the main deck into the lower hold of a vessel? The GM will increase. The metacenter will move upward. The center of buoyancy will move upward. All of the above
You must shift a weight from the upper 'tween deck to the lower hold. This shift will . make the vessel more tender make the vessel stiffer increase the rolling period decrease the metacentric height
Deballasting a double bottom has what affect on KG? KG is increased. KG is decreased. KG is not affected. KG increases at light drafts and decreases at deep drafts.
Which action will best increase the transverse stability of a merchant vessel at sea? Ballasting the double bottom tanks Deballasting the deep tanks Positioning a heavy lift cargo on the main deck Raising the cargo booms to the upright position
What will NOT decrease the stability of a vessel? Topside icing Running with a following sea Using 35% of the fuel in a full tank Lowering a weight suspended by a boom onto the deck
The principal danger from ice collecting on a vessel is the decrease in capabilities of radar decrease in displacement adverse effect on trim loss of stability
Which of the following describes why topside icing, which is usually off-center, decreases vessel stability? increases displacement it increases the height of the center of gravity it increases draft reduces the pocketing of free surface
Topside icing that blocks freeing ports and scuppers . is usually below the center of gravity and has little effect on stability will cause water on deck to pocket and increase stability may decrease stability by increasing free surface effect due to water on deck increases the effective freeboard and increases the wind-heel affect
Topside icing decreases vessel stability because it increases displacement free surface draft KG
The upward pressure of displaced water is called . buoyancy deadweight draft freeboard
Aboard a vessel, dividing the sum of the vertical moments by the total weight yields the vessel's height of the center of gravity vertical moments righting moments inclining moments
On a vessel, multiplying a load's weight by the distance of the load's center of gravity above the baseline results in a(n) . transverse moment vertical moment righting moment inclining moment
Which formula can be used to calculate metacentric height? KM + GM KM - GM KM - KG KB + BM
The difference between the height of the metacenter and the metacentric height is known as . righting arm metacentric radius height of the center of buoyancy height of the center of gravity
In small angle stability, the metacentric height . is found in the hydrostatic tables for a level vessel multiplied by the displacement yields the righting moment is always positive is calculated by subtracting KG from KM
Subtracting GM from KM yields BL GM FS KG
Subtracting KG from KM yields BM GM GZ KG
The important initial stability parameter, GM, is the . metacentric height height of the metacenter above the keel height of the center of buoyancy above the keel height of the center of gravity above the keel
The important stability parameter, KG, is defined as the . metacentric height height of the metacenter above the keel height of the center of buoyancy above the keel height of the center of gravity above the keel
For a floating vessel, the result of subtracting KG from KM is the height of the metacenter height of the righting arm height of the center of buoyancy metacentric height
What abbreviation represents the height of the center of buoyancy? BK KB CB BM
The abbreviation GM is used to represent the . height of the metacenter righting arm righting moment metacentric height
The magnitude of a moment is the product of the force and . time lever arm displacement angle of inclination
The difference between the height of the metacenter and the height of the center of gravity is known as the metacentric height height of the righting arm fore and aft perpendicular height of the center of buoyancy
When initial stability applies, the height of the center of gravity plus the metacentric height equals the free surface moments righting arm height of the metacenter corrected height of the center of gravity
The difference between the height of the metacenter and the height of the center of gravity is . KB KG KM GM
Longitudinal moment is obtained by multiplying a vessel's weight and its VCG or KG LCB LCG TCG
Vertical moment is obtained by multiplying a vessel's weight and its VCG or KG LCB LCG TCG
The KG of a vessel is found by dividing the displacement into the height of the center of gravity of the vessel sum of the vertical moments of the vessel sum of the free surface moments of the vessel sum of the longitudinal moments of the vessel
The LCG of a vessel may be found by dividing displacement into the longitudinal center of gravity of the vessel sum of the vertical moments of the vessel sum of the longitudinal moments of the vessel longitudinal baseline of the vessel
If the result of loading a vessel is an increase in the height of the center of gravity, there will always be an increase in the . metacentric height righting arm righting moment vertical moments
Stability is determined by the relationship of the center of gravity and the . water depth keel center of flotation center of buoyancy
Stability is determined principally by the location of the center of gravity and the . aft perpendicular center of buoyancy keel center of flotation
Stability is determined principally by the location of two points in a vessel: the center of buoyancy and the metacenter geometric center of the water plane area center of gravity center of flotation
Stability is determined principally by the location of the point of application of two forces: the downward-acting gravity force and the . upward-acting weight force downward-acting weight force upward-acting buoyant force environmental force
Stability is determined principally by the location of the point of application of two forces: the upward-acting buoyant force and the . upward-acting weight force downward-acting weight force downward-acting buoyant force environmental force
When a vessel is inclined at a small angle the center of buoyancy will remain stationary move toward the low side move toward the high side move to the height of the metacenter
The geometric center of the underwater volume is known as the center of flotation tipping center center of gravity center of buoyancy
The center of buoyancy is located at the . geometric center of the water plane area intersection of the vertical centerline and line of action of the buoyant force center of gravity of the vessel corrected for free surface effects geometric center of the displaced volume
The geometric center of the underwater volume of a floating vessel is the center of . hydrodynamic forces flotation gravity buoyancy
When positive stability exists, GZ represents the . righting moment center of gravity righting arm metacentric height
At all angles of inclination, the true measure of a vessel's stability is the metacentric height displacement righting moment inclining moment
The center of buoyancy and the metacenter are in the line of action of the buoyant force . only when there is positive stability only when there is negative stability only when there is neutral stability at all times
The vertical distance between G and M is used as a measure of stability at all angles of inclination initial stability stability at angles less than the limit of positive stability stability at angles less than the downflooding angle
The weight of the liquid displaced by a vessel floating in sea water is equal to the . weight required to sink the vessel total weight of the vessel displaced volume reserve buoyancy
The original equilibrium position is always unstable when . metacentric height is negative KM is higher than KG KG exceeds maximum allowable limits free surfaces are excessive
An unstable upright equilibrium position on a vessel means that the metacenter is . lower than the center of gravity at the same height as the center of gravity higher than the baseline on the longitudinal centerline
A neutral equilibrium position for a vessel means that the metacenter is lower than the keel at the same height as the center of gravity exactly at midships at the center of the water plane area
When the height of the metacenter is less than the height of the center of gravity, a vessel has which type of stability? Stable Neutral Unstable Positive
When the height of the metacenter is the same as the height of the center of gravity, the upright equilibrium position is . stable neutral unstable negative
When the height of the metacenter is greater than the height of the center of gravity a vessel has which type of stability? Stable Neutral Unstable Negative
When the height of the metacenter is less than the height of the center of gravity, a vessel has which type of stability? Stable Neutral Negative Positive
When the height of the metacenter is greater than the height of the center of gravity, the upright equilibrium position is stable and stability is . unstable neutral negative positive
Unstable equilibrium exists at small angles of inclination when G is above M G is off the centerline B is off the centerline B is above G
When stability of a vessel is neutral, the value of GM . only depends on the height of the center of gravity only depends on the height of the metacenter is greater when G is low is zero
When the height of the metacenter is less than the height of the center of gravity of a vessel, the upright equilibrium position is . stable neutral unstable positive
When the height of the metacenter is the same as the height of the center of gravity of a vessel, the upright equilibrium position is . stable neutral unstable negative
Stable equilibrium for a vessel means that the metacenter is . at a lower level than the baseline on the longitudinal centerline higher than the center of gravity at amidships
When the height of the metacenter is greater than the height of the center of gravity, a vessel is in . stable equilibrium neutral equilibrium unstable equilibrium negative equilibrium
For small angles of inclination, if the KG were equal to the KM, then the vessel would have . positive stability negative stability neutral stability maximum stability
The original equilibrium position is stable when . metacentric height is positive metacentric radius is positive KG exceeds maximum allowable limits free surfaces are excessive
At an angle of loll, the capsizing moment is . maximum negative positive zero
At an angle of loll, the righting moment is . maximum negative positive zero
At an angle of loll, the righting arm (GZ) is . maximum negative positive, but reflexive zero
The value of the righting arm at an angle of loll is . negative zero positive equal to GM
When inclined to an angle of list, the value of the righting arm is negative zero positive maximum
The moment created by a force of 12,000 tons and a moment arm of 0.25 foot is . 48,000 ft-tons 6,000 ft-tons 3,000 ft-tons 0 ft-tons
A moment of 300 ft-tons is created by a force of 15,000 tons. What is the moment arm? 50.00 feet 25.00 feet 0.04 foot 0.02 foot
The angle of maximum righting arm corresponds approximately to the angle of . deck edge immersion the load line downflooding loll
If the metacentric height is small, a vessel will . be tender have a quick and rapid motion be stiff have large angles of roll
If the metacentric height is large, a vessel will . be tender have a slow and easy motion be stiff have a tendency to yaw
Movement of liquid in a tank when a vessel inclines causes an increase in righting arm metacentric height metacentric radius natural rolling period
A partially full tank causes a virtual rise in the height of the . metacenter center of buoyancy center of flotation center of gravity
A virtual rise in the center of gravity may be caused by . filling a partially filled tank using an on board crane to lift a freely swinging heavy object emptying a partially filled tank transferring ballast from the forepeak to the after peak
A virtual rise in the center of gravity may be caused by . filling a partially filled tank using fuel from a pressed fuel tank emptying a partially filled tank transferring ballast from the forepeak to the after peak
When the height of the metacenter is the same as the height of the center of gravity, the metacentric height is equal to . the height of the metacenter the height of the center of gravity half the height of the metacenter zero
You are on a vessel that has a metacentric height of 4 feet, and a beam of 50 feet. What can you expect the rolling period of the vessel to be? 10.0 seconds 10.5 seconds 11.0 seconds 11.5 seconds
If your vessel has a GM of one foot and a breadth of 50 feet, what is your vessel's estimated rolling period? 11 seconds 15 seconds 20 seconds 22 seconds
Your vessel has a metacentric height of 1.12 feet and a beam of 60 feet. Your average rolling period will be 20 seconds 23 seconds 25 seconds 35 seconds
You are on a vessel that has a metacentric height of 1.0 foot and a beam of 40 feet. What can you expect the rolling period of the vessel to be? 15.2 seconds 15.9 seconds 17.0 seconds 17.6 seconds
Your vessel has a displacement of 19,800 tons. It is 464 feet long, and has a beam of 64 feet. You have timed its rolling period to be 21.0 seconds in still water. What is your vessel's approximate GM? 1.1 ft 1.3 ft 1.6 ft 1.8 ft
You are at sea on a vessel that has a beam of 50 feet, and you calculate the period of roll to be 22 seconds. What is the vessel's metacentric height? 0.8 ft 1.0 ft 1.2 ft 1.4 ft
Your vessel's has a beam of 60 feet, and you observe a still water rolling period of 25 seconds. What is the vessel's metacentric height? 0.8 ft 1.1 ft 1.4 ft 1.6 ft
Your vessel's has a beam of 40 feet, and you observe a still water rolling period of 20 seconds. What is the vessel's metacentric height? 0.3 ft. 0.5 ft. 0.8 ft. 1.1 ft.
You are loading cargo on deck aboard a vessel whose beam is 60 feet and full period of roll is 20 seconds. What is the estimated metacentric height of the vessel? 1.3 ft 1.5 ft 1.7 ft 1.9 ft
Your vessel has a displacement of 10,000 tons. It is 350 feet long and has a beam of 55 feet. You have timed its rolling period to be 15.0 seconds. What is your vessel's approximate GM? 1.18 feet 1.83 feet 2.60 feet 3.36 feet
Your vessel has a displacement of 24,500 tons. It is 529 feet long and has a beam of 71 feet. You have timed your vessel's rolling period to be 25.0 seconds. What is your vessel's approximate GM? 1.25 feet 1.56 feet 1.98 feet 2.43 feet
Your vessel measures 125 feet long by 17 feet in beam. If the natural rolling period at a draft of 7'-09" is 6 seconds, what is the GM? 0.95 foot 1.25 feet 1.55 feet 1.78 feet
Your vessel measures 128 feet long by 21 feet in beam. If the natural rolling period at a draft of 7'-06" is 6 seconds, what is the GM? 1.56 feet 2.37 feet 2.55 feet 2.74 feet
Your vessel measures 119 feet long by 17 feet in beam. If the natural rolling period at a draft of 5'-05" is 6 seconds, what is the GM? 1.14 feet 1.36 feet 1.55 feet 1.96 feet
Your vessel measures 114 feet long by 16 feet in beam. If the natural rolling period at a draft of 5'-06" is 6 seconds, what is the GM? 1.38 feet 1.53 feet 1.76 feet 1.98 feet
Your vessel measures 127 feet long by 17 feet in beam. If the natural rolling period at a draft of 7'-10" is 5 seconds, what is the GM? 1.96 feet 2.24 feet 2.45 feet 2.68 feet
Your vessel measures 131 feet long by 20 feet in beam. If the natural rolling period at a draft of 8'-03" is 6 seconds, what is the GM? 1.26 feet 1.74 feet 1.93 feet 2.15 feet
Your vessel measures 126 feet (38.41 meters) long by 21 feet (6.4 meters) in beam. If the natural rolling period at a draft of 8 feet (2.44 meters) is 6 seconds, what is the GM? 2.4 feet (0.70 meters) 2.8 feet (0.85 meters) 3.0 feet (0.90 meters) 3.2 feet (0.98 meters)
Your vessel measures 122 feet long by 18 feet in beam. If the natural rolling period at a draft of 6'-09" is 5 seconds, what is the GM? 1.4 feet 2.1 feet 2.5 feet 2.9 feet
On a vessel of 8,000 tons displacement, compute the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface in a hold having free water in the tank tops. The hold is 40 feet long and 20 feet wide. The reduction in metacentric height is . 0.1 ft 0.3 ft 0.5 ft 0.9 ft
On a vessel displacing 8,000 tons, what is the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface when a tank 45 feet long and 45 feet wide is partly filled with salt water? 1.22 feet 1.16 feet 1.13 feet 1.10 feet
On a vessel of 12,000 tons displacement, a tank 60 feet long, 50 feet wide, and 20 feet deep is half filled with fresh water (SG 1.000) while the vessel is floating in saltwater (SG 1.026) What is the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface? 0.97 ft. 1.01 ft. 1.35 ft. 1.44 ft.
On a vessel of 15,000 tons displacement, compute the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface in a hold having free water in the tank tops. The hold is 50 feet long and 60 feet wide. The reduction in metacentric height is . 1.54 feet 1.59 feet 1.63 feet 1.71 feet
A vessel has a cargo hold divided by a shaft alley into two tanks, each 35 feet long and 20 feet wide. Each tank is half filled with sea water. The vessel displaces 5,000 tons. The reduction in GM due to free surface effect is .27 foot .30 foot .31 foot .33 foot
On a vessel of 9,000 tons displacement, compute the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface in a hold having free water on the tank tops. The hold is 20 feet long and 30 feet wide. The reduction in metacentric height is . .09 feet .12 feet .14 feet .16 feet
What is the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface when a tank 60 feet long and 30 feet wide is partially filled with salt water, and is fitted with a centerline bulkhead? (The vessel has a displacement of 10,000 tons.) 0.1 foot 0.8 foot 1.0 foot 1.2 feet
A cargo vessel of 9,000 tons displacement is carrying a slack deep tank of molasses (SG 1.4). The tank measures 20 feet long and 30 feet wide. What will be the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface, with the vessel floating in sea water (SG 1.026)? .142 ft. .177 ft. .195 ft. .212 ft.
On a vessel of 9,000 tons displacement there are two slack deep tanks of palm oil (SG .86). Each tank is 40 feet long and 30 feet wide. What is the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface with the vessel in sea water (SG 1.025)? .27 ft .48 ft .57 ft .74 ft
On a vessel of 5,000 tons displacement there are two slack tanks of acid (SG 1.8). Each tank is 30 feet long and 20 feet wide. What is the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface with the vessel in sea water (SG 1.025)? .11 ft .21 ft .40 ft .82 ft
On a vessel of 6,000 tons displacement there are two slack tanks of carbon tetrachloride (SG 1.6). Each tank is 40 feet long and 25 feet wide. What is the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface with the vessel in sea water (SG 1.025)? .39 ft .77 ft .88 ft .95 ft
On a vessel of 12,000 tons displacement, what is the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface when a tank 60 feet long and 60 feet wide is partially filled with water? 2.30 feet 2.43 feet 2.48 feet 2.57 feet
On a vessel of 10,000 tons displacement, compute the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface in a hold having free water on tank tops. The hold is 50 feet long and 50 feet wide. The reduction in metacentric height is . 1.2 feet 1.1 feet 1.3 feet 1.5 feet
A shaft alley divides a vessel's cargo hold into two tanks, each 20 ft. wide by 60 ft. long. Each tank is filled with saltwater below the level of the shaft alley. The vessel's displacement is 7,000 tons. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface effect? .29 feet .33 feet .38 feet .42 feet
A shaft alley divides a vessel's cargo hold into two tanks, each 25 ft. wide by 50 ft. long. Each tank is filled with salt water below the level of the shaft alley. The vessel's displacement is 6,000 tons. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface effect? .56 foot .58 foot .62 foot .66 foot
A vessel carries three slack tanks of gasoline (SG .68). The vessel's displacement is 8,000 tons. Each tank is 50 ft. long and 20 ft. wide. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface with the vessel floating in sea water (SG 1.026)? .20 feet .24 feet .28 feet .30 feet
What is the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface when a tank 60 ft. wide and 60 ft. long is partially filled with saltwater? (The vessel's displacement is 10,000 tons.) 3.00 feet 3.09 feet 3.15 feet 3.20 feet
A 7,000 ton displacement tankship carries two slack tanks of alcohol with a S.G. of 0.8. Each tank is 50 ft. long and 30 ft. wide. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface with the vessel floating in sea water, S.G. is 1.026? .36 ft .46 ft .72 ft .82 ft
Determine the free surface correction for a fuel oil tank 30 ft. long by 40 ft. wide by 15 ft. deep, with a free surface constant of 3794. The vessel is displacing 7,000 tons in saltwater. 0.35 foot 0.54 foot 0.65 foot 1.38 feet
A vessel has a strong wind on the port beam. This has the same effect on stability as . weight that is off-center to starboard increasing the draft reducing the freeboard increasing the trim
On a vessel of 10,000 tons displacement, compute the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface in a hold having free water on the tank top. The hold is 40 feet long and 50 feet wide. The reduction in metacentric height is . 1.1 feet 1.2 feet 1.3 feet 1.5 feet
The liquid mud tanks on your vessel measure 20'L by 18'B by 7'D. The vessel's displacement is 986 T and the specific gravity of the mud is 1.6. What is the reduction in GM due to 2 of these tanks being slack? .09 foot .45 foot .88 foot 1.35 feet
The liquid mud tanks on your vessel measure 32'L by 15'B by 8'D. The vessel's displacement is 640 tons and the specific gravity of the mud is 1.8. What is the reduction in GM due to 2 of these tanks being slack? 0.74 foot 1.24 feet 1.41 feet 1.66 feet
The liquid mud tanks on your vessel measure 40'L by 20'B by 8'D. The vessel's displacement is 996 T and the specific gravity of the mud is 1.7. What is the reduction in GM due to 2 of these tanks being slack? 0.95 foot 1.26 feet 2.10 feet 2.54 feet
The liquid mud tanks on your vessel measure 22'L by 16'B by 7'D. The vessel's displacement is 568 T and the specific gravity of the mud is 1.6. What is the reduction in GM due to 2 of these tanks being slack? 0.56 foot 0.96 foot 1.18 feet 1.43 feet
The liquid mud tanks on your vessel measure 20'L by 18'B by 7'D. The vessel's displacement is 866 T and the specific gravity of the mud is 1.8. What is the reduction in GM due to 2 of these tanks being slack? 0.24 foot 0.56 foot 0.95 foot 1.12 feet
The liquid mud tanks on your vessel measure 18'L by 10'B by 6'D. The vessel's displacement is 944 T and the specific gravity of the mud is 1.9. What is the reduction in GM due to 2 of the tanks being slack? .08 foot .16 foot .45 foot .90 foot
The liquid mud tanks on your vessel measure 30'L by 15'B by 6'D. The vessel's displacement is 968 T and the specific gravity of the mud is 1.8. What is the reduction in GM due to 2 of these tanks being slack? .19 foot .42 foot .64 foot .87 foot
The liquid mud tanks on your vessel measure 24'L by 16'B by 8'D. The vessel's displacement in salt water (specific gravity 1.025) is 864 T and the specific gravity of the mud is 1.47. What is the reduction in GM due to 2 of these tanks being slack? 0.32 foot 0.78 foot 0.96 foot 1.12 feet
Your vessel displaces 689 tons and measures 123'L x 31'B. You ship a large wave on the after deck which measures 65'Lx 31'B. The weight of the water is estimated at 62 tons. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface before the water drains overboard? 5.51 feet 5.67 feet 5.89 feet 6.14 feet
Your vessel displaces 869 tons and measures 136'L x33'B. You ship a large wave on the after deck which measures 52'Lx 33'B. The weight of the water is estimated at 52.8 tons. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface before the water drains overboard? 4.83 feet 5.12 feet 5.46 feet 5.85 feet
Your vessel displaces 968 tons and measures 158'L x 40'B. You ship a large wave on the after deck. What is the reduction to GM due to free surface before the water drains overboard, if the after deck measures 65'L x 40'B and the weight of the water is 80 tons? 9.14 feet 9.45 feet 9.68 feet 9.87 feet
Your vessel displaces 477 tons and measures 116'L x 31'B. You ship a large wave on the after deck. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface before the water drains overboard, if the after deck measures 54'L x 31'B and the weight of the water is 51.5 tons? 6.43 feet 6.75 feet 6.99 feet 7.25 feet
Your vessel displaces 368 tons and measures 96'L x 28'B. You ship a large wave on the after deck. What is the reduction to GM due to free surface before the water drains overboard, if the after deck measures 42'L x 28'B and the weight of the water is 36 tons? 4.98 feet 5.21 feet 5.43 feet 5.67 feet
Your vessel displaces 562 tons and measures 121'L x 29'B. You ship a large wave on the after deck. What is the reduction to GM due to free surface before the water drains overboard, if the after deck measures 46'L x 29'B and the weight of the water is 41 tons? 4.43 feet 4.61 feet 4.86 feet 5.12 feet
Your vessel displaces 840 tons and measures 146'L x 38'B. You ship a large wave on the after deck. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface before the water drains overboard, if the after deck measures 65'L x 38'B and the weight of the water is 76 tons? 8.76 feet 8.93 feet 9.04 feet 9.27 feet
Your vessel displaces 747 tons and measures 136'L by 34'B. You ship a large wave on the after deck. What is the reduction to GM due to free surface before the water drains overboard, if the after deck measures 56'L x 34'B and the weight of the water is 58.6 tons? 6.04 feet 6.23 feet 6.51 feet 6.76 feet
Your vessel displaces 684 tons and measures 132'L by 31'B. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface if the fish hold (32'L by 29'B by 9'D) is filled with 2 feet of water? (Each foot of water weighs 26.5 tons) 2.17 feet 2.32 feet 2.52 feet 3.01 feet
Your vessel displaces 585 tons and measures 128'L by 26'B. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface if the fish hold (30'L by 18'B by 9'D) is filled with 2.8 feet of water? (Each foot of water weighs 15.4 tons) 0.66 foot 1.12 feet 1.37 feet 1.58 feet
Your vessel displaces 930 tons and measures 156'L by 38'B. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface if the fish hold (46'L by 28'B by 8'D) is filled with 1.5 feet of water? (Each foot of water weighs 36.8 tons) 2.16 feet 2.44 feet 2.75 feet 2.99 feet
Your vessel displaces 750 tons and measures 151'L by 35'B. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface if the fish hold (60'L by 31'B by 10'D) is filled with 3.5 feet of water? (Each foot of water weighs 53.1 tons) 4.14 feet 4.38 feet 4.55 feet 4.94 feet
Your vessel displaces 728 tons and measures 138'L by 31'B. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface if the fish hold (36'L by 29'B by 9'D) is filled with 3.6 feet of water? (Each foot of water weighs 29.8 tons) 2.35 feet 2.50 feet 2.72 feet 2.96 feet
Your vessel displaces 645 tons and measures 132'L by 34'B. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface if the fish hold (30'L by 26'B by 8'D) is filled with 3.0 feet of water? (Each foot of water weighs 22.3 tons) 1.76 feet 1.94 feet 2.10 feet 2.44 feet
Your vessel displaces 740 tons and measures 141'L by 34'B. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface if the fish hold (41'L by 30'B by 9'D) is filled with 2.5 feet of water? (Each foot of water weighs 35.1 tons) 2.14 feet 2.75 feet 2.96 feet 3.18 feet
Your vessel displaces 696 tons and measures 135'L by 34'B. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface if the fish hold (32'L by 29'B by 9'D) is filled with 2.0 feet of water? (Each foot of water weighs 26.5 tons) 1.96 feet 2.04 feet 2.25 feet 2.48 feet
The liquid mud tanks on your vessel measure 24'L by 16'B by 8'D. The vessel's displacement in fresh water is 864 tons and the specific gravity of the mud is 1.47. What is the reduction in GM due to 2 of these tanks being slack? .32 foot .80 foot .96 foot 1.12 feet
On a vessel of 12,500 tons displacement, compute the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface in a hold having free water on the tank top. The hold is 35 feet long and 50 feet wide. The reduction in metacentric height is . .14 ft .45 ft .55 ft .83 ft
Determine the free surface constant for a fuel oil tank 30 ft. long by 40 ft. wide by 15 ft. deep. The specific gravity of the fuel oil is .85 and the ship is floating in saltwater (S.G. 1.026). .83 42.7 3,787 4,571
On a vessel of 34,000 tons displacement, a tank 80 ft. long, 60 ft. wide and 30 ft. deep is half filled with fresh water (SG 1.000) while the vessel is floating in saltwater (SG 1.026). What is the free surface constant for this tank? 2,661 2,819 40,100 42,213
On a vessel of 6500 tons displacement, a tank 30 ft. long, 32 ft. wide and 15 ft. deep is half filled with oil cargo (S.G. 0.948) while the vessel is floating in saltwater (S.G. 1.026). What is the free surface constant for this tank? 3,240 2,731 2,162 1,336
On a vessel of 7000 tons displacement, a tank 35 ft. long, 30 ft. wide and 46 ft. deep is half filled with liquid cargo (S.G. 0.923) while the vessel is floating in saltwater (S.G. 1.026). What is the free surface constant for this tank? 3,240 2,731 2,390 2,024
On a vessel of 6500 tons displacement, a tank 30 ft. long, 32 ft. wide and 18 ft. deep is half filled with liquid cargo (S.G. 1.048) while the vessel is floating in saltwater (S.G. 1.026). What is the free surface constant for this tank? 1,152 1,336 2,390 2,731
On a vessel of 6500 tons displacement, a tank 35 ft. long, 25 ft. wide, and 8 ft. deep is half filled with liquid cargo (S.G. 1.053) while the vessel is floating in saltwater (S.G. 1.026). What is the free surface constant for this tank? 1,152 1,336 1,371 16,036
On a vessel of 7000 tons displacement, a tank 35 ft. long, 30 ft. wide and 4 ft. deep is half filled with fuel oil (S.G. 0.962) while the vessel is floating in saltwater (S.G. 1.026). What is the free surface constant for this tank? 2,109 25,974 31,328 909,090
As the displacement of a vessel increases, the detrimental effect of free surface . increases decreases remains the same may increase or decrease depending on the fineness of the vessel's form
When displacement increases, the free surface corrections for slack tanks . increase decrease are directly proportional remain unchanged
When displacement increases, the free surface moments of slack tanks increase decrease are inversely proportional remain unchanged
A tank 36 ft. by 36 ft. by 6 ft. is filled with water to a depth of 5 ft. If a bulkhead is placed in the center of the tank running fore-and-aft along the 36-foot axis, how will the value of the moment of inertia of the free surface be affected? The moment of inertia would remain unchanged. The moment of inertia would be 1/4 its original value. The moment of inertia would be 1/2 the original value. None of the above
Many vessels are provided with flume tanks, which also have a dump tank located under the flume tanks. In the event the ship is damaged, you could dump the flume tanks into the dump tank which would . reduce the free surface effect and raise the KG not have any effect on free surface and raise the KG reduce the free surface effect and lower the KG not have any effect on free surface and lower the KG
Which statement about the free surface correction is TRUE? It is added to the uncorrected GM to arrive at the corrected available GM. It is obtained by dividing the free surface moments by 12 times the volume of displacement. It is obtained by dividing the total free surface by the total vertical moments. It is subtracted from the total longitudinal moments before dividing by displacement to find LCG.
Reducing free surfaces has the effect of lowering the . uncorrected KG virtual height of the center of gravity metacenter metacentric height
Increasing free surfaces has the effect of raising the . uncorrected KG virtual height of the center of gravity metacenter metacentric height
Subtracting FSCT from KGT yields BL GMT FSCT KG
Adding the FSCL to KG yields KM GM KGT KGL
The effects of free surface on initial stability depend upon the dimensions of the surface of the free liquids and the . volume of liquid in the tank volume of displacement of the vessel location of the tank in the vessel height of the center of gravity of the vessel
The free surface effects of a partially full liquid tank decrease with increased . density of the liquid placement of the tank above the keel displacement volume of the vessel size of the surface area in the tank
The free surface correction depends upon the dimensions of the surface of the free liauid and the . volume of liquid in the tank displacement of the vessel location of the tank in the vessel height of the center of gravity of the vessel
The free surface effects of a partially full tank in a vessel increase with the surface area of the fluid in the tank displacement volume of the vessel draft of the vessel height of the tank above the keel
The most detrimental effect on initial stability is a result of liquids flowing from side to side within the vessel flowing from fore to aft within a vessel flowing in and out of a holed wing tank pocketing in a slack tank as a vessel heels
The greatest effect on stability occurs from loose liquids flowing from side to side in the tanks of the vessel from fore to aft in the tanks of a vessel in and out of a vessel that is holed in a wing tank in and out of a vessel that is holed in a peak tank
Free communication effect is in direct proportion to . length and width of space length of space only width of space only neither length nor width
Free communication will adversely affect transverse stability only when the flooded space is . off-center on the centerline completely flooded open to the sea above and below the waterline
What is the principal danger from the liquid in a half full tank onboard a vessel? Corrosion from the shifting liquid Rupturing of bulkheads from the shifting liquid Loss of stability from free surface effect Holing of the tank bottom from the weight of the shifting liquid
You are fighting a fire in a cargo hold on your vessel. Which action is most important concerning the stability of the vessel? Shutting off electricity to damaged cables Draining firefighting water and pumping it overboard Maneuvering the vessel so the fire is on the lee side Removing burned debris from the cargo hold
Increasing the number of slack liquid tanks has the effect of raising the uncorrected KG maximum allowed KG virtual height of the center of gravity metacentric height
To calculate the free surface correction, it is necessary to divide the free-surface moments by the total weight of liquid loads total displacement lightweight deadweight
The correction to KG for transverse free surface effects may be found by dividing the vessel's displacement into the . transverse free surface correction for the vessel sum of the vertical moments of the vessel sum of the transverse free surface moments of the vessel transverse baseline of the vessel
The correction to KG for longitudinal free surface effects for a vessel can be found by dividing the vessel's displacement into the . transverse free surface correction for the vessel sum of the vertical moments of the vessel sum of the longitudinal free surface moments of the vessel longitudinal centerline of the vessel
Reducing the liquid free surfaces in a vessel reduces the . roll period metacentric height water plane area vessel's draft
A tank which is NOT completely full or empty is called . pressed slack inertial elemental
A tank which carries liquid is dangerous to the stability of a vessel when it is . low in the vessel completely empty completely full slack
To prevent loss of stability from free communication flooding you should close the crossconnection valve between the off-center tanks completely flood high center tanks ballast double bottom wing tanks close any opening to the sea in an off-center tank
The effect of free surface on initial stability depends upon . the amount of liquid in the compartment the dimensions of the liquid surface and the vessel's displacement only the length of the compartment the vertical position of the liquid in the vessel
The effects of free surface on a vessel's initial stability do NOT depend upon the . volume of displacement of the vessel dimensions of the surface of the liquid amount of liquid in slack tanks specific gravity of the liquid in the tank
The most important figure in calculating the free surface constant of a tank carrying liquids is depth length displacement breadth
What does NOT affect the value of the free surface correction? Width of the tank Length of the tank Registered tonnage Specific gravity of the liquid in the tank
Which factor has the greatest effect on the value of the free surface correction? The width of the tank The length of the tank The draft of the vessel The specific gravity of the liquid in the tank
Which statement about the free surface effect is TRUE? It increases in direct proportion to the length of the tank times the breadth squared. It decreases at increased angles of heel due to pocketing when a tank is 90% full. It decreases in direct proportion to increasing specific gravity of the liquid in the tank. In practice, the correction is considered to be a virtual reduction of KG.
Which statement about free surface is TRUE? A partially filled space with 40% surface permeability will have greater free surface effect than one with 60% surface permeability. Pocketing increases the loss of GM due to free surface effect. Cargo with a specific gravity of 1.05 has less free surface effect than a cargo with a specific gravity of 0.98. Pocketing occurs at small angles of inclination when a tank is 98% full.
Which statement about the free surface correction is TRUE? It is added to GM at light drafts and subtracted at deep drafts. It is increased if the slack tank is not on the centerline. It is decreased if the slack tank is below the KG of the vessel. The correction decreases as the draft increases due to loading dry cargo.
Which statement about the free surface effect is TRUE? It has the same affect on initial stability whether the tank is 75% full or 25% full. The free surface effect usually increases at angles of heel above 25°. The effect increases if the tank is off the centerline. The effect can be reduced by shifting weights vertically.
Which statement about the free surface correction is TRUE? It is added to GM at light drafts and subtracted at deep drafts. It is increased if the slack tank is not on the centerline. It is decreased if the slack tank is below the KG of the vessel. The correction decreases as the draft increases
A vessel is equipped with cross-connected deep tanks. In which situation should the cross-connection valve be closed? The tanks lie above the waterline and are filled. The tanks are partially filled with dry cargo. The tanks are partially filled with liquid cargo. The tanks are filled and lie below the waterline.
A bulk freighter 680 ft. in length, 60 ft. beam, with a water plane coefficient of .84, is floating in salt water at a draft of 21'. How many long tons would it take to increase the mean draft by 1"? 64.3 tons 69.6 tons 81.6 tons 116 tons
A bulk freighter 580 ft. in length, 60 ft. beam, with a water plane coefficient of .84 is floating in salt water at a draft of 21 ft. How many long tons would it take to increase the mean draft 1"? 65.1 69.6 74.3 76.8
In order to calculate the TPI of a vessel, for any given draft, it is necessary to divide the area of the water plane by . 35 120 240 420
A vessel displaces 140,000 cubic feet of saltwater in a light condition. After loading 7500 tons of cargo and 200 tons of fuel, water and stores, she is "full and down". The vessel's light displacement is . 3000 tons 3500 tons 4000 tons 4500 tons
A vessel's heavy displacement is 24,500 tons with light displacement of 13,300 tons. Fully loaded it carries 300 tons of fuel and stores. What is the vessel's deadweight? 10,900 tons 11,200 tons 13,000 tons 24,200 tons
Your vessel has a forward draft of 26'11" and an after draft of 29'-07". How many tons of cargo can be loaded before the vessel reaches a mean draft of 28'-06" if the TPI is 69? 204 tons 207 tons 210 tons 213 tons
A vessel's mean draft is 29'-07". At this draft, the TPI is 152. The mean draft after loading 1360 tons will be 29'-09" 29'-11" 30'-04" 30'-07"
A tanker's mean draft is 32'-05". At this draft, the TPI is 178. The mean draft after loading 1200 tons will be 33'-00" 33'-04" 33'-08" 33'-11"
Your drafts are: FWD 6'-01", AFT 6'05". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft by 1 inch for every 7 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 20 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can be loaded while maintaining the same trim? none 10.5 tons 14.0 tons 17.5 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 6'-00", AFT 6'06". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft 1 inch for every 6 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 17 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can be loaded and still maintain the same trim? 14 tons 18 tons 24 tons 33 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 5'-08", AFT 6'04". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft 1 inch for every 7 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 10 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can be loaded and still maintain the same trim? 14.8 tons 18.0 tons 25.0 tons 32.0 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 5'-08", AFT 6'02". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft 1 inch for every 8 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 11 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can be loaded and still maintain the same trim? None 10 tons 18 tons 24 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 6'-01", AFT 6'10". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft 1 inch for every 6 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 11 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can be loaded and still maintain the same trim? 6 tons 12 tons 18 tons 24 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 5'-11", AFT 6'11". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft 1 inch for every 7 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 16 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can be loaded and still maintain the same trim? 8 tons 12 tons 10 tons 14 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 6'-02", AFT 6'08". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft 1 inch for every 6 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 23 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can be loaded and still maintain the same trim? 6 tons 12 tons 18 tons 24 tons
A vessel's drafts are: FWD 14'-04", AFT 15'-08". How much more cargo can be loaded to have the vessel down to the freeboard draft? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 7280 tons 7879 tons 8004 tons 8104 tons
A vessel's drafts are: FWD 19'-00", AFT 17'-02". How much more cargo can be loaded to have the vessel down to the freeboard draft? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 5928 tons 6016 tons 6149 tons 6242 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 14'-04", AFT 12'-08". How much more cargo can be loaded to have the vessel down to the freeboard draft? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 6500 tons 7001 tons 7415 tons 8699 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 13'-11", AFT 11'-09". How much more cargo can be loaded to have the vessel down to the freeboard draft? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 9069 tons 9172 tons 9207 tons 9244 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 18'-09", AFT 20'-03". How much more cargo can be loaded to have the vessel down to the freeboard draft? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 4521 tons 5349 tons 7242 tons 9750 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 18'-09", AFT 19'-01". How much more cargo can be loaded to have the vessel down to the freeboard draft? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 5333 tons 5420 tons 5649 tons 5775 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 13'-11", AFT 16'-05". How much more cargo can be loaded to have the vessel down to the freeboard draft? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 7109 tons 7316 tons 7432 tons 7779 tons
A vessel's drafts are: FWD 19'-00", AFT 21'-10". How much more cargo can be loaded to have the vessel down to the freeboard draft? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 4819 tons 4982 tons 5012 tons 5099 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 6'-2", AFT 6'8". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft 1 inch for every 6 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 23 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can be loaded and still maintain the same trim? 24 tons 18 tons 12 tons 6 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 6'-02", AFT 6'06". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft 1 inch for every 5 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 15 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can legally be loaded and still maintain the same trim? none 5 tons 10 tons 20 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 6'-01", AFT 6'05". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft 1 inch for every 5 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 15 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can legally be loaded and still maintain the same trim? 10 tons 20 tons 35 tons None
Where are the draft marks required to be displayed on a ship? Deep tanks Voids Midships near the waterline Area of water line near stem and stern
You are reading the draft marks. The water level is about 4 inches below the bottom of the number 11. What is the draft? 10'-08" 10'-10" 11-04" 11'-08"
You are reading the draft marks in illustration D032DG. The water level forward is at the top of the 8, and the mean water level aft is at the top of the 8. What is the mean draft? 8'06" 8'03" 8'00" 7'06"
You are reading the draft marks. The top 2 inches of the 9 forward is visible above the water level, and the water level is four inches below the 10 aft. What is the mean draft? 9'-10" 9'-06" 9'-04" 9'-02"
You are reading the draft marks. The water level is at the bottom of number 11. What is the draft? 11-06" 11'-00" 10'-09" 10'-06"
You are reading the draft marks in illustration D032DG. The water level forward is 4 inches below the 11, and the water level aft is 2 inches below the top of the 11. What is the mean draft? 11-08" 11'-06" 11-04" 11'-00"
You are reading the draft marks in illustration D032DG. The water level is at the top of number 8. What is the draft? 7'-09" 8'-00" 8'-03" 8'-06"
You are reading the draft marks as shown. The water level forward leaves about 4 inches of the 11 visible, and the water level aft is at the top of the 10. What is the mean draft? 10'-06" 10'-08" 10'-10" 11-02"
You are reading the draft marks in illustration D032DG. The water level is about 4 inches below the bottom of 10. What is the draft? 10'-04" 10'-02" 9'-08" 9'-04"
You are reading the draft marks. The top 2 inches of number "9" are visible above the waterline. What is the draft? 8'-10" 9'-02" 9'-04" 9'-08"
You are reading draft marks on a vessel. The water level is halfway between the bottom of the number 5 and the top of the number 5. What is the draft of the vessel? 4'-09" 5'-09" 5'-03" 5'-06"
What is the displacement of a barge which measures 85' x 46' x 13' and is floating in salt water with a draft of ten feet? 1117 tons 1452 tons 500 tons 17.5 tons
A wind has caused a difference between drafts starboard and port. This difference is . list heel trim flotation
The difference between the initial trim and the trim after loading is known as trim change of trim final trim change of draft
The difference between the starboard and port drafts due to wind or seas is called . list heel trim flotation
Forces within a vessel have caused a difference between the starboard and port drafts. This difference is called list heel trim flotation
The maximum mean draft to which a vessel may be safely loaded is called mean draft calculated draft deep draft load line draft
That center around which a vessel trims is called the . tipping center center of buoyancy center of gravity turning center
The distance between the bottom of the hull and the waterline is called tonnage reserve buoyancy draft freeboard
For an upright vessel, draft is the vertical distance between the keel and the . waterline freeboard deck Plimsoll mark amidships section
After transferring a weight forward on a vessel, the draft at the center of flotation will . change, depending on the location of the LCG increase decrease remain constant
The average of the forward and after drafts is the . mean draft true mean draft mean of the calculated drafts draft at the center of flotation
Your vessel displaces 14,500 tons, with a longitudinal CG 247.5 ft. aft of the FP. If you pump 80 tons of ballast from forward to aft through a distance of 480 feet, your new CG will be 244.85 feet aft of FP 246.22 feet aft of FP 248.87 feet aft of FP 250.15 feet aft of FP
Your vessel is limited to a maximum draft of 27'-06". The present drafts are: FWD 24'-10", AFT 26'-00". How much more cargo can be loaded and where should it be located if a drag of 1 foot is desired? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 950 tons 2.5 feet forward of the tipping center 950 tons 5.6 feet aft of amidships 1250 tons 4.3 feet forward of amidships 1250 tons 1.4 feet aft of the tipping center
Your vessel is limited to a maximum draft of 26'-03". The present drafts are: FWD 22'-10", AFT 23'-08". How much more cargo can be loaded and where should it be located if a drag of 18 inches is desired? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 875 tons 6 feet aft of amidships 950 tons 8 feet forward of the tipping center 1323 tons 7 feet aft of the tipping center 1452 tons 7 feet aft of the tipping center
A vessel is limited to a maximum draft of 25'-11". The present drafts are: FWD 24'-10", AFT 23'-02". How much more cargo can be loaded and where should it be located if a drag of 18 inches is desired? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 345 tons 124 feet aft of the tipping center 525 tons 18 feet forward of the tipping center 640 tons 74 feet aft of the tipping center 690 tons 62 feet aft of the tipping center
A vessel is limited to a maximum draft of 26'-03". The present drafts are: FWD 21'-04", AFT 24'-06". How much more cargo can be loaded and where should it be located if a drag of 1 foot is desired? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 1676 tons 18 feet forward of amidships 1676 tons 18 feet forward of the tipping center 1972 tons 16 feet forward of amidships 1972 tons 16 feet forward of the tipping center
A weight of 250 tons is loaded on your vessel 95 feet forward of the tipping center. The vessel's MT1 is 1000 ft-tons. What is the total change of trim? 11.90 inches 18.75 inches 23.75 inches 38.01 inches
A weight of 350 tons is loaded on your vessel 85 feet forward of the tipping center. The vessel's MT1 is 1150 foot-tons. What is the total change of trim? 12.93 inches 23.75 inches 25.87 inches 38.50 inches
Your vessel's draft is 16'-00" fwd. and 18'-00" aft. The MT1 is 500 ft-tons. How many tons of water must be shifted from the after peak to the forepeak, a distance of 250 feet, to bring her to an even draft forward and aft? 52 tons 50 tons 48 tons 24 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 21'-08", AFT 24'-02". The LCG of the forepeak is 200 feet forward of amidships. How many tons of ballast must be pumped into the forepeak in order to have a drag of 15 inches? (Use the selected stability curves in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 72 tons 77 tons 82 tons 87 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 21'-08", AFT 24'-02". The LCG of the forepeak is 200 feet forward of amidships. How many tons of ballast must be pumped into the forepeak in order to have a drag of 18 inches? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 53 tons 57 tons 61 tons 65 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 19'-03", AFT 21'-03". The LCG of the forepeak is 200 feet forward of amidships. How many tons of ballast must be pumped into the forepeak in order to have a drag of 18 inches? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 27 tons 31 tons 34 tons 37 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 19'-03", AFT 21'-03". The LCG of the forepeak is 200 feet forward of amidships. How many tons of ballast must be pumped into the forepeak in order to have a drag of 1 foot? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 62 tons 68 tons 74 tons 78 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 14'-04", AFT 17'-08". The LCG of the forepeak is 200 feet forward of amidships. How many tons of ballast must be pumped into the forepeak in order to have a drag of 18 inches? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 110 tons 103 tons 100 tons 98 tons
Your vessel's draft is 24'-06" forward and aft. The MT1 of your vessel is 1000 ft-tons. How many tons of cargo must be loaded in number 4 hold, which is 100 feet abaft the tipping center, if she is to have a 2 foot drag? 120 tons 240 tons 300 tons 480 tons
Your vessel is on an even keel. The MT1 of your vessel is 1000 ft-tons. How many tons of cargo must be loaded in number 4 hold which is 100 feet abaft the tipping center, if she is to have a 2 foot drag? 90 tons 100 tons 130 tons 240 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 14'-04", AFT 17'-08". The LCG of the forepeak is 200 feet forward of amidships. How many tons of ballast must be pumped into the forepeak in order to have a drag of 2 feet? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 62 tons 65 tons 72 tons 75 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 23'-10", AFT 26'-00". The LCG of the forepeak is 200 feet forward of amidships. How many tons of ballast must be pumped into the forepeak in order to have a drag of 18 inches? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 34 tons 45 tons 55 tons 61 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 23'-10", AFT 26'-00". The LCG of the forepeak is 200 feet forward of amidships. How many tons of ballast must be pumped into the forepeak in order to have a drag of 1 foot? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 61 tons 72 tons 79 tons 86 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 22'-04", AFT 21'-06". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if: (1) 300 tons are loaded 122 feet forward of amidships; (2) 225 tons are loaded 150 feet aft of amidships; and 122 tons of fuel are pumped 72 feet aft. FWD 22'-11", AFT 22'-09" FWD 23'-00", AFT 23'-00" FWD 23'-02", AFT 23'-01" FWD 23'-03", AFT 23'-05"
Your vessel's drafts are FWD 24'-09", AFT 27'-01". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if 122 tons are discharged 76 feet aft of amidships, 128 tons are discharged 54 feet forward of amidships, and 68 tons of fuel is pumped 48 feet aft. FWD 24'-01", AFT 26'-08" FWD 24'-02", AFT 26'-11" FWD 24'-04", AFT 26'-08" FWD 24'-05", AFT 26'-02"
Your vessel's drafts are FWD 20'-09", AFT 21'-01". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if: (1) 320 tons are loaded 47 feet forward of amidships; (2) 82 tons are discharged 110 feet forward of amidships; and (3) 50 tons of fuel are pumped 60 feet forward. FWD 21'-05", AFT 21'-00" FWD 21'-06", AFT 21'-02" FWD 21'-04", AFT 21'-05" FWD 21'-04", AFT 21'-06"
A vessel's drafts are FWD 23'-01", AFT 24'-11". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if: (1) 142 tons are discharged 122 feet forward of amidships; (2) 321 tons are loaded 82 feet forward of amidships; and (3) 74 tons are discharged 62 feet aft of amidships. FWD 23'-05", AFT 24'-00" FWD 23'-06", AFT 24'-02" FWD 23'-07", AFT 24'-03" FWD 23'-09", AFT 24'-05"
Your vessel's drafts are FWD 20'-08", AFT 23'-00". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if 95 tons of cargo are loaded 76 feet forward of amidships. FWD 21'-01", AFT 22'-11" FWD 20'-09", AFT 22'-09" FWD 20'-09", AFT 23'-01" FWD 20'-08", AFT 23'-00"
A vessel's drafts are FWD 20'-08", AFT 20'-10". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if 195 tons of cargo are discharged 76 feet forward of amidships. FWD 19'-07", AFT 20'-10" FWD 19'-09", AFT 21-01'' FWD 20'-00", AFT 21'-00" FWD 20'-01", AFT 21'-05"
Your vessel's drafts are FWD 19'-03", AFT 21'-07". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if 142 tons of fuel are pumped 86 feet aft. FWD 18'-09", AFT 22'-01" FWD 19'-00", AFT 21'-01" FWD 19'-00", AFT 21'-08" FWD 19'-01", AFT 21'-04"
A vessel's drafts are FWD 19'-02", AFT 23'-10". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if 98 tons of fuel is pumped 116 feet forward. FWD 19'-04", AFT 23'-06" FWD 19'-07", AFT 23'-04" FWD 19'-09", AFT 23'-01" FWD 19'-09", AFT 23'-06"
Your vessel's drafts are FWD 20'-08", AFT 23'-00". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if 195 tons of cargo are discharged 76 feet aft of amidships. FWD 20'-05", AFT 21'-11" FWD 20'-07", AFT 22'-01" FWD 20'-11", AFT 22'-00" FWD 21'-03", AFT 22'-04"
Your vessel's drafts are FWD 24'-02", AFT 24'-04". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if 295 tons of cargo are loaded 122 feet aft of amidships. FWD 22'-08", AFT 26'-00" FWD 22'-10", AFT 25'-09" FWD 23'-04", AFT 26'-03" FWD 23'-05", AFT 25'-11"
Your vessel's drafts are FWD 19'-02", AFT 23'-10". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if 98 tons of fuel is loaded 116 feet forward of amidships. FWD 19'-04", AFT 23'-06" FWD 19'-07", AFT 23'-04" FWD 19'-09", AFT 23'-01" FWD 19'-09", AFT 23'-06"
Your vessel's drafts are FWD 19'-03", AFT 21'-07". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if 142 tons of cargo are loaded 86 feet forward of amidships. FWD 18'-09", AFT 21'-04" FWD 18'-10", AFT 21-01" FWD 19-10", AFT 21'-08" FWD 19'-11", AFT 21'-04"
Use the floodable length curve in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the curve represents 45 percent permeability, and holds 1 and 2 flood, the vessel will sink if the permeability exceeds what percent? 19 24 32 39
Use the floodable length curve in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the curve represents 45 percent permeability, and holds 2 and 3 flood, the vessel will sink if the permeability exceeds what percent? 37 31 26 23
Use the floodable length curve in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the curve represents 45 percent permeability and holds 4 and 5 flood, the vessel will sink if the permeability exceeds what percent? 22 28 34 39
Use the floodable length curve in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the curve represents 45 percent permeability and number 5 hold floods, the vessel will sink if the permeability exceeds what percent? 66% 70% 74% 79%
Use the floodable length curve in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the curve represents 45 percent permeability and number 4 hold floods, the vessel will sink if the permeability exceeds what percent? 40 48 53 60
Use the floodable length curve in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the curve represents 45 percent permeability and number 3 hold floods, the vessel will sink if the permeability exceeds what percent? 64 68 72 78
Use the floodable length curve in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the curve represents 45 percent permeability and number 2 hold floods, the vessel will sink if the permeability exceeds what percent? 76 67 60 52
Use the floodable length curve in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the curve represents 45 percent permeability and number 1 hold floods, the vessel will sink if the permeability exceeds what percent? 63 66 71 77
Use the material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the KG is 25.2 feet, and the drafts are: FWD 27'-11", AFT 28'-09"; at what angle will the vessel lose positive stability? 54° cn CD o 65° 71°
Use the material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the KG is 25.8 feet, and the drafts are: FWD 15'-02", AFT 15'-10"; at what angle will the vessel lose positive stability? o CO -v| CD o OO -v| o CD OO o
Use the material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the KG is 24.0 feet, and the drafts are: FWD 28'-01", AFT 28'-06"; at what angle will the vessel lose positive stability? o N- CD 71° 77° o CN OO
Use the material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the KG is 24.2 feet, and the drafts are: FWD 22'-04", AFT 23'-00"; at what angle will the vessel lose positive stability? o CN h- o CO o CD CO 92°
Use the material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the KG is 25.2 feet, and the drafts are: FWD 22'-03", AFT 23'-01"; at what angle will the vessel lose positive stability? 92° 77° o CO CD 61°
Use the material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the KG is 22.0 feet, and the drafts are: FWD 23'-06", AFT 24'-03"; at what angle will the vessel lose positive stability? 76° 84° 89° 98°
Use the material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the KG is 23.0 feet, and the drafts are: FWD 15'-03", AFT 15'-09"; at what angle will the vessel lose positive stability? 57° 72° 81° 90°
Use the material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the KG is 24.2 feet, and the drafts are: FWD 23'-04", AFT 24'-05"; at what angle will the vessel lose positive stability? 67° 71° 75° -v| CD o
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 17'-05", AFT 20'-01"; and the KG is 25.6 feet. What is the righting moment when the vessel is inclined to 45°? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 18,294 foot-tons 19,709 foot-tons 21,137 foot-tons 22,002 foot-tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 24'-07", AFT 25'-09"; and the KG is 23.2 feet. What is the righting moment when the vessel is inclined to 45°? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 27,008 foot-tons 29,778 foot-tons 32,428 foot-tons 34,663 foot-tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 17'-05", AFT 20'-01"; and the KG is 22.4 feet. What is the righting moment when the vessel is inclined to 15°? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 10,656 foot-tons 12,340 foot-tons 13,980 foot-tons 17,520 foot-tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 14'-11", AFT 16'-01"; and the KG is 24.4 feet. What is the righting moment when the vessel is inclined to 30°? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 24,960 foot-tons 22,870 foot-tons 20,360 foot-tons 18,240 foot-tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 22'-03", AFT 22'-09"; and the KG is 23.2 feet. What is the righting moment when the vessel is inclined to 30°? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 20,790 foot-tons 23,780 foot-tons 25,520 foot-tons 27,260 foot-tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 14'-11", AFT 16'-01"; and the KG is 23.2 feet. What is the righting moment when the vessel is inclined to 15°? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 5,800 foot-tons 7,600 foot-tons 9,272 foot-tons 11,200 foot-tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 22'-03", AFT 22'-09"; and the KG is 24.4 feet. What is the righting moment when the vessel is inclined to 15°? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 4,176 foot-tons 5,916 foot-tons 7,076 foot-tons 9,003 foot-tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 24'-07", AFT 25'-09"; and the KG is 24.0 feet. What is the righting moment when the vessel is inclined to 15°? (Use the selected stability curves in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 5,202 foot-tons 8,666 foot-tons 10,876 foot-tons 11,424 foot-tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 22'-04", AFT 22'-10"; and the KG is 22.6 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 45° inclination. 1.8 feet 2.6 feet 2.9 feet 3.6 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 17'-07", AFT 16'-09"; and the KG is 24.8 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 15° inclination. 0.7 foot 1.2 feet 1.9 feet 4.8 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 27'-06", AFT 28'-02"; and the KG is 23.1 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 60° inclination. 0.9 foot 1.8 feet 2.7 feet 4.5 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 18'-09", AFT 20'-05"; and the KG is 23.8 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 15° inclination. 0.7 foot 1.0 feet 1.7 feet 3.8 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 17'-07", AFT 16'-09"; and the KG is 21.5 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 30° inclination. 0.8 foot 1.5 feet 2.7 feet 3.6 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 22'-04", AFT 22'-10"; and the KG is 18.4 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 30° inclination. 1.6 feet 2.9 feet 3.8 feet 4.6 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 27'-06", AFT 28'-02"; and the KG is 21.3 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 15° inclination. 0.3 foot 1.3 feet 1.5 feet 1.8 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 24'-04", AFT 25'-10"; and the KG is 23.5 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 37° inclination. 1.9 feet 2.1 feet 3.5 feet 4.2 feet
Tour vessel's drafts are: FWD 22'-09", AFT 23'-07"; and the KG is 24.2 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 18° inclination. 0.7 foot 1.3 feet 2.0 feet 2.3 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 24'-06", AFT 25'-04"; and the KG is 22.2 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 20° inclination. 0.5 foot 0.8 foot 1.4 feet 2.2 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 18'-06", AFT 19'-01"; and the KG is 18.2 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 35° inclination. 1.8 feet 3.0 feet 4.7 feet 5.8 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 16'-08", AFT 17'-06"; and the KG is 23.8 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the remaining righting arm at 60° inclination if the center of gravity is 1.7 feet off the centerline. 1.8 feet 2.1 feet 3.0 feet 3.8 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 14'-00", AFT 14'-08"; and the KG is 25.8 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the remaining righting arm at 30° inclination if the center of gravity is 1.5 feet off the centerline. 0.6 foot 1.3 feet 1.9 feet 2.9 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 19'-09", AFT 20'-09"; and the KG is 24.6 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the remaining righting arm at 15° inclination if the center of gravity is 0.5 foot off the centerline. 0.0 feet 0.5 foot 1.2 feet 1.7 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 21'-04", AFT 21'-08"; and the KG is 20.6 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the remaining righting arm at 45° inclination if the center of gravity is 1.2 feet off the centerline. 3.8 feet 4.4 feet 5.2 feet 5.6 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 23'-01", AFT 24'-05"; and the KG is 22.8 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the remaining righting arm at 30° inclination if the center of gravity is 1.9 feet off the centerline. 3.7 feet 2.3 feet 1.4 feet 0.7 foot
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 27'-06", AFT 28'-02"; and the KG is 23.1 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the remaining righting arm at 60° inclination if the center of gravity is 2.4 feet off the centerline. 2.4 feet 1.8 feet 0.5 foot 0.2 foot
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 17'-07", AFT 16'-09"; and the KG is 21.5 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the remaining righting arm at 30° inclination if the center of gravity is 0.9 foot off the centerline. 1.5 feet 2.8 feet 3.6 feet 4.3 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 24'-06", AFT 25'-04"; and the KG is 17.8 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the remaining righting arm at 75° inclination if the center of gravity is 2.5 feet off the centerline. 2.5 feet 3.3 feet 5.4 feet 9.7 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 27'-06", AFT 28'-02"; and the KG is 23.1 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 37° inclination if the center of gravity is 1.8 feet off center. 0.4 foot 1.4 feet 1.8 feet 2.6 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 18'-09", AFT 20'-05"; and the KG is 23.8 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 26° inclination if the center of gravity is 1.0 foot off center. 0.0 feet 0.4 foot 0.8 foot 1.7 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 24'-06", AFT 25'-08"; and the KG is 22.9 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 50° inclination if the center of gravity is 0.5 foot off center. 3.3 feet 2.6 feet 2.3 feet 2.0 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 22'-04", AFT 23'-06"; and the KG is 22.4 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 19° inclination if the center of gravity is 1.3 feet off center. 0.2 foot 0.8 foot 1.4 feet 2.2 feet
The sailing drafts are: FWD 22'-08", AFT 23'-04" and the GM is 4.6 feet. Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, to determine the available righting arm at 20° inclination. 2.1 feet 2.4 feet 2.8 feet 3.2 feet
The sailing drafts are: FWD 22'-06", AFT 23'-06" and the GM is 3.3 feet. Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, to determine the available righting arm at 22° inclination. 1.2 feet 1.8 feet 2.4 feet 3.0 feet
The sailing drafts are: FWD 24'-03", AFT 25'-03" and the GM is 5.5 feet. Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book, to determine the available righting arm at 30° inclination. 2.6 feet 2.9 feet 3.2 feet 3.5 feet
The sailing drafts are: FWD 25'-03", AFT 26'-03" and the GM is 3.5 feet. Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, to determine the available righting arm at 25° inclination. 0.8 foot 1.4 feet 2.0 feet 2.6 feet
The sailing drafts are: FWD 16'-06", AFT 17'-04" and the GM is 2.6 feet. Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, to determine the available righting arm at 15° inclination. 0.4 foot 0.8 foot 1.2 feet 1.9 feet
The sailing drafts are: FWD 23'-02", AFT 24'-06" and the GM is 2.8 feet. Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available righting arm at 30° inclination. 1.3 feet 2.5 feet 3.2 feet 3.7 feet
The sailing drafts are: FWD 14'-08", AFT 15'-06" and the GM is 4.8 feet. Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, to determine the available righting arm at 40° inclination. 3.3 feet 3.7 feet 4.3 feet 5.4 feet
The sailing drafts are: FWD 23'-10", AFT 25'-02" and the GM is 5.3 feet. Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, to determine the available righting arm at 18° inclination. 0.8 feet 1.1 feet 1.5 feet 1.9 feet
Your vessel displaces 9,000 tons and has a KG of 21.2 feet. What will be the length of the remaining righting arm at an angle of inclination of 30° if the center of gravity shifts 2.6 feet transversely? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 3.8 feet 2.2 feet 1.4 feet 0.9 foot
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 18'-09", AFT 20'-05"; and the KG is 23.8 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 30° inclination. 0.9 feet 2.1 feet 4.0 feet 5.9 feet
A vessel's drafts are: FWD 16'-03", AFT 16'-09"; and the KG is 21.3 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the angle of list if the center of gravity is shifted 2 feet off the centerline. 12° 14° 20° o CN CN
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 17'-09", AFT 18'-03"; and the KG is 22.4 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the angle of list if the center of gravity is shifted 1.5 feet off the centerline. 14° 18° o CNJ CNJ o CD CNJ
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 21'-09", AFT 23'-03"; and the KG is 20.0 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the angle of list if the center of gravity is shifted 1.9 feet off the centerline. 12° 15° 19°
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 14'-11", AFT 15'-09"; and the KG is 18.2 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the angle of list if the center of gravity is shifted 2.0 feet off the centerline. 12° 16° 19°
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 14'-04", AFT 15'-02"; and the KG is 23.2 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the angle of list if the center of gravity is shifted 1.0 foot off the centerline. 12° 15° 17°
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 15'-09", AFT 16'-08"; and the KG is 23.6 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the angle of list if the center of gravity is shifted 0.9 foot off the centerline. 15° 18° 21° 24°
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 27'-09", AFT 28'-03"; and the KG is 22.4 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the angle of list if the center of gravity is shifted 1.6 feet off the centerline. 16° 20° 24° o O CO
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 18'-03", AFT 18'-09"; and the KG is 22.6 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the angle of list if the center of gravity is shifted 1.4 feet off the centerline. 18° o CNJ CNJ o CD CNJ o O CO
You have 420 tons of below deck tonnage and 150 tons of above deck cargo on board. You must load 135 tons of liquid mud below deck. How much more deck cargo can you load? (See the trim and stability letter for M.V. Hudson, illustration D036DG.) 90 tons 140 tons 155 tons 240 tons
You have 420 tons of below deck tonnage and 180 tons of above deck cargo on board. You must load 140 tons of liquid mud below deck. How much more deck cargo can you load? (See illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson.) 60 tons 100 tons 180 tons 240 tons
You have 360 tons of below deck tonnage and 145 tons of above deck cargo on board. You must load 220 tons of liquid mud below deck. How much more deck cargo can you load? (See illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson.) 22 tons 48 tons 94 tons 239 tons
You have 400 tons of below deck tonnage and 230 tons of above deck cargo on board. You must load 220 tons of liquid mud below deck. How much more deck cargo can you load? (See illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson.) 60 tons 180 tons 240 tons none
You have 160 tons of below deck tonnage and 300 tons of above deck cargo on board. You must load 110 tons of liquid mud below deck. How much more deck cargo can you load? (See illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson.) 55 tons 99 tons 140 tons 360 tons
You have 360 tons of below deck tonnage and 210 tons of above deck cargo on board. You must load 100 tons of liquid mud below deck. How much more deck cargo can you load? (See illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson.) 25 tons 65 tons 95 tons 175 tons
You have 60 tons of below deck tonnage and 220 tons of above deck cargo on board. You must load 240 tons of liquid mud below deck. How much more deck cargo can you load? (See illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson.) 65 tons 85 tons 110 tons 125 tons
You have 400 tons of below deck tonnage and 100 tons of above deck cargo on board. You must load 160 tons of liquid mud below deck. How much more deck cargo can you load? (See illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson.) 85 tons 135 tons 195 tons 245 tons
You have 520 tons of below deck tonnage including liquid mud. Your existing deck cargo is 160 tons with a VCG above the deck of 2.7 feet. What is the maximum cargo tonnage you are permitted to load? (See the stability letter for the M.V. Hudson illustration D036DG.) 84 tons 160 tons 244 tons 317 tons
You have 260 tons of below deck tonnage including liquid mud. Your existing deck cargo is 150 tons with a VCG above the deck of 2.2 feet. What is the maximum additional cargo tonnage you are permitted to load? (See illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson.) 110 tons 140 tons 180 tons 210 tons
You have 180 tons of below deck tonnage including liquid mud. Your existing deck cargo is 300 tons with a VCG above the deck of 3.0 feet. What is the maximum additional cargo tonnage you are permitted to load? (See illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson.) 20 tons 60 tons 100 tons 400 tons
You have 550 tons of below deck tonnage including liquid mud. Your existing deck cargo is 120 tons with a VCG above the deck of 2.6 feet. What is the maximum additional deck cargo tonnage you are permitted to load? (See illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson) 20 tons 60 tons 120 tons 240 tons
You have 700 tons of below deck tonnage including liquid mud. Your existing deck cargo is 200 tons with a VCG above the deck of 3.0 feet. What is the maximum additional cargo tonnage you are permitted to load? (See illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson.) 20 tons 50 tons 80 tons 210 tons
You have 650 tons of below deck tonnage including liquid mud. Your existing deck cargo is 140 tons with a VCG above the deck of 2.5 feet. What is the maximum additional cargo tonnage you are permitted to load? (See illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson.) 15 tons 48 tons 83 tons 140 tons
You have 480 tons of below deck tonnage including liquid mud. Your existing deck cargo is 200 tons with a VCG above the deck of 2.8 feet. What is the maximum additional cargo tonnage you are permitted to load? (See illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson.) 34 tons 62 tons 134 tons 186 tons
You have 300 tons of below deck tonnage including liquid mud. Your existing deck cargo is 180 tons with a VCG above the deck of 1.9 feet. What is the maximum additional cargo tonnage you are permitted to load? (See illustration D036DG, stability letter for M.V. Hudson.) 108 tons 124 tons 162 tons 342 tons
A vessel displaces 12,000 tons and has a KG of 22.8 feet. What will be the length of the remaining righting arm at an angle of inclination of 60° if the center of gravity shifts 1.8 feet transversely? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) -1.6 feet -0.1 foot 1.2 feet 1.9 feet
Your vessel displaces 10,000 tons and has a KG of 22.6 feet. What will be the length of the remaining righting arm at an angle of inclination of 45° if the center of gravity shifts 2.0 feet transversely? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 3.8 feet 2.7 feet 1.9 feet 0.9 foot
Your vessel displaces 12,000 tons and has a KG of 22.6 feet. What will be the length of the remaining righting arm at an angle of inclination of 30° if the center of gravity shifts 1.8 feet transversely? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 0.8 foot 1.2 feet 1.8 feet 2.3 feet
Your vessel is damaged and listing to port. There is a short rolling period around the angle of list. The port side freeboard is reduced to 1 foot. There is no trim and the weather is calm. You should FIRST . press up a slack double bottom tank on the port side fill an empty centerline double bottom tank pump out a slack marine portable tank located on the portside amidships jettison the anchors and anchor cables
Your vessel has been holed in #1 hold and partially flooded. The hole is plugged against further flooding. In calculating the effect of the flooding on your transverse stability, you should use which method? Compartment standard method Lost buoyancy method Factor of subdivision method Added weight method
If your vessel is aground at the bow, it would be preferable that any weight removals be made from the bow mid-section stern All of the above
Before counterflooding to correct a list, you must be sure the list is due to which of the following choices? negative GM flooding off-center weight reserve buoyancy
Your vessel has been in a collision. After assessing the damage, you begin down flooding. This will cause the KB to do what? Fall Remain stationary Rise Shift to the high side
Your vessel is listing because of a negative GM. To lower G below M, you should . deballast transfer weight to the high side ballast on the high side add weight symmetrically below G
If a vessel takes a sudden, severe list or trim from an unknown cause, you should FIRST . determine the cause before taking countermeasures assume the shift is due to off-center loading counterflood assume the cause is environmental forces
During counterflooding to correct a severe list aggravated by an off-center load, your vessel suddenly takes a list or trim to the opposite side. You should . continue counterflooding in the same direction continue counterflooding, but in the opposite direction immediately stop counterflooding deballast from the low side
If the cause of severe list or trim is off-center ballast, counterflooding into empty tanks will . increase the righting moment increase the righting arm increase list or trim decrease list or trim
If the cause of a sudden severe list is negative initial stability, counterflooding into empty tanks may increase the righting moment cause an increase in the righting arm bring the vessel to an upright equilibrium position cause the vessel to flop to a greater angle
Your vessel is damaged and on an even keel. There is no trim. The freeboard is reduced to less than 1 foot. The rolling period is very long, and the vessel is sluggish in returning from a roll. Which action would you take FIRST to improve stability? In calm seas lower the lifeboats to the water and keep them alongside. Rig the jumbo boom and use it to jettison heavy deck cargo. Press up a centerline double bottom that is now filled to 15% capacity. Pump out the peak tanks simultaneously.
Your vessel is damaged and listing to port. The rolling period is long, and the vessel will occasionally assume a starboard list. Which action should you take FIRST? Fill an empty double bottom tank on the starboard side Transfer all possible movable weights from port to starboard Pump out ballast from the port and starboard double bottom tanks Press up a slack centerline double bottom tank
Your vessel is damaged, and there is no list or trim. The rolling period is short. The freeboard before the damage was 12'02" (3.7 meters). It is now reduced to 3'00"(1 meter). Which action would you take FIRST? Press up a slack centerline double bottom tank Pump out an amidships centerline ballast tank Transfer ballast from the peak tanks to an amidships centerline tank Pump out the marine potable tank located on the starboard side amidships
Your vessel is damaged and partially flooded. It is listing 12° to port and trimmed 8 feet down by the head. It has a long, slow, sluggish roll. Which action should you take FIRST? Press up an after, slack, centerline double bottom tank Pump out the forepeak tank Jettison the anchors and anchor cables Jettison deck cargo from the port side
Your vessel is listing 4° to port and has a short rolling period. There is loose firefighting water in the hull. The ship is trimmed down by the head with one foot of freeboard at the bow. Which action should you take FIRST? Press up the slack NO.1 starboard double bottom tank. Pump out the forepeak tank. Eliminate the water in the 'tween decks aft. Jettison stores out of the paint locker in the fo'c'sle.
You are on the SS American Mariner and involved in a collision. Your draft has increased uniformly and there is about 4 feet of freeboard remaining. The vessel is on an even keel and has a long rolling period. The roll is sluggish, and the vessel hangs at the ends of a roll. Which of the following actions would you take first to correct the situation? Pump out a slack double bottom tank to reduce free surface. Flood any empty double bottom tanks to decrease KG. Jettison topside weights to increase freeboard. Pump out flooding water in the cargo holds to reduce free surface.
Your vessel is damaged, listing to port and on occasion flopping to the same angle to starboard. It has a long, slow, sluggish roll around the angle of list. There is excessive trim by the stern with little freeboard aft. What action should you take FIRST to correct this situation? Jettison any off-center topside weights to lower GM and correct the list. Pump out any slack after doublebottom tanks to reduce free surface and increase freeboard aft. Pump out the after peak and fill the forepeak to change the trim. Press up any slack double-bottom tanks forward of the tipping center, then fill the forepeak if empty.
Your vessel is damaged with no list, but down by the stern. There is progressive flooding and trim by the stern is increasing. What is the effect on transverse stability after the deck edge at the stern is submerged? KB increases, increasing BM and therefore GM KG increases due to the weight of the added water on deck BM decreases from loss of water plane and greater volume. There is no effect on transverse stability.
Your vessel is damaged and is listing to port. The rolling period is short. There is sufficient freeboard so that deck edge submersion is not a problem. What corrective action should be taken FIRST in regard to the vessel's stability? Press up any slack double-bottom tanks to eliminate free surface Flood any empty double-bottom tanks to add weight low and down Jettison topside weights to reduce KG and KB Shift any off-center weights from port to starboard
Your ship of 12,000 tons displacement has a center of gravity of 21.5 feet above the keel. You run aground and estimate the weight aground is 2500 tons. The virtual rise in the center of gravity is . 1.26 feet 3.80 feet 4.80 feet 5.66 feet
A vessel aground may have negative GM since the . decrease in KM is equal to the loss of draft virtual rise of G is directly proportional to the remaining draft displacement lost acts at the point where the ship is aground lost buoyancy method is used to calculate KM, and KB is reduced
A vessel aground may have negative GM since the . decrease in KM is equal to the loss of draft virtual rise of G is directly proportional to the remaining draft lost buoyancy method is used to calculate KM, and KB is reduced displacement lost acts at the point where the ship is aground
When flooding occurs in a damaged vessel, reserve buoyancy decreases remains the same increases shifts to the low side
Aboard damaged vessels, the MOST important consideration is preserving bilge pumping capacity reserve buoyancy level attitude instability
The stability which remains after a compartment is flooded is called intact stability initial stability immersion stability damage stability
Damage stability is the stability which exists when the wind speed is less than 50 knots before collision after flooding at the maximum load
You are fighting a fire in a watertight compartment using hoses and salt water. Stability may be reduced because of . progressive downflooding reduction of water in the storage tanks increase in free surface which reduces the metacentric height reduction of KG to the minimum allowable
You are fighting a fire in a watertight compartment using hoses and river water. Stability may be reduced because of . progressive downflooding reduction of water in the storage tanks increase in free surface which reduces the metacentric height reduction of KG to the minimum allowable
Jettisoning weight from topside returns the vessel to an even keel reduces free surface effect lowers the center of gravity raises the center of buoyancy
To check stability, a weight of 10 tons is lifted with the jumbo boom whose head is 45 ft. from the ship's centerline. The clinometer show's a list of 5.0° with weight suspended. Displacement including the weight is 9,000 tons. The GM while in this condition is . 0.57 foot 0.72 foot 0.96 foot 1.25 feet
You are making a heavy lift with the jumbo boom. Your vessel displaces 18,000 T. The 50-ton weight is on the pier, and its center is 75 feet to starboard of the centerline. The head of the boom is 112 feet above the base line, and the center of gravity of the lift when stowed on deck will be 56 feet above the base line. As the jumbo boom takes the strain, the ship lists 3.5°. What is the GM when the cargo is stowed? 3.19 feet 3.24 feet 3.40 feet 3.56 feet
To check stability, a weight of 40 tons is lifted with the jumbo boom, whose head is 40 feet from the ship's centerline. The clinometer shows a list of 6.5° with the weight suspended. Displacement including weight is 16,000 tons. The GM while in this condition is . 0.21 foot 0.43 foot 0.88 foot 1.02 feet
To check stability, a weight of 35 tons is lifted with the jumbo boom, whose head is 35 feet from the ship's centerline. The clinometer shows a list of 7.0° with the weight suspended. Displacement including the weight is 14,000 tons. The GM in this condition is . 0.71 foot 0.95 foot 1.26 feet 2.01 feet
Sixty (60) tons of cargo are raised with a heavy lift boom 45 feet from the centerline. The vessel's displacement including the weight lifted is 18,400 tons. The angle of list caused by the suspended weight is 1.5°, KM is 28.75 ft., and BM is 17.25 ft. What is the KG? 11.65 feet 22.85 feet 23.15 feet 23.82 feet
A ship is inclined by moving a weight of 30 tons a distance of 30 ft. from the centerline. A 28-foot pendulum shows a deflection of 12 inches. Displacement including weight moved is 4,000 tons. KM is 27.64 feet. What is the KG? 21.34 feet 22.06 feet 22.76 feet 23.21 feet
Sixty tons of cargo are raised with a boom 45 feet from the centerline. The vessel's displacement including the weight lifted is 16,400 tons. The angle of list caused by the suspended weight is 1.5°. KM is 28.75 ft., and BM is 17.25 ft. What is the KG? 11.65 feet 22.46 feet 23.15 feet 23.82 feet
In order to check your vessel's stability, a weight of 40 tons is lifted with the jumbo boom, the boom head being 50 feet from the ship's centerline. The clinometer is then carefully read and shows a list of 5°. The vessel's displacement is 8,000 tons including the suspended weight. What will be the metacentric height of the vessel at this time? 2.74 feet 2.80 feet 2.86 feet 2.93 feet
You are hoisting a heavy lift with the jumbo boom. Your vessel displaces 8560 T. The 45-ton weight is on the pier and its center is 65' to starboard of the centerline. The head of the boom is 95' above the base line and the center of gravity of the lift when stowed on deck will be 55' above the base line. As the jumbo boom takes the strain the ship lists to 5.5°. What is the GM with the cargo stowed? 3.74 ft. 3.96 ft. 4.16 ft. 4.35 ft.
You are hoisting a heavy lift with the jumbo boom. Your vessel displaces 5230 T. The 35-ton weight is on the pier and its center is 60' to starboard of the centerline. The head of the boom is 105' above the base line and the center of gravity of the lift when stowed on deck will be 42' above the base line. As the jumbo boom takes the strain the ship lists to 5°. What is the GM with the cargo stowed? 4.11 4.54 4.98 5.13
You are making a heavy lift with the jumbo boom. Your vessel displaces 7940 T. The 45-ton weight is on the pier and its center is 60' to starboard of the centerline. The head of the boom is 110' above the base line and the center of gravity of the lift when stowed on deck will be 50' above the base line. As the jumbo boom takes the strain the ship lists to 4.5°. What is the GM with the cargo stowed? 4.82 4.64 4.30 3.97
You are making a heavy lift with the jumbo boom. Your vessel displaces 8530 T. The 40-ton weight is on the pier and its center is 65' to starboard of the centerline. The head of the boom is 115' above the base line and the center of gravity of the lift when stowed on deck will be 50' above the base line. As the jumbo boom takes the strain the ship lists to 5°. What is the GM with the cargo stowed? 2.96 ft 3.18 ft 3.46 ft 3.77 ft
You are making a heavy lift with the jumbo boom. Your vessel displaces 8390 T. The 40 ton weight is on the pier and its center is 55' to starboard of the centerline. The head of the boom is 110' above the base line and the center of gravity of the lift when stowed on deck will be 45' above the base line. As the jumbo boom takes the strain the ship lists to 3.5°. What is the GM with the cargo stowed? 4.58 feet 4.27 feet 3.93 feet 3.68 feet
A cargo of 60 tons is to be loaded on deck 20 feet from the ship's centerline. The vessel's displacement including the 60 ton cargo will be 6,000 tons and the GM two feet. The list of the vessel after loading this cargo will be . 5.4° 5.72° 6.12° 6.4°
A cargo of 30 tons is to be loaded on deck 30 feet from the ship's centerline. The ship's displacement including the 30 tons cargo will be 9,000 tons and the GM will be 5 feet. The list of the vessel after loading this cargo will be . 1.14° 2.05° 2.31° 3.40°
A cargo of 100 tons is to be loaded on deck 20 feet from the ship's centerline. The ship's displacement including the 100 tons of cargo will be 10,000 tons and the GM two feet. The list of the vessel after loading this cargo will be . 5.4° 5.7° 5.9° 6.1°
A cargo of 50 tons is to be loaded on deck 20 feet from the ship's centerline. The vessel's displacement including the 50 ton cargo will be 3,000 tons and the GM three feet. The list of the vessel after loading this cargo will be . 5.35° 5.80° 6.10° 6.35°
Your vessel is preparing to lift a weight of 30 tons with a boom whose head is 30 feet from the ship's centerline. The ship's displacement not including the weight lifted is 8,790 tons. KM is 21.5 ft, KG is 20.5 ft. The angle of list when the weight is lifted will be . 1.4° ro oo o o CO cn CO o
A cargo of 75 tons is to be lifted with a boom located 50 feet from the ship's centerline. The ship's displacement including the suspended cargo is 6,000 tons and GM is 6 feet. The list of the ship with the cargo suspended from the boom will be . 5.00° 5.40° 5.94° 6.50°
A cargo of 40 tons is to be lifted with a boom located 40 feet from the ship's centerline. The ship's displacement including the suspended cargo is 8,000 tons and the GM is 2 feet with cargo suspended. What will the list of the vessel be with the cargo suspended? 4.9° 5.2° 5.7° 6.0°
The purpose of the inclining experiment is to . determine the location of the metacenter determine the lightweight center of gravity location verify the hydrostatic data verify data in the vessel's operating manual
One of the main purposes of the inclining experiment on a vessel is to determine the . location of the center of gravity of the light ship position of the center of buoyancy position of the metacenter maximum load line
The TPI curve, one of the hydrostatic curves in a vessel's plans, gives the number of tons . necessary to change the angle of list 1° at a given draft necessary to change trim 1 inch at a given draft pressure per square inch on the vessel's hull at a given draft necessary to further immerse the vessel 1 inch at a given draft
You are scheduled to load 3200 tons of cargo, 45 tons of crew effects and stores and 259 tons of fuel. Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessel's mean draft in fresh water: 17'-00" 16'-09" 16'-06" 16'-04"
You are scheduled to load 4700 tons of cargo, 45 tons of crew effects and stores and 323 tons of fuel. Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessel's mean draft in fresh water. 19'-00" 19'-03" 19'-07" 20'-01"
You are scheduled to load 4700 tons of cargo, 45 tons of crew effects and stores and 323 tons of fuel. Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessel's mean draft in salt water. 19'-00" 19'-04" 19'-09" 20'-01"
You are scheduled to load 3700 tons of cargo, 45 tons of crew effects and stores and 427 tons of fuel. Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessel's mean draft in salt water. 17'-01" 17'-05" 17'-10" 18'-00"
You are scheduled to load 3700 tons of cargo, 45 tons of crew effects and stores and 427 tons of fuel. Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessel's mean draft in fresh water. 17'-01" 17'-00" 17'-10" 18'-00"
You are scheduled to load 3200 tons of cargo, 45 tons of crew effects and stores and 323 tons of fuel. Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessel's mean draft in salt water. 17'-00" 16'-10" 16'-07" 16'-04"
You are scheduled to load 3900 tons of cargo, 45 tons of crew effects and stores and 359 tons of fuel. Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessel's mean draft in fresh water. 19'-00" 18'-07" 18'-04" 18'-01"
You are scheduled to load 3900 tons of cargo, 45 tons of crew effects and stores and 259 tons of fuel. Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessel's mean draft in fresh water. 18'-06" 18'-02" 17'-11" 17'-08"
Your drafts are: FWD 21'-03", AFT 26'00". What is the KM based on the tables in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book? 25.1 feet 25.4 feet 25.7 feet 26.0 feet
Your drafts are: FWD 21'-03", AFT 21'09". What is the KM based on the tables in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book? 26.5 feet 26.3 feet 25.8 feet 25.5 feet
Your drafts are: FWD 18'-03", AFT 21'-09". What is the KM based on the tables in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book? 25.2 feet 25.6 feet 25.9 feet 26.3 feet
Your drafts are: FWD 17'-09", AFT 18'-03". What is the KM based on the tables in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book? 25.7 feet 26.0 feet 26.2 feet 26.4 feet
Your drafts are: FWD 17'-09", AFT 21'-03". What is the KM based on the tables in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book? 25.7 feet 26.0 feet 26.4 feet 26.8 feet
Your drafts are: FWD 21'-03", AFT 26'00". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the location of the center of flotation relative to amidships. 2.8 feet forward 2.1 feet forward 1.6 feet forward 1.9 feet aft
Your drafts are: FWD 17'-09", AFT 18'03". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the location of the center of flotation relative to amidships. 5.6 feet forward 5.1 feet forward at the center of flotation 0.8 foot aft
Your drafts are: FWD 26'-03", AFT 30'-08". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the location of the center of flotation relative to amidships. 2.8 feet aft 2.3 feet aft 1.9 feet aft 1.5 feet aft
Your drafts are: FWD 25'-09", AFT 28'03". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the location of the center of flotation relative to amidships. 2.6 feet forward 2.1 feet forward at the longitudinal center 0.8 foot aft
Your drafts are: FWD 17'-09", AFT 21'01". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the location of the center of flotation relative to amidships. 5.1 feet forward 4.7 feet forward 2.6 feet aft 0.8 foot forward
Your drafts are: FWD 20'-08", AFT 25'03". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the MT1. 1130 foot-tons 1095 foot-tons 1070 foot-tons 1025 foot-tons
Your drafts are: FWD 16'-02", AFT 20'08". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the MT1. 920 foot-tons 935 foot-tons 960 foot-tons 980 foot-tons
Your drafts are: FWD 16'-02", AFT 18'02". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the MT1. 935 foot-tons 960 foot-tons 985 foot-tons 1000 foot-tons
Your drafts are: FWD 23'-03", AFT 27'01". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the MT1. 1050 foot-tons 1065 foot-tons 1090 foot-tons 1130 foot-tons
Your drafts are: FWD 20'-08", AFT 23'03". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the MT1. 1050 foot-tons 1065 foot-tons 1090 foot-tons 1130 foot-tons
Your drafts are: FWD 23'-03", AFT 27'01". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessels displacement if you are in fresh water. 12,550 tons 12,900 tons 13,200 tons 13,350 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 24'-09", AFT 27'02". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessels displacement if you are in salt water. 13,175 tons 13,350 tons 13,490 tons 13,620 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 24'-09", AFT 27'02". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessels displacement if you are in fresh water. 13,075 tons 13,350 tons 13,590 tons 13,700 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 23'-03", AFT 24'01". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessels displacement if you are in fresh water. 11,650 tons 11,800 tons 12,000 tons 12,250 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 23'-03", AFT 27'01". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessels displacement if you are in salt water. 12,750 tons 12,900 tons 13,150 tons 13,250 tons
Of the following, the most important consideration for a tank vessel is GM the vertical center of gravity the longitudinal center of gravity the stress on the hull
The normal tendency for a loaded tanker is to . hog sag have a permanent list be very tender
Which is the MOST important consideration for a tank vessel? GM The longitudinal center of gravity The stress on the hull The vertical center of gravity
To increase the extent of flooding your vessel can suffer without sinking, you could . ballast the vessel increase reserve buoyancy lower the center of gravity raise the center of gravity
Freeboard is measured from the upper edge of the . bulwark deck line gunwale bar sheer strake
The distance between the waterline of a vessel and the main deck is called draft freeboard buoyancy camber
The amount of freeboard which a ship possesses has a tremendous effect on its . initial stability free surface permeability stability at large angles of inclination
A vessel's LCG is determined by dividing the total longitudinal moment summations by displacement dividing the total vertical moment summations by displacement multiplying the MT1 by the longitudinal moments subtracting LCF from LCB
Reserve buovancv is . also called GM the void portion of the ship below the waterline which is enclosed and watertight affected bv the number of transverse watertight bulkheads the watertight portion of a vessel above the waterline
The volume of a vessel's intact watertight space above the waterline is its . free surface marginal stability reserve buoyancy freeboard
Which is an indication of reserve buoyancy? Metacentric height Righting moment Rolling period Freeboard
Reserve buoyancy is . the watertight part of a vessel above the waterline the void portion of the ship below the waterline which is enclosed and watertight transverse watertight bulkheads a measure of metacentric height
Intact buoyancy is a term used to describe . the volume of all intact spaces above the waterline an intact space below the surface of a flooded area an intact space which can be flooded without causing a ship to sink the space at which all the vertical upward forces of buoyancy are considered to be concentrated
Reserve buovancv is the . unoccupied space below the waterline volume of intact space above the waterline excess of the buovant force over the gravitv force difference in the buovant force in salt and fresh waters
Which action will affect the trim of a vessel? Moving high weights lower Adding weight at the tipping center Moving a weight forward All of the above
The ship's tanks most effective for trimming are the . deeps domestics peaks settlers
Those ship's tanks that are particularly important for trimming the ship are the domestics settlers deeps peaks
Buoyancy is a measure of the ship's ability to float deadweight freeboard midships strength
The center of volume of the immersed portion of the hull is called the center of buoyancy center of flotation center of gravity tipping center
The center of the underwater volume of a floating vessel is the . center of buoyancy center of flotation uncorrected height of the center of gravity of the vessel center of gravity of the vessel corrected for free surface effects
The percentage of the total surface area or volume of a flooded compartment that can be occupied by water caused by damage is known as one compartment standard center of flotation permeability form gain
What is NOT a motion of the vessel? Pitch Roll Trim Yaw
The center of flotation of a vessel is the center of volume of the immersed portion of the vessel the center of gravity of the water plane that point at which all the vertical downward forces of weight are considered to be concentrated that point at which all the vertical upward forces of buoyancy are considered to be concentrated
The center of flotation of a vessel is the point in the water plane about which the vessel lists and trims which coincides with the center of buoyancy which, in the absence of external forces, is always vertically aligned with the center of gravity which is shown in the hydrostatic tables as VCB
A vessel is described as a two compartment vessel when it has no more than two compartments has two compartments in addition to the engine room will sink if any two compartments are flooded will float if any two adjacent compartments are flooded
The maximum length allowed between main, transverse bulkheads on a vessel is referred to as the floodable length factor of subdivision compartment standard permissible length
The change in trim of a vessel may be found by . dividing the trim moments by MT1 subtracting the LCF from the LCB looking at the Hydrostatic Properties Table for the draft of the vessel dividing longitudinal moments by the displacement
Which would NOT provide extra buoyancy for a vessel with no sheer? Lighter draft Raised fo'c'sle head Raised poop Higher bulwark
The "trimming arm" of a vessel is the horizontal distance between the LCB and LCF LCF and LCG LHA and LCG LCB and LCG
When a vessel's LCG is aft of her LCB, the vessel will . trim by the stern trim by the head be on an even keel be tender
The two points that act together to trim a ship are the . LCF and LCB LCG and LCB metacenter and LCG VCG and LCG
Your vessel has a midships engine room and the cargo is concentrated in the end holds. The vessel is sagging with tensile stress on main deck sagging with compressive stress on main deck hogging with tensile stress on main deck hogging with compressive stress on main deck
If a vessel is sagging, what kind of stress is placed on the sheer strake? Compression Tension Thrust Racking
When a vessel is stationary and in a hogging condition, the main deck is under . compression stress tension stress shear stress racking stress
If a vessel is sagging, which kind of stress is placed on the sheer strake? Compression Racking Tension Thrust
When a vessel is stationary and in a hogging condition, the main deck is under . compression stress racking stress shear stress tension stress
When a vessel is stationary and in a hogging condition, the main deck is under which type of stress? compression tension shear racking
A ship's forward draft is 22'-04" and its after draft is 24'-00". The draft amidships is 23'-04". This indicates a concentration of weight . at the bow in the lower holds amidships at the ends
The forward draft of your ship is 27'11" and the after draft is 29'-03". The draft amidships is 28'-05". Your vessel is . hogged sagged listed trimmed by the head
A ship's forward draft is 22'-04" and its after draft is 23'-00". The draft amidships is 23'-04". This indicates a concentration of weight . at the bow in the lower holds amidships at the ends
The change in weight (measured in tons) which causes a draft change of one inch is . MT1 inch ML1 inch MH1 inch TPI
The time required to incline from port to starboard and back to port again is called . initial stability range of stability inclining moment rolling period
The time required to incline from bow down to stern down and return to bow down again is called . rolling period amplitude moment inclining moment pitching period
The tendency of a vessel to return to its original trim after being inclined by an external force is . equilibrium buoyancy transverse stability longitudinal stability
The enclosed area defined as the intersection of the surface of the water and the hull of a vessel is the amidships plane longitudinal reference plane baseline water plane
The water plane area is described as the intersection of the surface of the water in which a vessel floats and the baseline vertical reference plane hull horizontal reference plane
The geometric center of the water plane area is called the . center of buoyancy center of gravity metacenter center of flotation
The center of flotation of a vessel is the geometric center of the underwater volume above water volume amidships section water plane area
Aboard a vessel, multiplying a load's weight by the distance of the load's center of gravity from the centerline results in the load's . TCG transverse moment righting moment transverse free surface moment
The result of multiplying a weight by a distance is a . moment force couple center of gravity location
A moment is obtained by multiplying a force by its . couple lever arm moment of inertia point of application
Aboard a vessel, dividing the sum of the longitudinal moments by the total weight yields the vessel's inclining moments righting moments vertical moments longitudinal position of the center of gravity
A vessel is inclined at an angle of loll. In the absence of external forces, the righting arm (GZ) is . positive negative zero vertical
A tank with internal dimensions of 40 feet X 20 feet X 12 feet is pressed with fuel oil weighing 54 pounds per cubic foot. What is the weight, in short tons, of the liquid? 518.4 short tons 259.2 short tons 135.0 short tons 11.3 short tons
The difference between the forward and aft drafts is . list heel trim flotation
A vessel is "listed" when it is down by the head down by the stern inclined due to off-center weight inclined due to wind
A vessel is "listed" when it is inclined due to an off-center weight inclined due to the wind down by the head down by the stern
In the absence of external forces, adding weight on one side of a floating vessel causes the vessel to heel until the angle of loll is reached list until the center of buoyancy is aligned vertically with the center of gravity trim to the side opposite TCG until all moments are equal decrease draft at the center of flotation
If a vessel lists to port, the center of buoyancy will . move to port move to starboard move directly down stay in the same position
When a vessel is inclined by an external force, the . shape of the vessel's underwater hull remains the same vessel's center of gravity shifts to the center of the vessel's underwater hull vessel's center of buoyancy shifts to the center of the vessel's underwater hull vessel's mean draft increases
Your vessel has taken a slight list from off-center loading of material on deck. The . list should be easily removed mean draft is affected vessel may flop vessel is trimmed
Your vessel has just finished bunkering and has a small list due to improper distribution of the fuel oil. This list will cause . a decrease in reserve buoyancy a decrease in the maximum draft the vessel to flop to port and starboard None of the above
If your vessel has a list to port due to negative GM and off-center weight, the first corrective measure you should take is to . move port-side main-deck cargo to the starboard side fill the starboard double-bottom pump water from the port doublebottom to the starboard doublebottom pump water from the port doublebottom over the side
The difference between the starboard and port drafts caused by shifting a weight transversely is . list heel trim flotation
During cargo operations, your vessel develops a list due to the center of gravity rising above the transverse metacenter. To correct the list, you should . shift weight to the high side shift weight to the centerline add weight in the lower holds or double bottoms remove weight from the lower holds or double bottoms
Assuming an even transverse distribution of weight in a vessel, which condition could cause a list? Empty doublebottoms and lower holds, and a heavy deck cargo Flooding the forepeak to correct the vessel's trim Having KG smaller than KM Having a small positive righting arm
If your vessel will list with equal readiness to either side, the list is most likely caused by . negative GM off-center weight pocketing of free surface excessive freeboard
A vessel continually lists to one side and has a normal rolling period. Which statement is TRUE? The vessel has negative GM. The center of gravity is on the centerline. The list can be corrected by reducing KM. The vessel has asymmetrical weight distribution.
With no environmental forces acting on the vessel, the center of gravity of an inclined vessel is vertically aligned with the . longitudinal centerline center of flotation original vertical centerline metacenter
With no environmental forces, the center of gravity of an inclined vessel is vertically aligned with the longitudinal centerline center of flotation original vertical centerline center of buoyancy
In the absence of external forces, the center of buoyancy of an inclined vessel is vertically aligned directly below the . center of gravity amidships station center of flotation geometric center of the water plane area
In the presence of external forces, the center of buoyancy of an inclined vessel is vertically aligned with the center of gravity metacenter center of flotation keel
With no environmental forces, the center of gravity of an inclined vessel is vertically aligned directly above the longitudinal centerline center of buoyancy original vertical centerline center of flotation
Aboard a vessel, dividing the sum of the transverse moments by the total weight yields the vessel's vertical moments transverse position of the center of gravity inclining moments righting moments
A vessel trimmed by the stern has a list drag set sheer
Using the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, determine the danger angle for permanent list if the KG is 25.0 feet and the drafts are: FWD 15'-04", AFT 15'-08". 12° 17° 20° 23°
The static stability curve for a given vessel peaks at 34°. For this ship, the danger angle for a permanent list would be about . 8.5° 17° o CO 51°
Using the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, determine the danger angle for permanent list if the KG is 22.4 feet and the drafts are: FWD 15'-03", AFT 15'-09". 25° 33° 48° 72°
Using the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, determine the danger angle for permanent list if the KG is 22.2 feet and the drafts are: FWD 23'-06", AFT 24'-03". 26° 30° 34° 53°
Using the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, determine the danger angle for permanent list if the KG is 23.7 feet and the drafts are: FWD 28'-00", AFT 28'-06". 16° 21° 41° 56°
Using the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, determine the danger angle for permanent list if the KG is 22.4 feet, and the drafts are: FWD 19'-06", AFT 20'-00". 12° 24° 48° 52°
Using the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, determine the danger angle for permanent list if the KG is 21.8 feet and the drafts are: FWD 23'-05", AFT 24'-04". 37° 31° 26° 21°
Using the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, determine the danger angle for permanent list if the KG is 21.2 feet and the drafts are: FWD 27'-11", AFT 28'-07". o CN h- 52° 24° 19°
Using the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, determine the danger angle for permanent list if the KG is 21.8 feet and the drafts are: FWD 19'-05", AFT 20'-01". 52° 45° 31° 26°
An upright vessel has negative GM. GM becomes positive at the angle of loll because the . free surface effects are reduced due to pocketing KG is reduced as the vessel seeks the angle of loll effective beam is increased causing BM to increase underwater volume of the hull is increased
Your sailing drafts are: FWD 22'-04", AFT 23'-06" and the GM is 3.2 feet. What will be the angle of list if #3 starboard double bottom (capacity 97 tons, VCG 2.5 feet and 23 feet off the centerline) is filled with saltwater? (Use the data in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) Less than 1° 11°
Your sailing drafts are: FWD 24'-02", AFT 24'-10" and the GM is 4.6 feet. What will be the angle of list if #6 starboard double bottom (capacity 95 tons, VCG 2.6 feet, and 21 feet off the centerline) is filled with saltwater? (Use the data in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) Less than 1°
Your sailing drafts are: FWD 17'-07", AFT 18'-05" and the GM is 3.4 feet. What will be the angle of list if #4 port double bottom (capacity 140 tons, VCG 2.6 feet, and 26 feet off the centerline) is filled with saltwater? (Use the data in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) Less than 1°
Your sailing drafts are: FWD 18'-03", AFT 19'-07" and the GM is 4.3 feet. What will be the angle of list if #2 starboard double bottom (capacity 78 tons, VCG 2.7 feet, and 24.5 feet off the centerline) is filled with saltwater? (Use the data in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book)
Your sailing drafts are: FWD 19'-06", AFT 20'-10" and the GM is 3.3 feet. What will be the angle of list if the #2 starboard deep tank (capacity 100 tons, VCG 19.1 feet, and 24 feet off the centerline) is filled? (Use the data in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) Less than 1°
Your sailing drafts are: FWD 21'-08", AFT 22'-04" and the GM is 3.2 feet. What will be the angle of list if the #6 port deep tank (capacity 201 tons, VCG 11.4 feet, and 25.5 feet off the centerline) is filled? (Use the data in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book)
Your sailing drafts are: FWD 14'-04", AFT 16'-02" and the GM is 3.0 feet. What will be the angle of list if #5 port double bottom (capacity 195 tons, VCG 2.6 feet, and 18.5 feet off the centerline) is filled with saltwater? (Use the data in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 13° 16°
Your sailing drafts are: FWD 17'-07", AFT 18'-03" and the GM is 2.8 feet. What will be the angle of list if the #4 starboard double bottom (capacity 141 tons, VCG 2.6 feet, and 23.8 feet off the centerline) is filled with saltwater? (Use the data in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 10° 12°
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed. There is already 6280 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 25.5 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 25.3 feet KG 25.7 feet KG 26.0 feet KG 27.1 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed. There is already 3175 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 25.8 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 26.8 feet KG 27.3 feet KG 28.2 feet KG 28.5 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed. There is already 3485 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 24.4 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 25.1 feet KG 25.6 feet KG 26.0 feet KG 26.5 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed. There is already 4236 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 27.2 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 26.9 feet KG 27.3 feet KG 27.8 feet KG 28.1 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed. There is already 4260 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 25.8 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 24.6 feet KG 25.0 feet KG 25.4 feet KG 25.9 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed. There is already 2685 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 27.4 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 25.4 feet KG 26.0 feet KG 26.6 feet KG 27.2 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed. There is already 3315 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 27.0 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 26.2 feet KG 27.4 feet KG 28.6 feet KG 30.1 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed. There is already 4145 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 25.5 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 25.0 feet KG 25.6 feet KG 26.2 feet KG 26.8 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed. There is already 3224 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 29.8 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 27.2 feet KG 27.8 feet KG 28.4 feet KG 29.0 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed. There is already 6422 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 26.6 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 24.9 feet KG 25.5 feet KG 26.1 feet KG 28.9 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed. There is already 2464 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 27.3 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 27.0 feet KG 27.8 feet KG 28.6 feet KG 29.8 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed. There is already 3284 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 26.4 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 25.0 feet KG 25.5 feet KG 26.1 feet KG 26.7 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed. There is already 4184 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 27.8 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 25.8 feet KG 26.6 feet KG 27.2 feet KG 28.0 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed. There is already 2865 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 27.8 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 26.2 feet KG 27.4 feet KG 28.5 feet KG 29.5 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed. There is already 3684 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 28.4 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 27.0 feet KG 27.6 feet KG 28.2 feet KG 28.8 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 2.6 feet 2.8 feet 3.1 feet 4.3 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 7.9 feet 7.3 feet 6.4 feet 4.3 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 6.1 feet 5.8 feet 5.4 feet 4.9 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 5.1 feet 4.9 feet 2.9 feet 2.5 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 2.8 feet 4.6 feet 6.8 feet 7.1 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 7.7 feet 9.1 feet 9.9 feet 10.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 4.0 feet 5.6 feet 6.0 feet 6.8 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 3.9 feet 4.3 feet 4.7 feet 5.1 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 4.0 feet 5.6 feet 6.0 feet 6.8 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 4.0 feet 5.6 feet 6.0 feet 6.8 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 4.0 feet 5.6 feet 6.0 feet 6.8 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 7.7 feet 9.1 feet 9.9 feet 10.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 7.7 feet 9.1 feet 9.9 feet 10.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 7.7 feet 9.1 feet 9.9 feet 10.7 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 3.9 feet 4.3 feet 4.7 feet 5.1 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG FP of the liquid load. 271.2 ft 260.3 ft 251.9 ft 247.2 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG FP of the liquid load. 262.3 ft 264.9 ft 268.1 ft 270.3 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG FP of the liquid load. 280.2 ft 284.1 ft 285.3 ft 286.2 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG FP of the liquid load. 286.1 ft 282.7 ft 278.6 ft 272.4 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG FP of the liquid load. 270.6 ft 261.2 ft 250.5 ft 246.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG FP of the liquid load. 231.0 ft 234.3 ft 244.6 ft 251.5 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG FP of the liquid load. 271.2 ft 288.8 ft 292.3 ft 307.2 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG FP of the liquid load. 271.2 ft 291.0 ft 288.8 ft 305.3 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG FP of the liquid load. 271.2 ft 288.8 ft 294.4 ft 305.3 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG FP of the liquid load. 226.9 ft 238.3 ft 252.4 ft 268.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG FP of the liquid load. 229.8 ft 234.3 ft 246.8 ft 251.5 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG FP of the liquid load. 228.8 ft 238.3 ft 252.4 ft 266.5 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG FP of the liquid load. 229.8 ft 236.7 ft 244.6 ft 251.5 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG FP of the liquid load. 229.8 ft 234.3 ft 244.6 ft 253.5 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid loading shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG FP of the liquid load. 273.5 ft 288.8 ft 292.3 ft 305.3 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 6080 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 270.71 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 270.8 feet LCG-FP 269.2 feet LCG-FP 267.6 feet LCG-FP 266.7 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 6048 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 270.89 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 263.4 feet LCG-FP 266.6 feet LCG-FP 267.8 feet LCG-FP 269.4 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 6450 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 274.46 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 272.6 feet LCG-FP 269.8 feet LCG-FP 266.5 feet LCG-FP 263.8 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 4850 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 275.72 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 268.3 feet LCG-FP 265.4 feet LCG-FP 261.2 feet LCG-FP 256.9 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 5480 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 272.20 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 272.2 feet LCG-FP 268.3 feet LCG-FP 265.1 feet LCG-FP 263.4 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 4850 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 274.46 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 271.23 feet LCG-FP 270.96 feet LCG-FP 269.52 feet LCG-FP 267.88 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 5480 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 274.46 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 271.79 feet LCG-FP 272.87 feet LCG-FP 274.04 feet LCG-FP 275.13 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 6048 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 270.71 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 267.03 feet LCG-FP 267.92 feet LCG-FP 268.66 feet LCG-FP 269.94 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 6450 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 270.89 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 267.12 feet LCG-FP 268.48 feet LCG-FP 270.97 feet LCG-FP 273.06 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 4850 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 279.84 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 267.7 feet LCG-FP 268.4 feet LCG-FP 269.2 feet LCG-FP 270.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 5486 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 277.84 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 271.2 feet LCG-FP 272.1 feet LCG-FP 273.6 feet LCG-FP 274.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 6584 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 277.84 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 271.2 feet LCG-FP 272.1 feet LCG-FP 273.6 feet LCG-FP 274.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 6285 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 272.45 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 271.2 feet LCG-FP 272.1 feet LCG-FP 273.6 feet LCG-FP 274.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 5577 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 275.55 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 271.2 feet LCG-FP 272.1 feet LCG-FP 273.6 feet LCG-FP 274.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 4824 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 277.45 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 267.7 feet LCG-FP 268.4 feet LCG-FP 269.2 feet LCG-FP 270.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 7240 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 273.20 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 271.2 feet LCG-FP 272.1 feet LCG-FP 273.6 feet LCG-FP 275.3 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 3245 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 272.20 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 267.7 feet LCG-FP 268.4 feet LCG-FP 269.2 feet LCG-FP 270.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 3885 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 278.45 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 267.7 feet LCG-FP 268.4 feet LCG-FP 269.2 feet LCG-FP 270.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 5540 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 272.20 feet. See the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 266.5 feet LCG-FP 267.8 feet LCG-FP 268.4 feet LCG-FP 269.2 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 11'-01", AFT 15'-01". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.20 feet 0.92 foot 0.73 foot 0.61 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 18'-06", AFT 20'-06". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.10 feet 0.91 foot 0.72 foot 0.68 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 11'-01", AFT 15'-01". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 0.87 foot 0.98 foot 1.14 feet 1.25 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 11'-01", AFT 15'-01". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 0.68 foot 0.85 foot 0.97 foot 1.30 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 14'-06", AFT 17'-00". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 0.52 foot 0.70 foot 0.84 foot 1.10 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 13'-10", AFT 16'-04". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.30 feet 1.17 foot 1.01 foot 0.91 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 13'-10", AFT 16'-04". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.30 feet 1.07 foot 0.96 foot 0.73 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 11'-01", AFT 14'-07". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.30 feet 1.17 foot 1.06 foot 0.91 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 12'-07", AFT 16'-01". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.30 feet 1.07 foot 0.96 foot 0.82 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 21'-04", AFT 26'-04". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 0.54 ft 0.62 ft 0.80 ft 0.85 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 19'-00", AFT 24'-00". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 0.62 foot 0.80 foot 0.85 foot 0.99 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 20'-04", AFT 23'-06". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 0.62 foot 0.80 foot 0.85 foot 0.99 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 14'-04", AFT 18'-08". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.05 feet 1.15 feet 1.25 feet 1.31 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 15'-05", AFT 21'-03". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.05 feet 1.15 feet 1.25 feet 1.31 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 17'-05", AFT 19'-07". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 0.62 foot 0.80 foot 0.85 foot 0.99 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 14'-04", AFT 18'-08". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.05 feet 1.15 feet 1.25 feet 1.31 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 21'-04", AFT 26'-04". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 0.62 foot 0.80 foot 0.85 foot 0.99 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 17'-06", AFT 20'-04". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.05 feet 1.15 feet 1.25 feet 1.31 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 14'-04", AFT 17'-06". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.15 feet 1.25 feet 1.31 feet 1.48 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 6.3 ft Available GM 5.7 ft Available GM 5.3 ft Available GM 4.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 5.0 ft Available GM 5.4 ft Available GM 6.1 ft Available GM 6.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 3.2 ft Available GM 3.9 ft Available GM 4.8 ft Available GM 5.3 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 6.8 ft Available GM 5.4 ft Available GM 4.1 ft Available GM 3.6 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 6.9 ft Available GM 5.3 ft Available GM 4.1 ft Available GM 3.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.81 ft Available GM 4.69 ft Available GM 4.60 ft Available GM 4.28 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 3.51 ft Available GM 3.60 ft Available GM 3.98 ft Available GM 4.28 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.01 ft Available GM 4.16 ft Available GM 4.69 ft Available GM 4.81 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.07 ft Available GM 4.60 ft Available GM 4.69 ft Available GM 4.81 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 3.0 ft Available GM 3.7 ft Available GM 4.0 ft Available GM 4.2 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 3.5 ft Available GM 3.9 ft Available GM 4.3 ft Available GM 4.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 3.8 ft Available GM 3.5 ft Available GM 3.2 ft Available GM 2.9 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 3.8 ft Available GM 3.6 ft Available GM 3.3 ft Available GM 3.1 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.3 ft Available GM 4.1 ft Available GM 3.9 ft Available GM 3.6 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.2 ft Available GM 3.9 ft Available GM 3.7 ft Available GM 3.5 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 5.26 ft Available GM 4.24 ft Available GM 4.11 ft Available GM 4.01 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 5.26 ft Available GM 4.24 ft Available GM 4.11 ft Available GM 4.01 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 6.8 ft Available GM 5.4 ft Available GM 4.1 ft Available GM 3.6 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 6.9 ft Available GM 5.3 ft Available GM 4.1 ft Available GM 3.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 5.0 ft Available GM 5.4 ft Available GM 6.1 ft Available GM 6.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 2.8 ft Available GM 3.2 ft Available GM 3.5 ft Available GM 3.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 2.4 ft Available GM 3.2 ft Available GM 3.5 ft Available GM 3.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 2.8 ft Available GM 3.2 ft Available GM 3.5 ft Available GM 3.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 2.8 ft Available GM 3.2 ft Available GM 3.5 ft Available GM 3.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 2.8 ft Available GM 3.2 ft Available GM 3.5 ft Available GM 3.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.1 ft Available GM 4.3 ft Available GM 4.7 ft Available GM 5.1 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.1 ft Available GM 4.3 ft Available GM 4.7 ft Available GM 5.1 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.1 ft Available GM 4.3 ft Available GM 4.7 ft Available GM 5.1 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.1 ft Available GM 4.3 ft Available GM 4.7 ft Available GM 5.1 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.3 ft Available GM 4.7 ft Available GM 5.1 ft Available GM 5.5 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 08'-11.5", AFT 15'-11.5". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items listed will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 2.15 feet 2.05 feet 1.95 feet 1.75 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 08'-11.5", AFT 15'-11.5". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items listed will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 3.15 feet 3.00 feet 2.90 feet 2.80 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 08'-11.5", AFT 15'-11.5". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items listed will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 3.10 feet 2.45 feet 2.00 feet 1.50 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 08'-11.5", AFT 15'-11.5". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items listed will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 2.85 feet 2.65 feet 2.36 feet 2.15 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 08'-11.5", AFT 15'-11.5". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items listed will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 2.20 feet 2.00 feet 1.80 feet 1.65 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-00", AFT 15'-11.5". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items listed will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 1.80 feet 1.89 feet 1.98 feet 2.05 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-00", AFT 15'-11.5". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items listed will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 1.80 feet 1.89 feet 1.98 feet 2.05 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-00", AFT 15'-11.5". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items listed will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 2.49 feet 2.38 feet 2.27 feet 2.05 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-00", AFT 15'-11.5". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items listed will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 1.82 feet 1.96 feet 2.05 feet 2.17 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-00", AFT 15'-11". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items listed will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 2.82 feet 2.97 feet 3.15 feet 3.24 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-00", AFT 15'-11". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items listed will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 2.62 feet 2.82 feet 2.97 feet 3.15 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-00", AFT 15'-11". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items listed will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 2.62 feet 2.82 feet 2.97 feet 3.15 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-00", AFT 15'-11". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items listed will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 2.62 feet 2.82 feet 2.97 feet 3.15 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-00", AFT 15'-11". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items listed will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 2.62 feet 2.82 feet 2.97 feet 3.15 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 08'-04", AFT 16'-08". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items listed will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 1.91 feet 2.09 feet 2.21 feet 2.48 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-10", AFT 15'-08". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items listed will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 1.91 feet 2.09 feet 2.21 feet 2.48 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 10'-04", AFT 14'-08". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items listed will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 1.91 feet 2.09 feet 2.21 feet 2.48 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 8'-04", AFT 15'-08". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items listed will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 1.77 feet 1.91 feet 2.09 feet 2.21 feet
You are on a Mariner class cargo vessel. Your drafts are: FWD 17'04", AFT 19'-04". You wish to increase the calculated GM of 3.0' to 4.2'. What tanks should you ballast? (Use the white pages in the Stability Data Reference Book.) Tanks: DB3, DB4 Tanks: DB6, DB3 Tanks: DB2, DB6 Tanks: DT7, DT8, DB3
You are on a Mariner class cargo vessel. Your drafts are: FWD 21'04", AFT 23'-04". You wish to increase the calculated GM of 4.8' to 5.8'. What tanks should you ballast? (Use the white pages in the Stability Data Reference Book.) Tanks: DB2, DB6 Tanks: DB6, DT7 Tanks: DB4, DB7 Tanks: DB2, DB5
You are on a Mariner class cargo vessel. Your drafts are: FWD 26'06", AFT 28'-02". You wish to increase the calculated GM of 2.7' to 2.9'. What tanks should you ballast? (Use the white pages in the Stability Data Reference Book.) Tanks: DB1 Tanks: DB1, DT1 Tanks: DB2 Tanks: DB1, DT1, DT6
You are on a Mariner class cargo vessel. Your drafts are: FWD 22'06", AFT 25'-06". You wish to increase the calculated GM of 4.8' to 5.9'. What tanks should you ballast? (Use the white pages in the Stability Data Reference Book.) Tanks: DB3, DB4 Tanks: DB5, DT6 Tanks: DB2, DB5 Tanks: DB2, DB6, DB7
You are on a Mariner class cargo vessel. Your drafts are: FWD 24'00", AFT 25'-08". You wish to increase the calculated GM of 3.0' to 4.1'. What tanks should you ballast? (Use the white pages in the Stability Data Reference Book.) Tanks: DB3, DT1A Tanks: DB2, DB6, DT6 Tanks: DB3, FB7, DT1 Tanks: DB4, DT6
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is partially loaded with a GM of 2.9 feet and drafts of: FWD 17'-10", AFT 19'04". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine what tanks you should ballast to increase the GM to 3.9 feet. Tanks: DB4, DT6 Tanks: DB3, DB5, DT8 Tanks: DB6, DT7 Tanks: DB2, DT1, DT6
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is partially loaded with a GM of 3.1 feet and drafts of: FWD 19'-06", AFT 21'04". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine what tank(s) you should ballast to increase the GM to 3.7 feet. Tanks: DT1 Tanks: DB3, DT8 Tanks: DB2, DB7 Tanks: DB5
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is partially loaded with a GM of 3.1 feet and drafts of: FWD 16'-00", AFT 18'04". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine what tank(s) you should ballast to increase the GM to 3.6 feet. Tanks: DB1, DT1A Tanks: DT6, DT7 Tank: DT8 Tank: DB3
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is partially loaded with a GM of 2.6 feet and drafts of: FWD 13'-07", AFT 15'01". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine what tanks you should ballast to increase the GM to 3.4 feet. Tanks: DB1, DB3 Tanks: DB5, DT1A Tanks: DB6, DB7, DT7 Tanks: DB4, DT8
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 920 tons 1120 tons 1245 tons 1545 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 451 tons 1126 tons 1451 tons 1726 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 1220 tons 840 tons 460 tons 344 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 1920 tons 1280 tons 895 tons 720 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 595 tons 870 tons 1200 tons 1350 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 444 tons 644 tons 1044 tons 1263 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 338 tons 309 tons 281 tons 263 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 189 tons 174 tons 158 tons No loading required
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 1292 tons 1248 tons 1211 tons 1172 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 696 tons 520 tons 473 tons 444 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 280 tons 395 tons 750 tons 990 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 395 tons 530 tons 750 tons 990 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 395 tons 530 tons 750 tons 990 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 395 tons 530 tons 750 tons 990 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 395 tons 530 tons 750 tons 990 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 1171.5 tons 1311.0 tons 1503.0 tons 1710.5 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 1171.5 tons 1311.0 tons 1503.0 tons 1710.5 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 1171.5 tons 1311.0 tons 1503.0 tons 1710.5 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 1171.5 tons 1311.0 tons 1503.0 tons 1710.5 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 1171.5 tons 1311.0 tons 1503.0 tons 1912.5 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 26'-09", AFT 28'-05" FWD 26'-05", AFT 28'-07" FWD 26'-04", AFT 28'-10" FWD 26'-00", AFT 29'-00"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 22'-02", AFT 25'-08" FWD 21'-07", AFT 26'-03" FWD 20-11", AFT 26'-09" FWD 20'-09", AFT 26'-11"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 17-11", AFT 22'-07" FWD 17'-09", AFT 23'-01" FWD 17'-05", AFT 23'-04" FWD 17'-02", AFT 23'-04"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 18'-05", AFT 21'-05" FWD 18'-00", AFT 21-10" FWD 18'-06", AFT 22'-01" FWD 17-10", AFT 22'-00"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 25'-07", AFT 27'-01" FWD 25'-02", AFT 27'-06" FWD 24'-10", AFT 27'-10" FWD 24'-08", AFT 28'-00"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 25'-02", AFT 29'-10" FWD 25'-06", AFT 29'-06" FWD 27'-10", AFT 26'-02" FWD 29'-11", AFT 25'-04"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 26'-03", AFT 27'-08" FWD 26'-08", AFT 25'-07" FWD 25'-06", AFT 26'-11" FWD 26'-11", AFT 25'-06"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 17'-06", AFT 24'-03" FWD 19'-03", AFT 22'-06" FWD 17-01", AFT 24'-08" FWD 21'-04", AFT 19'-07"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 26'-02", AFT 26'-08" FWD 25'-09", AFT 27'-02" FWD 25'-03", AFT 28'-09" FWD 24-11", AFT 29'-11"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 27'-01", AFT 25'-08" FWD 29'-09", AFT 25'-09" FWD 25'-09", AFT 30'-05" FWD 25'-06", AFT 30'-00"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 26'-09", AFT 28'-00" FWD 27'-00", AFT 27'-10" FWD 27'-03", AFT 27'-07" FWD 27'-06", AFT 27'-04"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 23'-03", AFT 27'-00" FWD 23'-07", AFT 26'-07" FWD 24'-01", AFT 26'-02" FWD 24'-06", AFT 25'-10"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 26'-06", AFT 28'-10" FWD 26'-10", AFT 28'-05" FWD 27'-00", AFT 28'-03" FWD 27'-03", AFT 28'-00"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 23'-03", AFT 27'-00" FWD 23'-07", AFT 26'-07" FWD 24'-01", AFT 26'-02" FWD 24'-06", AFT 25'-10"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 19'10.5", AFT 22'-11.6". Cargo was loaded and discharged as shown. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 20'-01.4", AFT 23'-00.6" FWD 19'-07.6", AFT 22'-10.4" FWD 19'-09.3", AFT 22'-08.7" FWD 19'-11.7", AFT 23'-02.5"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 21'09.5", AFT 22'-09.5". Cargo was loaded and discharged as shown. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 21'-06.3", AFT 22'-06.6" FWD 21'-11.3", AFT 23'-01.8" FWD 22'-06.6", AFT 21'-06.9" FWD 23'-00.2", AFT 22'-00.4"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 21'10.6", AFT 22'-11.6". Cargo was loaded and discharged as shown. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 22'-00.1", AFT 23'-00.1" FWD 21'-11.0", AFT 23'-01.2" FWD 21'-10.0", AFT 22'-10.0" FWD 21'-08.9", AFT 22'-11.1"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 21'06.5", AFT 23'-05.4". Cargo was loaded and discharged as shown. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 21'-07.1", AFT 23'-08.9" FWD 21'-05.9", AFT 23'-01.9" FWD 21'-03.0", AFT 23'-04.8" FWD 21'-10.0", AFT 23'-06.0"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 19'06.6", AFT 20'-05.6". Cargo was loaded and discharged as shown. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of The Stability Data Reference book to determine the final drafts. FWD 20'-06", AFT 21'-02" FWD 18'-06", AFT 19'-09" FWD 18'-10", AFT 20'-05" FWD 20'-03", AFT 21'-05"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 28'08", AFT 29'-05". Cargo was loaded and discharged as shown. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 28'-10", AFT 29'-04" FWD 29'-02", AFT 29'-07" FWD 29'-04", AFT 29'-04" FWD 29'-05", AFT 29'-08"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 28'04", AFT 31'-10". Cargo was loaded and discharged as shown. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 29'-01", AFT 31'-04" FWD 29'-05", AFT 31'-00" FWD 29'-08", AFT 30'-09" FWD 29'-11", AFT 30'-07"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD28'-04", AFT 30'-11". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 29'-01", AFT 30'-10" FWD 29'-03", AFT 30'-08" FWD 29'-07", AFT 30'-08" FWD 29'-08", AFT 30'-06"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD28'-08", AFT 29'-05". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 28'-09", AFT 29'-00" FWD 28'-07", AFT 29'-01" FWD 28'-05", AFT 29'-08" FWD 28'-04", AFT 29'-05"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 28'08", AFT 29'-05'. Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 28'-11", AFT 28'-11" FWD 29'-01", AFT 28'-09" FWD 29'-03", AFT 28'-07" FWD 29'-05", AFT 28'-05"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 28'04", AFT 29'-10". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 26'-04", AFT 30'-00" FWD 26'-06", AFT 29'-10" FWD 26'-08", AFT 29'-08" FWD 26'-10", AFT 29'-06"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 28'04", AFT 30'-08". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 29'-01", AFT 30'-01" FWD 29'-03", AFT 29'-11" FWD 29'-05", AFT 29'-09" FWD 29'-07", AFT 29'-07"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 28'04", AFT 29'-10". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 27'-01", AFT 29'-11" FWD 27'-03", AFT 29'-09" FWD 27'-05", AFT 29'-07" FWD 27'-07", AFT 29'-05"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 29'06", AFT 29'-02". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 29'-07", AFT 29'-08" FWD 29'-05", AFT 29'-10" FWD 29'-03", AFT 30'-00" FWD 29'-01", AFT 30'-02"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 18'05", AFT 20'-11". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 18'-07", AFT 20'-11" FWD 18'-09", AFT 20'-09" FWD 18'-11", AFT 20'-07" FWD 19'-01", AFT 20'-05"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 18'06", AFT 21'-10". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 18'-06", AFT 21'-06" FWD 18'-08", AFT 21'-04" FWD 18'-10", AFT 21'-02" FWD 19'-00", AFT 21'-00"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 17'10", AFT 19'-06". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 16'-10", AFT 21'-02" FWD 17'-00", AFT 21'-00" FWD 17'-02", AFT 20'-10" FWD 17'-04", AFT 20'-08"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 18'10", AFT 18'-06". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 18'-00", AFT 19'-06" FWD 18'-02", AFT 19'-04" FWD 18'-04", AFT 19'-02" FWD 18'-06", AFT 19'-00"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 18'06", AFT 20'-10". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 18'-11", AFT 20'-02" FWD 19'-01", AFT 20'-00" FWD 19'-03", AFT 19'-10" FWD 19'-05", AFT 19'-08"
The maximum draft of the SS AMERICAN MARINER cannot exceed 30'-01" in order to cross a bar. The present drafts are: FWD 29'-04", AFT 30'-06". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum amount of sea water to ballast the forepeak to achieve this condition. 97 tons 100 tons 103 tons 106 tons
The draft of the SS AMERICAN MARINER cannot exceed 23'-06" in order to cross a bar. The present drafts are: FWD 22'-03", AFT 24'-00". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum amount of sea water to ballast the forepeak to achieve this condition. 77 tons 96 tons 120 tons 124 tons
The maximum draft of the SS AMERICAN MARINER cannot exceed 28'-08" in order to cross a bar. The present drafts are: FWD 28'-00", AFT 29'-00". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum amount of sea water to ballast the forepeak to achieve this condition. 44.4 tons 58.0 tons 76.7 tons 116.0 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 29'-04", AFT 30'-06". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 101.6 tons of seawater. FWD 29'-04.5", AFT 30'-07.5" FWD 29'-07.6", AFT 30'-05.0" FWD 29'-04.5", AFT 30'-10.0" FWD 30'-00.8", AFT 30'-01.0"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 28'-00", AFT 29'-00". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 81.05 tons of seawater. FWD 28'-06.2", AFT 28'-06.2" FWD 28'-06.3", AFT 28'-08.0" FWD 28'-07.3", AFT 28'-07.8" FWD 28'-10.0", AFT 28'-08.0"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 22'-03", AFT 24'-00". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 100.7 tons of seawater. FWD 23'-00.3", AFT 23'-05.0" FWD 23'-01.0", AFT 23'-05.7" FWD 22'-11.3", AFT 23'-04.0" FWD 22'-10.3", AFT 23'-06.0"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 28'-00", AFT 30'-04". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 110.8 tons of seawater. FWD 28'-08.2", AFT 29'-11.6" FWD 28'-09.0", AFT 29' 11.0" FWD 28'-09.8", AFT 29' 10.4" FWD 28'-10.6", AFT 29' 09.8"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 26'-04", AFT 28'-08". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 101 tons of seawater. FWD 27'-00.6, AFT 28'-01.7" FWD 27'-01.2", AFT 28'-02.5" FWD 27'-01.8", AFT 28'-03.1" FWD 27'-02.4", AFT 28'-03.7"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 22'-03", AFT 25'-05". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 97 tons of seawater. FWD 22'-10.7", AFT 25'-00.9" FWD 22'-11.3", AFT 25'-00.3" FWD 22'-11.9", AFT 24'-11.7" FWD 23'-00.5", AFT 24'-11.1"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 18'-07", AFT 23'-03". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 92 tons of seawater. FWD 19'-04.9", AFT 22'-08.7" FWD 19'-05.4", AFT 22'-08.0" FWD 19'-05.7", AFT 22'-07.7" FWD 19'-06.3", AFT 22'-07.1"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 13'-05", AFT 21'-03". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 88 tons of seawater. FWD 14'-01.8", AFT 20'-09.3" FWD 14'-02.4", AFT 20'-08.7" FWD 14'-03.0", AFT 20'-08.1" FWD 14'-03.6", AFT 20'-07.5"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 25'-11", AFT 26'-11". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 83 tons of seawater. FWD 26'-05.6", AFT 26'-07.5" FWD 26'-04.3", AFT 26'-06.1" FWD 26'-06.8", AFT 26'-06.3" FWD 26'-07.7", AFT 26'-05.4"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 22'-03", AFT 26'-05". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 77 tons of seawater. FWD 22'-08.7", AFT 26'-02.2" FWD 22'-09.3", AFT 26'-01.6" FWD 22'-09.9", AFT 26'-01.0" FWD 22'-10.5", AFT 26'-00.4"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 16'-10", AFT 19'-04". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 73 tons of seawater. FWD 17'-05.8", AFT 18'-10.9" FWD 17'-06.2", AFT 18'-10.4" FWD 17'-06.8", AFT 18'-09.8" FWD 17'-07.4", AFT 18'-09.2"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 19'-04", AFT 21'-02". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 68 tons of seawater. FWD 19'-09.7", AFT 20'-10.0" FWD 19'-11.1", AFT 20'-09.4" FWD 19'-11.7", AFT 20'-08.8" FWD 20'-00.3", AFT 20'-08.2"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 15'-06", AFT 18'-06". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 62 tons of seawater. FWD 15'-11.5", AFT 18'-02.7" FWD 16'-00.1", AFT 18'-02.1" FWD 16'-00.7", AFT 18'-01.5" FWD 16'-01.3", AFT 18'-00.9"
What is placed on the underside of an inflatable liferaft to help prevent it from being skidded by the wind or overturned? Ballast bags A keel Strikes Sea anchor
Which topic is NOT required to be discussed at the pre-transfer conference? Identity of the product to be transferred Details of transferring and receiving systems Emergency shutdown procedures Estimated time of finishing cargo
A device fitted over the discharge opening on a relief valve consisting of one or two woven wire fabrics is called a flame . stopper screen filter restrictor
A tank vessel transferring nonflammable hazardous cargo in bulk must display warning signs. These signs must . be visible from both sides and from forward and aft indicate "NO SMOKING" be displayed only while transferring cargo and fast to a dock use black lettering on a white background
When should the emergency position-indicating radio beacon be activated after abandoning an OSV? Immediately After one hour Only when another vessel is in sight Only after sunset
After having activated the emergency position indicating radio beacon, you should . turn it off for 5 minutes every halfhour turn it off and on at 5 minute intervals turn it off during daylight hours leave it on continuously
If you have to abandon ship, the EPIRB can be used to . hold the survival craft's head up into the seas generate orange smoke seal leaks in rubber rafts send radio homing signals to searching aircraft
Each vessel in ocean and coastwise service must have an approved EPIRB. An EPIRB . must be stowed in a manner so that it will float free if the vessel sinks must be stowed where it is readily accessible for testing and use is a devise that transmits a radio signal All of the above
What should you do with your emergency position indicating radio beacon if you are in a lifeboat during storm conditions? Bring it inside the liferaft and leave it on. Bring it inside the liferaft and turn it off until the storm passes. Leave it outside the liferaft and leave it on. Leave it outside the liferaft and turn it off.
You are in a survival craft broadcasting a distress message. What information would be essential to your rescuers? The nature of the distress The time of day Your radio call sign Your position by latitude and longitude
When personnel are lifted by a helicopter from an inflatable liferaft, the personnel on the raft should deflate the floor of the raft to reduce the danger of capsizing inflate the floor of the raft to provide for additional stability remove their lifejackets to prepare for the transfer take in the sea anchor to prevent fouling of the rescue sling
When a helicopter is lifting personnel from a rescue boat, the other individuals in the boat should enter the water in case the person being lifted slips from the sling stand on the outside of the boat to assist the person being lifted remove their lifejackets to prepare for their transfer to the helicopter remain seated inside to provide body weight for stability
You have abandoned ship and after two days in a liferaft you can see an aircraft near the horizon apparently carrying out a search pattern. You should . switch the EPIRB to the homing signal mode use the voice transmission capability of the EPIRB to guide the aircraft to your raft turn on the strobe light on the top of the EPIRB use visual distress signals in conjunction with the EPIRB
As a vessel changes course to starboard, the compass card in a magnetic compass . first turns to starboard then counterclockwise to port also turns to starboard turns counterclockwise to port remains aligned with compass north
As a vessel changes course to starboard, the compass card in a magnetic compass . remains aligned with compass north also turns to starboard first turns to starboard then counterclockwise to port turns counterclockwise to port
As a vessel changes course to starboard, the compass card in a magnetic compass . first turns to starboard then counterclockwise to port also turns to starboard remains aligned with compass north turns counterclockwise to port
The heading of a vessel is indicated by what part of the compass? Card Needle Lubber's line Gimbals
The lubber's line of a magnetic compass . always shows true north direction indicates the vessel's heading is always parallel to the vessel's transom is located on the compass card
The lubber's line on a magnetic compass indicates . compass north the direction of the vessel's head magnetic north a relative bearing taken with azimuth circle
Error may be introduced into a magnetic compass by . making a structural change to the vessel a short circuit near the compass belt buckles All of the above
Which would influence a magnetic compass? Electrical wiring Iron pipe Radio All of the above
When a magnetic compass is not in use for a prolonged period of time it should . be shielded from direct sunlight be locked into a constant heading have any air bubbles replaced with nitrogen have the compensating magnets removed
A magnetic compass card is marked in how many degrees? 90 180 360 400
How many degrees are there on a compass card? 360° 380° 390° 420°
A vessel heading NNW is on a course of . 274.5° 292.0° 315.5° 337.5°
A vessel heading NW is on a course of . 274.5° 292.5° 315.0° 337.5°
A vessel heading SSW is on a course of . 202.5° 225.0° 247.5° 270.0°
A vessel heading SW is on a course of . 202.5° 225.0° 247.5° 270.0°
A vessel heading WSW is on a course of . 202.5° 225.0° 247.5° 271.0°
A vessel heading WNW is on a course of . 270.0° 292.5° 315.0° 337.5°
A vessel heading SSE is on a course of . 112.5° 135.0° 157.5° 180.0°
A vessel heading SE is on a course of 112.5° 135.0° 157.5° 180.0°
A vessel heading ESE is on a course of . 112.5° 135.0° 157.5° 180.0°
A vessel heading ENE is on a course of . 022.5° 045.0° 067.5° 090.0°
A vessel heading NE is on a course of 022.5° 045.0° 067.5° 090.0°
A vessel heading NNE is on a course of . 022.5° 045.0° 067.5° 090.0°
Which condition is necessary for a substance to burn? The temperature of the substance must be equal to or above its fire point. The air must contain oxygen in sufficient quantity. The mixture of vapors with air must be within the "explosive range." All of the above
Except in rare cases, it is impossible to extinguish a shipboard fire by removing the fuel interrupting the chain reaction removing the oxygen removing the heat
Which toxic gas is a product of incomplete combustion, and is often present when a fire burns in a closed compartment? Carbon dioxide Hydrogen sulfide Carbon monoxide Nitric oxide
The most likely location for a liquid cargo fire to occur on a tanker would be . in the midships house at the main deck manifold at the vent header in the pumproom
The ventilation system of your ship has fire dampers restrained by fusible links. Which statement is TRUE? A fusible link will automatically open after a fire is extinguished and reset the damper. Fusible links must be replaced at every inspection for certification. Fusible links are tested by applying a source of heat to them. Fusible links must be replaced if a damper is activated.
The ventilation system of your ship has fire dampers restrained by fusible links. Which statement is TRUE? A fusible link will automatically open after a fire is extinguished and reset the damper. Fusible links must be replaced at every inspection for certification. Fusible links must be replaced if a damper is activated. Fusible links are tested by applying a source of heat to them.
Fusible-link fire dampers are operated by . a mechanical arm outside the vent duct the heat of a fire melting the link electrical controls on the bridge a break-glass and pull-cable system
Fusible-link fire dampers are operated by . a break-glass and pull-cable system electrical controls on the bridge a mechanical arm outside the vent duct the heat of a fire melting the link
Automatic fire dampers in ventilation systems are operated by use of heat or smoke detectors C02 system pressure switches remotely operated valves fusible links
The midships house of your break bulk ship is constructed with an interior stair tower from the main deck to the bridge. Under what circumstances may the doors from each deck to the stair tower be kept open when underway? They are to be kept closed at all times. They may be kept open if the ventilation or air conditioning system is shut down. They may be kept open if they can be automatically closed from the bridge. They can be kept open if the Muster List ("Station Bill") has personnel designated to close them in case of fire.
In the event of a fire, the doors to a stair tower must be closed to prevent the spread of fire by . ventilation radiation convection conduction
Automatic fire dampers in ventilation systems are operated by use of a remote operated valve C02 system pressure switch fusible link heat or smoke detector
Fire may be spread by which means? Conduction of heat to adjacent surfaces Direct radiation Convection All of the above
Fire dampers prevent the spread of fire by . convection conduction radiation direct contact
Convection spreads a fire by transmitting the heat of a fire through the ship's metal burning liquids flowing into another space heated gases flowing through ventilation systems the transfer of heat across an unobstructed space
Radiation spreads a fire by transferring heat across an unobstructed space heated gases flowing through ventilation systems burning liquids flowing into another space transmitting the heat of a fire through the ship's metal
Blocking open or removing fire dampers can cause . fixed foam systems to be ineffective faster cooling of the fire the accumulation of explosive gases the fire to spread through the ventilation system
The spread of fire is prevented by cooling surfaces adjacent to the fire removing combustibles from the endangered area shutting off the oxygen supply All of the above
To prevent the spread of fire by convection you should . cool the bulkhead around the fire remove combustibles from direct exposure close all openings to the area shut off all electrical power
To prevent the spread of fire by conduction you should . cool the bulkheads around the fire remove combustibles from direct exposure close all openings to the area shut off all electric power
The spread of fire is NOT prevented by . shutting off the oxygen supply cooling surfaces adjacent to the fire removing combustibles from the endangered area removing smoke and toxic gases by ensuring adequate ventilation
What is required in addition to the heat, fuel, and oxygen of the fire triangle to have a fire? Electricity Chain reaction Pressure Smoke
All of the following are part of the fire triangle EXCEPT . electricity fuel oxygen heat
You will extinguish a fire when you remove . nitrogen oxygen sodium carbon dioxide
What, when removed, will result in the extinguishment of a fire? Nitrogen Sodium Oxygen Carbon dioxide
An aluminum powder fire is classified as class . A B C D
A magnesium fire is classified as class . A B C D
Fires in combustible metals, such as sodium or magnesium, are classified as class . A B C D
Fires of which class would most likely occur in the engine room of a vessel? Classes A and B Classes B and C Classes C and D Classes A and D
A fire starts in a switchboard due to a short circuit. This is which class of fire? A B C D
A fire in a transformer terminal would be classified as class . A B C D
Fires which occur in energized electrical equipment, such as switchboard insulation, are class A B C D
A fire in the radio transmitter would be of what class? A B C D
A class C fire would be burning fuel oil wood celluloid electrical insulation
What is the primary hazard, other than fire damage, associated with a class C fire? Possibility of reflash Electrocution or shock Explosion Flashover
A fire in a pile of canvas is classified as class . A B C D
A fire in a pile of dunnage would be classified as class . A B C D
A fire in trash and paper waste is classified as class . A B C D
Burning wood is which class of fire? A B C D
A fire in a pile of linen is a class A B C D
The class of fire on which a blanketing effect is essential is class A B C D
An oil fire is classified as class A B C D
A galley grease fire would be classified as which class of fire? A B C D
If ignited, which material would be a class B fire? Magnesium Paper Wood Diesel Oil
An oil fire is classified as class D C B A
Fires are grouped into what categories? Class A, B, C, and D Type 1, 2, 3, and 4 Combustible solids, liquids, and gases Flammable solids, liquids, and gases
Foam is effective in combating which class(es) of fire? A B A and B B and C
The vapor pressure of a substance increases with the temperature decreases as temperature increases is not affected by temperature may increase or decrease as the temperature rises
Which portable fire extinguisher should be used on a class C fire on board a vessel? Carbon dioxide Water (stored pressure) Foam Carbon tetrachloride
You have carbon tetrachloride as part of the cargo. If a fire breaks out in the general area, what is the major danger from the carbon tetrachloride? It will explode if exposed to a flame. Phosgene gas may be formed if it comes in contact with hot metal. It will burn rapidly once ignited. You cannot use water to fight the fire because it will react with the carbon tetrachloride.
Which statement describes the relationship between flash point and auto-ignition temperature? Both are higher than normal burning temperatures. The flash point is always higher. The ignition temperature is always higher. They are not necessarily related.
The "flammable limits" of an atmosphere are the . two temperatures between which an atmosphere will self ignite upper and lower percentage of vapor concentrations in an atmosphere which will burn if an ignition source is present upper and lower pressures between which an atmosphere will not burn two temperatures between which an atmosphere will burn if an ignition source is present
The explosive range of Bunker C mixed with air is . 0% to 1% by volume 1% to 5% by volume 5% to 10% by volume 10% to 20% by volume
The explosive range of Diesel Oil mixed with air is . 0% to 1% by volume 0.8% to 5.3% by volume 1.3% to 6.0% by volume 6.3% to 12.1% by volume
The flammable limit of methyl ethyl ketone is from . 1.8% to 11.5% 6.6% to 12.1% 9.6% to 15.1% 12.2% to 18.1%
The flash point of a liquid means the temperature . at which a liquid will give off flammable vapors at which a liquid will burn steadily at which a liquid will explode that a liquid must reach before it will flow readily
Which statement is TRUE concerning the "flash point" of a substance? It is lower than the ignition temperature. It is the temperature at which a substance will spontaneously ignite. It is the temperature at which a substance, when ignited, will continue to burn. It is the temperature at which the released vapors will fall within the explosive range.
You should be most concerned about a possible explosion or fire in fuel tanks . during fueling when the fuel first strikes the tank bottom during fueling when the fuel strikes fuel already in the tank when underway as the fuel is moved by wave action shortly after fueling when fuel vapors gather
The volatility of a flammable liquid is indicated by its . ignition temperature flash point flammable range conversion index
Spontaneous combustion is most likely to occur in . rags soaked in linseed oil overloaded electrical circuits dirty swabs and cleaning gear partially loaded fuel tanks
Spontaneous combustion is caused by . an outside heat source heating a substance until it ignites conduction of heat through a wall of material to the substance chemical action within a substance All of the above
Which substance might be subject to spontaneous combustion? Coal Scrap rubber Leather All of the above
What is the maximum oxygen content below which flaming combustion will no longer occur? 1% 10% 15% 21%
The lowest temperature required to cause self-sustained combustion of a substance independent of any outside source of ignition is called explosive range flash point ignition temperature combustion temperature
What is LEAST likely to cause ignition of fuel vapors? Static electricity An open running electric motor Loose wiring Explosion proof lights
Which may ignite fuel vapors? Static electricity An open and running motor Loose wiring All of the above
Storage batteries should be charged in a well ventilated area because they generate heat they emit hydrogen of the toxic fumes they emit they recharge faster in a well ventilated space
Spontaneous ignition can result from an unprotected drop-light bulb careless disposal or storage of material smoking in bed worn electrical wires on power tools
Why should foam be banked off a bulkhead when extinguishing an oil fire? To coat the surrounding bulkheads with foam in case the fire spreads To cool the bulkhead closest to the fire To prevent any oil on the bulkheads from igniting To prevent agitation of the oil and spreading the fire
The BEST method of applying foam to a fire is to . spray directly on the base of the fire flow the foam down a nearby vertical surface sweep the fire with the foam spray directly on the surface of the fire
As an extinguishing agent, foam conducts electricity should be directed at the base of the fire is most effective on burning gases which are flowing extinguishes by cooling oil fires below ignition temperature
Which statement about firefighting foam is TRUE? Foam conducts electricity. To be most effective, foam should be directed at the base of the fire. Foam is most effective on burning liquids which are flowing. Foam can ONLY be used to extinguish class A fires.
Which statement is TRUE about fire fighting foam? The air bubbles in foam act as an insulator in fighting a class C fire. The effectiveness of foam in forming a blanket over a burning liquid increases as the temperature of the liquid increases. Foam can be used to control gases escaping from compressed gas cylinders. Foam sets up a vapor barrier over a flammable liquid preventing flammable gases from rising.
Which statement is TRUE concerning the application of foam on an oil fire? It cools the surface of the liquid. It gives protection to fire fighting personnel against the heat of the fire. It forms a smothering blanket on the surface of the oil. It should be used at the same time a solid stream of water is being applied.
Foam extinguishes a fire mainly by cooling chemical action smothering inerting the air
How does foam extinguish an oil fire? By cooling the oil below the ignition temperature By removing the fuel source from the fire By excluding the oxygen from the fire By increasing the weight of the oil
Firefighting foam is only effective when the foam . penetrates to the bottom of the fire is kept saturated with low-velocity water fog mixes with the burning fuel oil completely covers the top of the burning liquid
Foam extinguishes a fire by smothering the burning material chemical combination with burning material absorbing the burning material organic destruction of the burning material
When used to fight fire, carbon dioxide . is effective if used promptly on an oil fire has a greater cooling effect than water is lighter than air is harmless to cargo and crew
CO2 extinguishes a fire by cooling smothering chemical action All of the above
Which extinguishing agent is most likely to allow reflash as a result of not cooling the fuel below its ignition temperature? CO2 Water stream Water spray Foam
When fighting a fire on a bulkhead using a portable carbon dioxide extinguisher, the stream should be directed at the . base of the flames, moving the horn from side to side, following the flames upward as they diminish top of the flaming area, moving the horn from side to side, following the flames downward as they diminish center of the flaming area, moving the horn vertically from top to bottom bottom of the flaming area, moving the horn vertically to the top following the flames upward as they diminish
The danger associated with using carbon dioxide in an enclosed space is . frostbite skin burns asphyxiation an explosive reaction
Which danger exists to people when CO2 is discharged into a small enclosed space? Damaged eardrums Electric shock Frostbite Respiratory arrest
Which statement concerning carbon dioxide is FALSE? It displaces the oxygen in the air. It cannot be seen. It cannot be smelled. It is safe to use near personnel in a confined space.
While you are working in a space, the fixed CO2 system is accidentally activated. You should . secure the applicators to preserve the charge in the cylinders continue with your work as there is nothing you can do to stop the flow of CO2 retreat to fresh air and ventilate the compartment before returning make sure all doors and vents are secured
Large volumes of carbon dioxide are safe and effective for fighting fires in enclosed spaces, such as in a pumproom, provided that the persons in the space wear gas masks persons in the space wear damp cloths over their mouths and nostrils ventilation system is secured and all persons leave the space ventilation system is kept operating
Which statement is TRUE concerning carbon dioxide? It is lighter than air. It is an inert gas. It is used mostly on class A fires. All of the above
Which statement is TRUE concerning carbon dioxide? It is heavier than air. It is non-conductive. It is used on class B and C fires. All of the above are true.
Which advantage does dry chemical have over carbon dioxide (CO2) in firefighting? Compatible with all foam agents Cleaner More protective against re-flash All of the above
What is an advantage of a dry chemical extinguisher as compared to a carbon dioxide extinguisher? It has a greater duration. It provides a heat shield for the operator. It is nontoxic. It offers lasting, effective protection against burn-back.
As compared to carbon dioxide, dry chemical has which advantage? Cleaner Effective on metal fires Greater range More cooling effect
An advantage of an ABC dry chemical over a carbon dioxide extinguisher is lack of toxicity the multipurpose extinguishing ability burn-back protection cooling ability
An advantage of a dry chemical over a carbon dioxide fire extinguisher is its greater range cooling ability cleanliness All of the above
Dry chemical extinguishers extinguish class B fires to the greatest extent by cooling smothering oxygen dilution breaking the chain reaction
The most effective extinguishing action of dry chemical is . breaking the chain reaction the CO2 that is formed by heat smothering shielding of radiant heat
Which statement describes the primary process by which fires are extinguished by dry chemical? The stream of dry chemical powder cools the fire. The dry chemical powder attacks the fuel and oxygen chain reaction. The powder forms a solid coating over the surface. The dry chemical smothers the fire.
Which statement concerning the application of dry chemical powder is FALSE? At temperatures of less than 32°F, the extinguisher must be recharged more often. When possible, the fire should be attacked from windward. The stream should be directed at the base of the fire. Directing the stream into burning flammable liquid may cause splashing.
Which statement(s) is(are) TRUE concerning the use of dry chemical extinguishers? You should direct the spray at the base of the fire. You should direct the spray directly into the fire. You should direct the spray at a vertical bulkhead and allow it to flow over the fire. All of the above
You are fighting a class "B" fire with a portable dry chemical extinguisher. The discharge should be directed at the seat of the fire, starting at the near edge to bank off a bulkhead onto the fire over the top of the fire at the main body of the fire
When electrical equipment is involved in a fire, the stream of dry chemicals should be . aimed at the source of the flames fogged above the equipment shot off a flat surface onto the flames used to shield against electrical shock
You are fighting a class "B" fire with a portable dry chemical extinguisher. The discharge should be directed to bank off a bulkhead onto the fire at the seat of the fire, starting at the near edge over the top of the fire at the main body of the fire
Carbon dioxide as a fire fighting agent has which advantage over other agents? It causes minimal damage. It is safer for personnel. It is cheaper. It is most effective on a per unit basis.
What is NOT a characteristic of carbon dioxide fire-extinguishing agents? Effective even if ventilation is not shut down Will not deteriorate in storage Non-corrosive Effective on electrical equipment
The extinguishing agent most likely to allow reignition of a fire is carbon dioxide foam water fog water stream
Fire extinguishing agents used on Class C fires must be . able to absorb heat water based nonconducting nontoxic
A foam-type portable fire extinguisher would be most useful in combating a fire in . solid materials such as wood or bales of fiber flammable liquids a piece of electrical equipment combustible metallic solids
Portable-foam fire extinguishers are designed for use on what classes of fires? A and B A and C B and C A, B, and C
Regular foam can be used on all but which flammable liquid? Motor gasoline Jet fuel Crude petroleum Alcohol
A stored-pressure water extinguisher is most effective against fires of class A B C D
Which type of fire is the foam (stored-pressure type) fire extinguisher effective on? Classes A & B Classes A & C Classes B & C All of the above
Dry chemical fire extinguishers are effective on which type(s) of fire? Burning oil Electrical Paint All of the above
An "ABC" dry chemical fire extinguisher would be LEAST effective against a fire in . a mattress spilled liquids such as oil or paint high voltage electrical gear a trash can
Why is carbon dioxide (CO2) better than dry chemical for fighting a class "C" fire? The dry chemical is a conductor. The dry chemical leaves a residue. CO2 will not dissipate in air. It takes smaller amounts of CO2 to cover the same area.
One disadvantage of using regular dry chemical (sodium bicarbonate) in firefighting is that . it can break down under high heat and emit noxious fumes it will decompose under prolonged storage and lose its effectiveness fire has been known to flash back over the surface of an oil fire it is ineffective in fighting fires in high-voltage electrical equipment
Dry chemical extinguishers may be used on what class of fires? A only B only B and C only A, B or C as marked on the extinguisher
Which extinguishing agent is best for use on a magnesium fire? Water Sand CO2 Dry chemical
If a powdered aluminum fire is being fought, the correct extinguishing agent would be . dry powder water fog CO2 steam
Which type of portable fire extinguisher is best suited for putting out a Class D fire? Dry chemical CO2 Foam Dry powder
Which extinguishing agent is most effective on a mattress fire? CO2 Foam Dry Chemical Water
The extinguishing agent most effective for combating wood fires is water carbon dioxide foam dry chemical
The most effective fire extinguishing agent to use on burning linen is water carbon dioxide dry chemical foam
On a bulk chemical carrier, water should NOT be used as an extinguishing agent to fight a fire if the water may come into contact with the chemical called . acrylic acid benzene oleum vinyl toluene
What would be the most effective agent to use to extinguish a fire in drums of flammable liquids stowed on the weather deck of a vessel? Carbon dioxide Foam Steam Water fog
Which extinguishing agent is suitable to combat a class B fire in an engine compartment? Carbon dioxide Dry chemical Foam All of the above
When choosing extinguishers to fight a Class "B" fire do NOT use carbon dioxide dry chemical foam (stored-pressure type) water (cartridge-operated)
Which type of portable fire extinguishers is NOT designed for use on flammable liquid fires? Foam (stored-pressure) Water (cartridge-operated) Dry chemical Carbon dioxide
A large oil fire on the deck of a ship can be fought most effectively with dry chemical foam high-velocity fog Water (cartridge-operated)
On a class "B" fire, which portable fire extinguisher would be the LEAST desirable? Carbon dioxide Water (stored pressure) Dry chemical Foam
When fighting an oil or gasoline fire in the bilge, which of the following should NOT be used? Foam Solid stream water nozzle All-purpose nozzle Carbon dioxide
A portable foam (stored-pressure type) fire extinguisher would be most useful in combating a fire in generators oil drums the bridge controls combustible metals
Which type of portable fire extinguishers is NOT designed for use on flammable liquid fires? Foam Dry chemical Water (cartridge-operated) Carbon dioxide
Portable foam fire-extinguishers are designed for use on class A and class B fires A and class C fires B and class C fires A, class B, and class C fires
What is the most important characteristic of the extinguishing agent in fighting a class "C" fire? Weight Temperature Electrical nonconductivity Cost
Any extinguishing agent used on a Class "C" fire must have which important property? Cooling ability Leaves no residue Penetrating power Nonconductivity
A fire in electrical equipment should be extinguished by using salt water foam low-velocity fog CO2
Which types of portable fire extinguishers are designed for use on electrical fires? Dry chemical and carbon dioxide Foam (stored pressure) and soda-acid Carbon dioxide and foam (stored pressure) Dry chemical and soda-acid
Which extinguishing agent is the best for use on electrical fires? Foam CO2 Dry chemical Water fog
Which types of portable fire extinguishers are designed for putting out electrical fires? Foam and water (stored pressure) Foam and carbon dioxide Foam and dry chemical Dry chemical and carbon dioxide
Which fire detection system is actuated by sensing a heat rise in a compartment? Manual fire detection system Automatic fire detection system Smoke detection system Watchman's supervisory system
Fire alarm system thermostats are actuated by . smoke sensors the difference in thermal expansion of two dissimilar metals pressure loss due to air being heated an electric eye which actuates when smoke interferes with the beam
The difference in water spray pattern between the high-velocity tip and low-velocity applicator used with the allpurpose nozzle is due to . a difference in water pressure the method of breaking up the water stream the length of the applicator All of the above
High-velocity fog . is a finer, more diffuse water spray than low-velocity fog requires that the water pressure be no greater than 60 psi produces an effective fog pattern no more than 6 feet beyond the nozzle extinguishes a fire by absorbing heat and reducing the supply of oxygen
The primary method by which water spray puts out fires is by removing the oxygen cooling the fire below the ignition temperature removing combustible material diluting combustible vapors
The spray of water in low-velocity fog will have . greater range than high-velocity fog lesser range than high-velocity fog about the same range as high-velocity fog greater range than a solid stream
A definite advantage of using water as a fire extinguishing agent is its characteristic of . alternate expansion and contraction as water in a liquid state becomes a vapor absorption of smoke and gases as water is converted from a liquid to a vapor rapid contraction as water is converted from a liquid to a vapor rapid expansion as water absorbs heat and changes to steam
Which extinguishing agent will absorb the most heat? CO2 Foam Water Dry chemical
The most effective cooling agent among those normally used to fight fires is . water fog or spray chemical foam mechanical foam carbon dioxide
An extinguishing agent which effectively cools, dilutes combustible vapors, removes oxygen, and provides a heat and smoke screen is carbon dioxide Halon 1301 dry chemical water fog
Which extinguishing agent will cool down a heated bulkhead in the least amount of time? Water stream Water fog or spray Steam Dry chemical
Which fire-fighting agent is most effective at removing heat? Water spray Foam Carbon dioxide Dry chemical
What are the most important reasons for using water fog to fight fires? Smothers burning surfaces, organically destroys fuel Cools fire and adjacent surfaces, provides protective barrier Reaches areas not protected by steam or CO2 smothering systems Allows fire to be attacked from leeward, saturates liquid surfaces
When using a high-velocity fog stream in a passageway, the possibility of a blow back must be guarded against. Blow back is most likely to occur when pressure builds up in the nozzle which causes a surge of water the only opening in a passageway is the one from which the nozzle is being advanced pressure in the fire hose drops below 100 psi a bulkhead collapses due to heat and pressure
What is an advantage of water fog or water spray over a straight stream of water in fighting an oil fire? It has a smothering effect on the fire. It requires less water to remove the same amount of heat. It gives more protection to fire fighting personnel. All of the above
Water fog from an all-purpose nozzle may be used to . fight an electrical fire fight a magnesium fire eliminate smoke from a compartment All of the above
The main advantage of a steady stream of water on a class "A" fire is that it . breaks up and cools the fire protects the firefighting crew removes the oxygen washes the fire away
What is the BEST conductor of electricity? Carbon dioxide Distilled water Fresh water Salt water
You are operating a fire hose with an applicator attached. If you put the handle of the nozzle in the vertical position you will . produce high-velocity fog produce low-velocity fog produce a straight stream shut off the water
If a firefighting situation calls for low-velocity fog you would . order the engine room to reduce pressure on the fire pump put the lever on an all-purpose fire nozzle all the way forward attach a low-velocity fog applicator with the nozzle shut down put the lever on an all-purpose fire nozzle all the way back
The 12-foot low-velocity fog applicator has a spray pattern 12 feet in diameter can be used in conjunction with both 1-1/2 inch and 2-1/2 inch allpurpose nozzles has a 90° bend at its discharge end has a screw thread end which connects to the allpurpose nozzle
To get low-velocity fog from an allpurpose nozzle, you would attach the bronze nozzle tip to the fog outlet of the nozzle attach an applicator to the nozzle in place of the bronze nozzle tip attach an applicator to the solid stream outlet on the nozzle simply move the handle to the vertical position on the nozzle
The all-purpose nozzle will produce a fog spray when you . pull the nozzle handle all the way back toward the operator pull the nozzle handle back to a position where the handle is perpendicular to the plane of the nozzle push the nozzle handle forward as far as it will go insert a fog applicator between the fire hose and nozzle
With an approved combination nozzle, low-velocity fog is produced by inserting an applicator in the nozzle putting the handle of the nozzle in the forward position directing a straight stream of water against the ship's structure the combination nozzle only when the water pressure exceeds 125 psi
One advantage of the "all-purpose nozzle" is that it . can fit any size hose converts a stream of water into a fog increases the amount of water reaching the fire can spray two streams of water at the same time
On the all-purpose nozzle, the position of the valve when the handle is all the way forward is . shut fog solid stream spray
When the handle of an all-purpose nozzle is in the forward position, the nozzle will . produce high-velocity fog produce low-velocity fog produce a straight stream shut off the water
When the handle of an all-purpose nozzle is in the vertical position and without an applicator, the all-purpose nozzle will . produce high-velocity fog produce low-velocity fog produce a straight stream shut off the water
When the handle of an all-purpose nozzle is pulled all the way back, it will . produce high-velocity fog produce low-velocity fog produce a straight stream shut off the water
A combination or all-purpose nozzle produces . low-velocity fog only a solid stream only a solid stream and foam a solid stream and fog
The high-velocity fog tip used with the all-purpose fire fighting nozzle should always be . attached by a chain coated with heavy grease to prevent corrosion painted red for identity as emergency equipment stored in the clip at each fire station
The spray of water produced by using the high-velocity fog position on an allpurpose nozzle will have . greater range than low-velocity fog lesser range than low-velocity fog about the same range as low-velocity fog greater range than a solid stream
Before inserting a low-velocity fog applicator into an all-purpose nozzle, you must . install the high-velocity nozzle tip move the handle to position 2 move the handle to position 1 remove the high-velocity nozzle tip
In setting the valves on a steamsmothering system on a tank vessel, the master control valve to cargo tanks should be . open and individual tank valves open open and the individual tank valves closed closed and the individual tank valves closed closed and the individual tank valves open
In the production of chemical foam by a continuous-type generator the maximum water pressure to be used is 50 psi the speed of foam production is slower at lower water temperatures each pound of foam powder produces about 800 gallons of chemical foam fresh water only should be used
When water pressure of 100 psi is used in conjunction with an inline proportioner for the production of the mechanical foam, a 5-gallon can of liquid foam will last . 1-1/2 minutes 2-1/2 minutes 5 minutes 15 minutes
Production of mechanical foam by a portable in-line foam proportioner increases the size of foam bubbles formed increases the rate of foam production improves the extinguishing properties of foam gives the nozzleman more freedom of movement, since it can be placed anywhere in the hose line
Compared to the amount of concentrated foam liquid used, the amount of low expansion mechanical foam produced is . 97 times greater 94 times greater 10 times greater 2 times greater
One gallon of low expansion foam solution will produce about 10 gallons of foam 25 gallons of foam 100 gallons of foam 500 gallons of foam
One gallon of high expansion foam solution will produce . 8 to 10 gallons of foam 25 to 50 gallons of foam 100 to 200 gallons of foam 500 to 1000 gallons of foam
Your tankship has 40 gallons of 6% foam concentrate aboard. Approximately how much foam solution can be produced from this supply? 200 gallons 420 gallons 667 gallons 986 gallons
When compared to low-expansion foam, a high-expansion foam will be wetter be lighter be more heat resistant not cling to vertical surfaces
When compared to a high-expansion foam, a low-expansion foam will be dryer be lighter be more heat resistant cling to vertical surfaces
When compared to a high-expansion foam, a low-expansion foam will be dryer be lighter be less heat resistant not cling to vertical surfaces
When compared to low-expansion foam, a high-expansion foam will be drier be heavier be more heat resistant not cling to vertical surfaces
Extra chemicals for producing chemical foam should be stored in a freezer in a cool dry place at a temperature not less than 80°F in open bins
Foam is a very effective smothering aaent and . it provides cooling as a secondary effect works well on extinguishing electrical fires can be used to combat combustible metal fires All of the above
One of the limitations of foam as an extinguishing agent is that foam cannot be made with salt water is heavier than oil and sinks below its surface is corrosive and a hazard to fire fighters conducts electricity
A crew member reports that the high-pressure alarm light of a low-pressure CO2 fixed fire extinguishing system is illuminated. The most probable cause of this condition would be that an air leak has developed in the tank the tank cooling system has malfunctioned the pilot cylinder discharge valve is leaking an excessive amount of insulation has been installed on the tank and piping
What would be a major consequence of the refrigeration system for a low-pressure CO2 fixed fire extinguishing system remaining inoperable? The entire charge might eventually be lost due to CO2 venting out through the relief valve. Liquid CO2 would vent out through the safety valve as the temperature increases. Excessive condensation inside the tank would freeze, causing a restriction in the discharge piping. The warmed charge of CO2 would not be effective in extinguishing a fire.
When a ship's low-pressure CO2 fixed fire extinguishing system is activated from a remote location, what determines the quantity of CO2 being released into a selected space? The number of discharge nozzles in the space determines the quantity released. The discharge will continue until the temperature of the space returns to its normal ambient temperature. The main CO2 tank is partitioned into sections that are individually designated for each of the protected spaces. A pneumatic timer controls each discharge selector valve, and is preset for each space.
The normal designed CO2 storage tank temperature and pressure associated with a ship's low-pressure CO2 fixed fire extinguishing system is approximately . 0°F at 50 PSI 70°F at 150 PSI 0°F at 300 PSI 70°Fat500 PSI
Which action is routinely performed at the annual servicing and inspection of a dry-chemical cartridge-operated portable fire extinguisher? Test the pressure gauge for correct reading. Weigh the cartridge. Replace the dry chemical. Pressure test the discharge hose.
Which action is routinely performed at the annual servicing and inspection of a dry-chemical cartridge-operated portable fire extinguisher? Insure the chemical is powdery. Replace the cartridge. Pressure test the discharge hose. Test the pressure gauge for proper operation.
When must a dry chemical fire extinguisher be recharged? After each use When the air temperature exceeds 90°F Every 6 months Every 12 months
In addition to weighing the cartridge, which other maintenance is required for a cartridge-operated dry chemical extinguisher? Weigh the powder in the canister. Discharge a small amount to see that it works. Check the hose and nozzle for clogs. Check the external pressure gage.
Recharging a previously used cartridge-operated dry-chemical extinguisher is accomplished by authorized fire equipment servicing personnel only replacing the propellant cartridge and refilling with powder puncturing the cartridge seal after installation recharging the cartridge and refilling it with powder
When dry chemical extinguishers are used to put out class B fires, there is a danger of reflash because dry chemical . is not an effective agent on Class B fires does little or no cooling dissipates quickly is rapidly absorbed by the liquid
A portable dry chemical fire extinguisher discharges by gravity when the extinguisher is turned upside down pressure from a small CO2 cartridge on the extinguisher air pressure from the hand pump attached to the extinguisher pressure from the reaction when water is mixed with the chemical
Which of the following statements is/are TRUE in regard to Ro-Ro vessels' spaces that are "specially suitable for vehicles"? The spaces shall be fitted with an approved fire or smoke detecting system. The spaces shall have designated smoking areas. The spaces are prohibited from being fitted with fixed CO2 fire extinguishing systems. All of the above
Which of the following is/are NOT required on Ro-Ro vessels, regarding spaces that are "specially suitable for vehicles"? The spaces shall be fitted with an approved fire or smoke detecting system. The spaces shall have designated smoking areas. The spaces shall be fitted with an approved fixed fire extinguishing system. All of the above
Which of the following statements is/are FALSE in regard to Ro-Ro vessels' spaces that are "specially suitable for vehicles"? The spaces shall be fitted with an approved fire or smoke detecting system. The spaces shall be fitted with an approved fixed fire extinguishing system. The installation of a water sprinkler extinguishing system is prohibited. All of the above
Which of the following statements is/are TRUE in regard to Ro-Ro vessels' spaces which are "specially suitable for vehicles"? The spaces shall be fitted with an approved fire or smoke detecting system. The spaces shall be fitted with an approved fixed fire extinguishing system. The Commandant may permit the installation of an approved water sprinkler extinguishing system. All of the above
Which of the following statements is/are FALSE in regard to Ro-Ro vessels' spaces that are "specially suitable for vehicles"? The spaces shall NOT be fitted with a flame detecting system. The spaces shall be fitted with an approved fixed CO2 fire extinguishing system. As an alternative to a fixed CO2 system, the Commandant may permit a water sprinkler system. All of the above
Which of the following statements is/are FALSE in regard to Ro-Ro vessels' spaces that are "specially suitable for vehicles"? The spaces shall be fitted with an approved fire or smoke detecting system. The spaces shall NOT be fitted with fixed CO2 fire extinguishing systems. The Commandant may permit the installation of an approved water sprinkler extinguishing system. All of the above
The safety discs on carbon dioxide cylinders are set to release at 2,700 psi. Under normal circumstances this pressure will be reached at a temperature of . 70°F 100°F 125°F 135°F
There are two disadvantages to CO2 as a firefighting agent. One of these is the limited quantity available, and the other is . the lack of cooling effect on heated materials that it cannot be used in a dead ship situation with no electrical power to the CO2 pump that it breaks down under extreme heat to form poisonous gases there is no effect on a class A fire even in an enclosed space
The C02 flooding system is actuated by a sequence of steps which are break glass, pull valve, break glass, pull cylinder control sound evacuation alarm, pull handle open bypass valve, break glass, pull handle open stop valve, open control valve, trip alarm
CO2 cylinders equipped with pressure actuated discharge heads will discharge automatically when the discharge valve is open the control box glass is broken pressure from the control cylinders is detected the control cylinders have been completely discharged
Spaces protected by a fixed CO2 system must be equipped with an alarm which sounds . for the first 20 seconds CO2 is being released into the space for at least 20 seconds prior to release of CO2 during the entire period that CO2 is being released if all doors and ventilation are not secured
Some spaces protected by fixed carbon dioxide systems are required to have audible alarms that begin sounding prior to the discharge of CO2. This time delay must be at least 20 seconds 40 seconds one minute two minutes
A safety outlet is provided on the CO2 discharge piping to prevent over pressurization of the space being flooded rupture of cylinder due to temperature increase over pressurization of the CO2 discharge piping flooding of a space where personnel are present
Before using a fixed CO2 system to fight an engine room fire, you must secure the engine room ventilation secure the machinery in the engine room evacuate all engine room personnel All of the above
The gross weight of a fully charged CO2 bottle in a fixed CO2 system is 220 lbs. When the bottle is empty it weighs 120 lbs. What is the minimum acceptable gross weight of the CO2 bottle before it should be recharged by the manufacturer? 200 lbs 205 lbs 210 lbs 220 lbs
The gross weight of a fully charged CO2 cylinder is 80 lbs. When the bottle is empty it weighs 60 lbs. What is the minimum acceptable gross weight of the CO2 bottle before it should be recharged by the manufacturer? 55 lbs 68 lbs 78 lbs 82 lbs
Fixed CO2 systems would not be used on crew's quarters or the paint locker spaces open to the atmosphere cargo holds the engine room
CO2 cylinders forming part of a fixed fire extinguishing system must be pressure tested at least every year 2 years 6 years 12 years
Fixed carbon dioxide extinguishing systems, for machinery spaces that are normally manned, are actuated by one control to open the stop valve in the line leading to the space, and the same control releasing the CO2 a separate control to release the CO2 two separate controls to release the CO2 three separate controls to release the CO2
In a fixed carbon dioxide extinguishing system for a machinery space, designed WITH a stop valve in the line leading to the protected space, the flow of CO2 is established by actuating . one control two controls three controls none of the above
Which of the following statements is true concerning the control activators, i.e., pull-handles, push-buttons or levers, for a space protected by a CO2 fixed fire extinguishing system? Only one control activator is required for discharge piping systems designed without a stop valve. Two control activators are required when a stop valve is installed in the main discharge line to a space. An alarm must sound for at least 20 seconds before CO2 is released into a space that is likely to be occupied. All of the above
A fixed carbon dioxide extinguishing system for a machinery space, designed WITHOUT a stop valve in the line leading to the protected space, is actuated by . one control two controls three controls none of the above
The carbon dioxide cylinders of a fixed fire extinguishing system may be located inside the protected space, if the quantity of CO2 required to protect that space is not more than 300 pounds 400 pounds 500 pounds 600 pounds
In a fixed CO2 fire extinguishing system where pressure from pilot cylinders is used to release the CO2 from the main bank of cylinders, the number of required pilot cylinders shall be at least . 2 3 4 6
When pilot cylinder pressure is used as a means to release the CO2 from a fixed fire extinguishing system consisting of four storage cylinders, the number of pilot cylinders shall be at least . 1 2 3 4
In a fixed CO2 extinguishing system where provision is made for the release of CO2 by operation of a remote control, provision shall also be made for releasing the CO2 from inside the engine room from the bridge from the cargo control station at the cylinder location
Which of the following statements is FALSE, concerning the regulations pertaining to the cylinder room of a fixed CO2 fire extinguishing system? The compartment must be properly ventilated. The temperature of the room should never exceed 130°F. The door must be kept unlocked. The compartment shall be clearly marked and identifiable.
When fighting a large fire on your vessel and attacking it from ABOVE the space on fire, it is important to rotate personnel, due to heat stress station personnel on the hot deck immediately above the fire stay low by crouching or kneeling on deck All of the above
When fighting a large fire on your vessel and attacking it from ABOVE the space on fire, it is important to not rotate personnel, as the consistent attack can extinguish the fire quickly. stand erect, to avoid the heat of the deck station personnel on the hot deck, immediately above the fire, to observe for its potential spread All of the above
When fighting a large fire on your vessel and attacking it from ABOVE the space on fire, it is important to rotate personnel, due to heat stress stand erect, to avoid the heat of the deck cool the deck directly above the space on fire All of the above
What is the minimum period of time that the air supply for a self-contained breathing apparatus is required to last? 10 minutes 15 minutes 30 minutes 45 minutes
A "fifteen-pound" CO2 extinguisher is so called because . there are fifteen pounds of CO2 in the container the container, when full, weighs fifteen pounds the pressure at the discharge nozzle is l5 psi the empty container weighs fifteen pounds
You can determine that a CO2 fire extinguisher is fully charged by looking at the gauge checking the nameplate data weighing by hand weighing on a properly calibrated scale
Portable CO2 fire extinguishers should NOT be used to inert a space containing flammable liquids due to the danger of . the CO2 being inhaled by personnel reflash of burning liquids vapor condensation on the extinguisher the discharge causing a static spark
You used a carbon dioxide (CO2) fire extinguisher but did not empty the extinguisher. You must have it recharged if the weight loss exceeds one percent of the weight of the charge five percent of the weight of the charge seven percent of the weight of the charge ten percent of the weight of the charge
Which is the proper method of determining whether a portable CO2 fire extinguisher needs recharging? Check the tag to see when the extinguisher was last charged. Release a small amount of CO2; if the CO2 discharges, the extinguisher is acceptable. Weigh the extinguisher and compare the weight against that stamped on the valve. Recharge the extinguisher at least once each year.
A carbon dioxide fire extinguisher should be recharged . at least annually whenever it is below its required weight only if the extinguisher has been used before every safety inspection
CO2 cylinders must be recharged when the weight of the charge in the cylinder is less than what percent of the stamped full weight of the charge? 80% 85% 90% 95%
Which portable fire extinguisher is normally recharged in a shore facility? Dry chemical (cartridge- operated) Water (cartridge-operated) Water (pump tank) Carbon dioxide
In continuous operation, the effective range of the 15 pound CO2 extinguisher is limited to . 2 to 4 feet 3 to 8 feet 9 to 12 feet 10 to 15 feet
When discharging a portable CO2 fire extinguisher, you should NOT hold the horn of the extinguisher because the horn . becomes extremely hot becomes extremely cold could come off in your hands is placed directly in the flames
How do you operate a portable CO2 fire extinguisher? Point the horn down. Turn cylinder upside-down. Break the rupture disc. Pull pin, squeeze grip.
In order to discharge a CO2 portable fire extinguisher, the operator must FIRST . invert the CO2 extinguisher squeeze the two trigger handles together remove the locking pin open the discharge valve
To operate a portable CO2 extinguisher continuously in the discharge mode . slip the "D yoke" ring in the lower handle over the upper handle reinsert the locking pin open the discharge valve invert the CO2 extinguisher
Weight is considered during the periodic required inspection and servicing of . CO2 (carbon dioxide) fire extinguishers foam fire extinguishers water (stored pressure) fire extinguishers All of the above
After using a C02 portable extinguisher, it should be put back in service if some C02 remains hydrostatically tested retagged recharged
A squeeze-grip type carbon dioxide portable fire extinguisher has been partially discharged. It should be labeled empty and recharged as soon as possible replaced in its proper location if weight loss is no more than 25% replaced in its proper location regardless of weight replaced in its proper location if weight loss is no more than 15%
A combustible gas indicator will operate correctly ONLY when the hydrocarbon content of the atmosphere is less than the U.E.L. atmosphere is deficient in oxygen compartment to be tested is free of CO2 All of the above
Which statement is TRUE concerning combustible gas indicators? One sample of air is adequate to test a tank. They do not work properly where there is a lack of oxygen. They will detect a lack of oxygen. They are calibrated to read the percentage chance of explosion.
Which statement is TRUE concerning a combustible gas indicator? Several seconds will elapse between the taking of a sample and the reading appearing on the dial. The instrument will operate in any atmosphere. Toxicity of the atmosphere is measured by the instrument. All of the above
While using a combustible gas indicator, if the hydrocarbon content of the atmosphere exceeds the U.E.L., the needle of the indicator will remain at zero without moving move to the maximum reading and stay there move halfway up the scale move to the maximum reading and immediately return to zero
The flammable limits of gasoline are 1.3 to 7.6 percent volume of air. You are testing a tank that contained gasoline by using a combustible gas indicator. Under testing, the tank sample caused the needle to move rapidly to 100 on the dial and remain there. What is the concentration of flammable gas? 0 1.3 to 7.6% over 7.6% over 100%
The flammable limits of gasoline are 1.3 to 7.6 percent volume of the air. You are testing a tank that contained gasoline by using a combustible gas indicator. Under testing, the tank sample registered 55 on the instrument's dial. What is the concentration of flammable gases? 0.7% 4.1% 5.5% 55%
You are testing a tank that contained gasoline by using a combustible gas indicator. Under testing, the tank sample caused the needle to move rapidly to 100 on the dial then fall to zero. What is the concentration of flammable gas? Less than the flammable range Within the flammable range Over the flammable range The explosimeter is defective and giving a false reading.
A combustible gas indicator meter is calibrated to read the percentage of vapor to oxygen the flammable limit concentration the autoignition concentration the lower explosive limit concentration
Combustible gas indicators measure the presence of combustible gas as a percentage of the . flash point upper explosive limit lower explosive limit fire point
When using the combustible gas indicator, a special filter for filtering the incoming sample must be used if the atmosphere being tested contains vapors of . sour crude leaded gasoline CO2 chlorine
A pumproom is suspected of accumulating gases after a ventilation machinery breakdown. Where should the combustible gas indicator case be placed when testing the pumproom atmosphere for combustible gases? In the lower level of the pumproom In the middle level of the pumproom In the upper level of the pumproom On the deck outside the pumproom
Which instrument is suitable for determining the presence of explosive concentrations of fuel oil vapors in tanks? A flame safety lamp A combustible gas indicator A liquid cargo meter All of the above
What is the best instrument for establishing a safe working area before welding in a confined space? An oxygen indicator A combustible gas indicator A combination combustible gas and oxygen indicator A flame safety lamp
While testing a cargo tank, your oxygen indicator reads 25% oxygen in the tank. You would then enter the tank safely suspect the accuracy of the reading ventilate the tank test for nitrogen
An oxygen indicator can be used to determine if there is . sufficient oxygen in a compartment to support life combustible gases present hydrogen gas present All of the above
The oxygen indicator is an instrument that measures the . amount of oxygen in the atmosphere of a confined space amount of combustible gas as a percentage of the lower explosive limit in a confined space concentration of CO2 as a percentage of oxygen in a confined space None of the above
What could result in an incorrect oxygen concentration reading on the oxygen indicator? Exposure to carbon dioxide for no more than 1 minute Exposure to carbon dioxide for more than 10 minutes Exposure to a very low concentration of sulfur dioxide for no more than 2 minutes None of the above
Which statement is TRUE concerning the oxygen indicator? Exposure to flue gas has no effect on the instrument. Only one level of the tested space need be sampled by the instrument. Prolonged exposure to CO2 can result in false readings. The instrument can detect hydrogen gas.
What can be used to measure the percentage of oxygen inside a chain locker? Flame safety lamp Combustible gas indicator Oxygen indicator H2S meter
Deficient oxygen content inside a chain locker can be detected with litmus paper a combustible gas indicator an oxygen breathing apparatus an oxygen indicator
Ambient air, which you normally breathe, contains what percent of oxygen? 6% 10% 15% 21%
After each reading of an oxygen indicator, the instrument should be purged with . CO2 fresh air the tested compartment's air water
When using the oxygen indicator, which reaction from the needle should you expect as a sample is drawn into the instrument? Rise to the correct reading and then, slowly fall to zero as the oxygen in the sample is consumed Move back and forth and finally stabilize at the correct reading after about 10 seconds Rise to the correct reading immediately and then rise slowly to a false reading as the operating temperature increases Slowly rise to the correct reading and then remain stationary
You are using an oxygen indicator. How long should you wait after the sample is drawn into the instrument before reading the meter? No wait is necessary, the reading occurs immediately. At least 5 seconds At least 10 seconds At least 20 seconds
If the meter needle of the oxygen indicator cannot be set to zero, what should be done? Replace the batteries. Check the sampling tube for blockage. Adjust the final reading by the amount the needle is displaced from zero. Replace the platinum filament.
A spanner is a . cross connection line between two main fire lines special wrench for the couplings in a fire hose line tackle rigged to support a fire hose None of the above
Fire hose should be washed with salt water and a wire brush caustic soap mild soap and fresh water a holystone
To lubricate the swivel or remove corrosion from a fire hose coupling, you should use . glycerine graphite kerosene fresh water and soap
What should be used to remove corrosion from the swivel on the female coupling of a fire hose? Bearing grease and a wire brush Talc and fine sandpaper Fish oil and a soft brush Fresh water, soap, and a stiff brush
A double male coupling is one that has left hand twist has inside threads on both ends has outside threads on both ends takes two men to operate
Which statement about stowing spare hose is TRUE? Fold the hose so that the male coupling is about 4 feet from the female coupling, then roll it up. Roll the hose starting at the female end. Roll the hose starting at the male end. Fold the hose into lengths about 6 feet long and then lash the folds together.
Why is spare fire hose rolled for storage? Water in the hose is forced out the end in the rolling process. The threads on the male end are protected by the hose. Rolling provides maximum protection against entry of foreign objects into the couplings. Rolling provides maximum protection to the outer covering of the hose.
The canvas covering of fire hose is called the . casing outer hose line cover jacket
When joining the female coupling of the fire hose to the male outlet of the hydrant, you should make sure that the . threads are lubricated nozzle is attached to the hose female coupling has a gasket hose is led out
To remedy a leaking fire hose connection at the hydrant, secure the valve and . replace the gasket in the male coupling reduce fire pump pressure replace the gasket in the female coupling rethread the male coupling
No outlet on a fire hydrant may point above the horizontal in order to avoid kinking the hose avoid personal injury during connection make connecting easier prevent spray on electrical equipment
The outlet at a fire hydrant may be positioned anywhere from horizontal to pointing . 45° upward vertically upward vertically downward all of the above
Fire hose couplings . are made of bronze, brass, or soft alloy metals should be painted red in order to identify hose lengths are specially hardened to prevent crushing should be greased frequently
What is the minimum number of people required to safely handle a 11/2 inch fire hose? 1 2 3 4
Which of the following statements is FALSE concerning the proper procedure in handling a fire hose? A 1% inch hose should be deployed with a minimum of a nozzleman and hoseman. The nozzleman should always hold the nozzle with one hand on top, to prevent kickback. Back-up hosemen should be positioned wherever the hose makes a significant turn. The fire hose should be partially charged before deploying it from the fire station.
Which of the following statements is FALSE concerning the proper procedure in handling a fire hose? A 1% inch hose should be deployed with a minimum of a nozzleman and hoseman. Back-up hosemen should be placed wherever the hose makes a significant turn. Use of a spanner wrench when attaching nozzles or additional lengths of hose is always critical. The nozzleman should always hold the nozzle with one hand on top, to prevent kickback.
What is the minimum number of people required to safely handle a 21/2 inch fire hose? 1 2 3 4
A fire hose has a . male coupling at both ends female coupling at both ends female coupling at the nozzle end and a male coupling at the hydrant end male coupling at the nozzle end and a female coupling at the hydrant end
A fire hose with a nozzle attached must be connected to each hydrant except when exposed to heavy weather or when the . fire hose might be damaged by cargo operations vessel is in port fire-main system is not charged fire pumps are used for purposes other than supplying water to the fire main
The danger of a charged hose left unattended on deck with the nozzle open is . the hose could burst the nozzle end will whip about causing damage or injury water damage to vessel's cargo or structure personnel might trip over the hose
What is the most vulnerable part of the fire main system? The fire pump Exposed hard piping The hydrant valve The fire hose
What does the term "head" mean when applied to a fire pump? Length of the discharge pipe Height of the discharge pipe Difference between the discharge and suction pressures Sum of discharge and suction pressures
Under normal firefighting conditions, approximately how far could a straight stream of water reach when the hose pressure is 100 PSI? 50 feet 100 feet 150 feet 200 feet
Approximately how far could a straight stream of water reach if the fire hose pressure is reduced to 60 PSI? 50 feet 100 feet 150 feet 200 feet
The primary function(s) of an automatic sprinkler system is(are) to extinguish the fire which triggers it limit the spread of fire and control the amount of heat produced protect people in the areas which have sprinkler heads alert the crew to the fire
A flame screen . permits the passage of vapor but not of flame prevents the passage of flammable vapors prevents inert gas from leaving a tank permits vapors to exit but not enter a tank
Fuel oil tank vents are fitted with a screen which will stop . oil from flowing out of the tank vent air from entering the tank vent vapors from leaving the tank vent flames on deck from entering the tank vent
On cargo and miscellaneous vessels what is NOT a required part of the fireman's outfit? Self-contained breathing apparatus with a lifeline attached Combustible gas indicator Rigid helmet, boots, and gloves Flame safety lamp
The lifeline which is part of a fireman's outfit must be . made of steel or bronze wire rope corrosion resistant not less than 50 feet in length All of the above
The letter and number symbols, such as B-II, used to classify portable fire extinguishers indicate the class of fire and size of the extinguisher class of fire and location aboard vessel extinguishing agent and relative size of the extinguisher extinguishing agent and location aboard vessel
The best method of extinguishing a class A fire is to . remove oxygen from the area cool fuel below ignition temperature smother with CO2 smother fire with foam
What is meant by the term "overhaul" in firefighting? Slow down the spread of fire by cooling adjacent structures Cover the fire with foam Smother the fire with a blanket or similar object Break up solid objects to ensure that any deep seated fires are extinguished
Overhauling a fire in the living quarters on a vessel must include opening dead spaces to check for heat or fire evacuation of the vessel sounding the "all clear" signal operation of the emergency generator
The straight stream capability of an allpurpose nozzle is used in fighting a class A fire to . shield fire fighters from radiant heat break up burning material get the most water possible on the fire drive heat and smoke ahead of the fire fighters
A large fire, involving class "A" material, has developed in the ship's galley. In combating this fire, you should . keep the galley door closed until all the class "A" material has been consumed by the fire have a hose team cool the galley door, then open the door and extinguish the fire using a type B-II extinguisher cool adjoining horizontal and vertical surfaces before opening the galley door advance the hose team into the galley without any preparatory action
Which of the following would be of immediate concern after discovering a large fire in the ship's galley? An adjacent storeroom, containing spare parts A storeroom directly above, containing combustible fluids An adjacent storeroom, containing mattresses and linen An adjacent storeroom, marked "Stewards Stores"
A class B fire is most successfully fought by . preventing oxygen from reaching the burning material cooling the burning material below its ignition temperature using the extinguishing agent to make the burning material fire-resistant using the extinguishing agent to absorb the heat
After extinguishing a fire with CO2, it is advisable to . use all CO2 available to cool the surrounding area stand by with water or other agents thoroughly ventilate the space of CO2 jettison all burning materials
Your vessel is equipped with a fixed CO2 system and a fire main system. In the event of an electrical fire in the engine room what is the correct procedure for fighting the fire? Use the CO2 system and evacuate the engine room. Use the fire main system and evacuate the engine room. Evacuate the engine room and use the CO2 system. Evacuate the engine room and use the fire main system.
When possible, what should be the FIRST step in combating a fire on deck resulting from a cargo overflow or a leaking cargo line? Blanket the cargo spill with foam. Prevent the spread of fire with a foam dam. Apply CO2 on burning fuel at its source. Shut off the transfer of cargo.
A fuel line breaks, sprays fuel on the hot exhaust manifold, and catches fire. Your FIRST action should be to batten down the engine room start the fire pump apply carbon dioxide to the fire shut off the fuel supply
When possible, what is the FIRST step in fighting an engine fuel-pump fire which results from a broken fuel line? Secure all engine room doors, hatches, and vents. Close the fuel line valve. Check the spread of the fire with foam. Cast the barge off the wharf.
A galley grease fire on the stove may be extinguished using . water foam the range hood extinguishing system fire dampers
If heavy smoke is coming from the paint locker, the FIRST firefighting response should be to . release the CO2 flooding system open the door to evaluate the extent of the fire enter and use a portable extinguisher secure the ventilation
A fire in the galley ALWAYS poses the additional threat of . contaminating food with extinguishing agent spreading through the engineering space causing loss of stability a grease fire in the ventilation system
The preferred agent used in fighting a helicopter crash fire is . CO2 dry chemical water foam
The primary danger in helicopter fires is . burning jet fuel running on to quarters or other areas loss of stability rotating and flying debris heat damage to helicopter structure
After extinguishing a paint locker fire using the fixed CO2 system, the next action is to have the space opened and burned material removed left closed with vents off until all boundaries are cool checked for oxygen content doused with water to prevent reflash
An important step in fighting any electrical fire is to . stop ventilation stop the vessel de-energize the circuit apply water to extinguish the fire
What is the MOST important consideration when determining how to fight an electrical fire? Whether the fire is in machinery or passenger spaces Danger of shock to personnel The amount of toxic fumes created by the extinguisher Maintaining electrical power
You are fighting a fire in the electrical switchboard in the engine room. You should secure the power, then use a portable foam extinguisher use a low-velocity fog adapter with the fire hose use a portable CO2 extinguisher determine the cause of the fire
If you have a fire in the engine room, your FIRST act should be to discharge the fixed CO2 system into the engine room secure the fuel supply and ventilation to the engine room maneuver your vessel into the wind have all of your crew get into the liferaft
There is a fire in the crew's quarters of your vessel. You should . ventilate the quarters as much as possible prepare to abandon ship close all ventilation to the quarters if possible attempt to put the fire out yourself before sounding the alarm
It is necessary to secure the forced ventilation to a compartment where there is a fire to . allow the exhaust fans to remove smoke extinguish the fire by carbon monoxide smothering prevent additional oxygen from reaching the fire protect fire fighting personnel from smoke
Fire in an engine compartment is best extinguished with carbon dioxide gas (CO2) and by . closing the compartment except for the ventilators completely closing the compartment leaving the compartment open to the air increasing the air flow to the compartment by blowers
Actuating the CO2 fixed system causes the shutdown of the fuel supply exhaust ventilation supply and exhaust ventilation mechanical and natural ventilation
You are releasing carbon dioxide gas (CO2) into an engine compartment to extinguish a fire. The CO2 will be most effective if the . compartment is closed and ventilators are opened compartment is left open to the air compartment is closed and airtight air flow to the compartment is increased with blowers
A fire must be ventilated . when using an indirect attack on the fire such as flooding with water to prevent the gases of combustion from surrounding the firefighters to minimize heat buildup in adjacent compartments if compressed gas cylinders are stowed in the compartment on fire
When should a fire be ventilated? When attacking the fire directly When using a steam smothering system When using the fixed CO2 system All of the above
A high-velocity fog stream can be used in fire fighting situations to drive heat and smoke ahead of the fire fighters in a passageway. This technique should only be used when using a 2-1/2 inch hose there is an outlet for the smoke and heat the fire is totally contained by the ship's structure at least two fog streams can be used
Ventilation systems connected to a compartment in which a fire is burning are normally closed to prevent the rapid spread of the fire by convection conduction radiation spontaneous combustion
A fire is discovered in the forepeak of a vessel at sea. The wind is from ahead at 35 knots. You should remain on course and hold speed change course and put the stern to the wind change course to put the wind on either beam and increase speed remain on course but slack the speed
A fire has broken out on the stern of your vessel. You should maneuver your vessel so the wind . blows the fire back toward the vessel comes over the bow comes over the stern comes over either beam
There is a fire aft aboard your vessel. To help fight the fire, you should put the wind off either beam head the bow into the wind and decrease speed put the stern into the wind and increase speed put the stern into the wind and decrease speed
You are underway when a fire breaks out in the forward part of your vessel. If possible, you should . put the vessel's stern into the wind abandon ship to windward call for assistance keep going at half speed
If there's a fire aboard your vessel, you should FIRST . notify the Coast Guard sound the alarm have passengers put on life preservers cut off air supply to the fire
You are on watch at night in port and discover a fire in #1 hatch. Which action should you take FIRST? Advise the Chief Mate and Master. Release carbon dioxide into the hatch. Sound the general alarm. Lead a fire hose to the hatch.
You are on watch at sea, at night, when the ordinary seaman reports a fire in number five upper 'tween deck. Which of the following should NOT be done immediately? Sound the general alarm Secure mechanical cargo hold ventilation Call for water on deck Release carbon dioxide into the affected compartment
What should be your FIRST action if you discover a fire aboard ship? Sound the alarm. Attempt to put out the fire. Confine it by closing doors, ports, vents, etc. Call the Master.
A fire starts on your vessel while refueling. You should FIRST stop the ventilation sound the general alarm determine the source of the fire attempt to extinguish the fire
Control of fire should be addressed immediately after restoring vital services immediately following control of flooding following establishment of fire boundaries
When approaching a fire from windward, you should shield firefighters from the fire by using low-velocity fog high-velocity fog a straight stream of water foam spray
When approaching a fire from leeward you should shield fire fighters from the fire by using . a straight stream of water foam spray high-velocity fog low-velocity fog
When fighting fires in spaces containing bottles of LPG (liquefied petroleum gas), you should attempt to isolate the fire from the LPG cool the bottles or remove them from the fire area see that the valves on all LPG bottles are closed place insulating material over the bottles
When fighting a fire in a space containing an IMO class 1 hazardous cargo, the most effective fire fighting procedure is to . shut down the ventilation and exclude all air to smother the fire use water from fire hoses or a sprinkler system activate the fixed CO2 firefighting system use high-expansion foam
A fire of escaping liquefied flammable gas is best extinguished by cooling the gas below the ignition point cutting off the supply of oxygen stopping the flow of gas interrupting the chain reaction
When water is used to fight a fire on board a ship, the effect of the weight of the water must be taken into account. How much sea water will increase the weight displacement by one ton? 64 cubic feet 35 cubic feet 100 gallons 500 liters
If you are fighting a fire below the main deck of your vessel, which action is most important concerning the stability of the vessel? Shutting off electricity to damaged cables Pumping firefighting water overboard Maneuvering the vessel so the fire is on the lee side Removing burned debris from the cargo hold
When attempting to enter a compartment containing a fire, which method of applying water is best? High-velocity fog stream directed toward the overhead Straight stream directed into the center of the fire Sweeping the compartment with a fog stream Solid stream directed toward the overhead
In the event of fire in a machinery space, . the fixed carbon dioxide system should be used only when all other means of extinguishment have failed the fixed carbon dioxide system should be used immediately, as it is the most efficient means of extinguishment water in any form should not be used as it will spread the fire the space should be opened 5 minutes after flooding CO2 to prevent injury to personnel
When fighting a fire in an enclosed space, the hose team should crouch as low as possible to . maneuver with the hose more easily obtain the best available air for breathing allow the heat and steam to pass overhead None of the above
Oil fires are best extinguished by cutting off the supply of oxygen removing the fuel cooling below the ignition temperature spraying with water
When two fire hose teams are attacking a fire they should use different fire hose pressures use fire hoses of different sizes not attack the fire from opposite sides not wear protective clothing
According the Lifesaving regulations in Subchapter W, fire and abandon ship drills must be held within 24 hours of leaving port if the percentage of the crew that has not participated in drills aboard that particular vessel in the prior month exceeds . 5% 10% 25% 40%
You notice smoke coming from an open laundry room doorway. After activating the fire alarm, which of the following would you do FIRST? Attempt to determine what is burning. Acquire the nearest self contained breathing apparatus. Break out the nearest fire hose. Wait for the fire team to arrive and assist as directed.
You detect an odor of burning electrical insulation and then notice smoke coming from an open laundry room doorway. After activating the fire alarm, which of the following is the LEAST likely of your next actions? Close the door to the room. Locate the nearest CO2 or dry chemical extinguisher. Secure power to the washers and dryers. Break out the nearest fire hose.
You detect an odor of burning cotton fabric and then see smoke coming from the top of an open laundry room doorway. After activating the fire alarm, you might do any of the following next, EXCEPT . begin breaking out the nearest fire hose secure ventilation to the room close the door to the room acquire the nearest self contained breathing apparatus
Lifesaving regulations in Subchapter W require that a fire drill include starting the fire pumps checking the operation of watertight doors checking arrangements for abandon ship All of the above
What shall be conducted during a fire and boat drill? All watertight doors in the vicinity of the drill shall be operated. All lifeboat equipment shall be examined. Fire pumps shall be started and all exterior outlets opened. All of the above
A deck-stowed 40-foot container is giving off smoke, and one end is discolored from heat. The cargo is valuable and easily damaged by water. You want to extinguish the fire without further damage if possible. What action should you take? Connect a portable line from the ship's fixed system and discharge CO2 into the container. Flood the container with water and disregard any cargo damage as the fire threatens the entire vessel. Pierce the container and discharge 6 or more portable CO2's then add more CO2 hourly. Cool the exterior of the container with water and close all vents; then keep it cooled until it can be off-loaded.
Which firefighting method is an example of an indirect attack on a fire? Bouncing a straight stream of water off the overhead to create spray effect Spraying foam on a bulkhead and letting it flow down and over a pool of burning oil Flooding a paint locker with CO2 and sealing the compartment Cooling adjacent bulkheads with water to prevent the spread of the fire by conduction
The success of an indirect attack on a fire depends on the . size of the fire when initially observed complete containment of the fire cooling ability of the firefighting agent class of the fire
While at your lifeboat station, you hear a signal consisting of two short blasts of the whistle. This signal indicates "abandon ship" "commence lowering boats" "stop lowering boats" "secure from boat stations"
While at your lifeboat station, you hear a signal consisting of one short blast of the whistle. This signal indicates abandon ship commence lowering boats stop lowering boats secure from boat stations
When supplemented by a comparable signal on the general alarm, what is the signal for boat stations or boat drill? More than six short blasts followed by one long blast of the whistle A continuous blast of the whistle for a period of not less than 10 seconds One long blast followed by three short blasts of the whistle Three short blasts of the whistle
The vessel’s fire control plan is laid out on which of the following type of plan? General arrangement Midship section Subdivision Lines
Which type of plan is used to outline the vessel’s fire fighting arrangement within the fire control plan? Partial Inboard profile Subdivision and stability General arrangement
Besides general arrangement plans, what other mediums may be utilized to provide fire control details to officers during fire and emergencies? Microfilm Blueprint Booklet Form None of the above
Which organization reviews and approves a vessel’s fire control plan? U.S. Coast Guard Maritime Administration Vessel's classification society International Maritime Organization
The symbols for fire control plans are approved by which organization? National Fire Protection Agency U.S. Coast Guard International Association of Classification Societies International Maritime Organization
Which of the following is NOT identified on the vessel’s fire control plan? Gas detector Fire control plan Fire and emergency signals Dry chemical monitor
Which of the following is NOT identified on the vessel’s fire control plan? Fire main system Muster lists Secondary means of escape Bilge pumps
Which of the following is NOT required to be part of a vessel’s Fire Control Plan? Ventilation fan location Ventilation fan capacity Ventilation fan control Ventilation dampers
On the vessel’s Fire Control Plan, all parts of the fire main are listed EXCEPT? Fire pump(s) location Fire pump capacity Diameter of fire main Fire station locations
The Fire Control Plan must contain detailed information on which of the following systems? Fixed fire suppression Ship construction Ventilation All of the above
On the vessel’s Fire Control Plan, all parts of a fixed fire suppression system are listed EXCEPT? Spaces protected by the system Extinguishing agent cylinder location Remote cylinder release(s) Instructions for activation of system
Which of the following is not required to be included on Fire Control Plans? Smoke detectors Communication plan Secondary means of escape All watertight doors
On a MODU, where MUST the fire control plan be posted? Crew lounge Mess Area Control Center None of the above
On a MODU, where Must the fire control plan be posted? Pilot house Mess Area Crew Lounge None of the above
Which passenger vessel is required to permanently exhibit a fire control plan? any vessel over 500 Gross Tons a vessel 500 Gross Tons on an international voyage a vessel 500 Gross Tons on a domestic voyage None of the above
What is the purpose of a fire control plan aboard passenger ships? guidance for the officer-in-charge in the event of fire facilitate shore-side fire fighters in fighting fire aboard the vessel show passengers where to evacuate in event of fire All of the above
In what location MUST a duplicate fire control plan be located? Gangway Engine Room Crew Mess Chief Mate's Office
In what location would a duplicate fire control plan normally NOT be located? Navigation Bridge Engine Room Control Master's Office Crew and Passenger Areas
A vessel’s fire control plan shall be posted in every space crewmembers eat and socialize. be written in Spanish and English. have a duplicate set of plans permanently stored outside the deck house. provide a snapshot of the area of every crew member’s stateroom in their stateroom.
A vessel’s fire control plan shall be posted every 150 feet along the most continuous deck on the vessel. permanently posted for the guidance of ship’s officers. given to each crewmember in booklet form. translated into three languages: English, French and Spanish.
In addition to the official language of the flag state, the Fire Control Plan must also be translated into English or French Spanish German Japanese
In this view of the bridge deck on the fire control plan, what is represented by the symbol on the aft bulkhead, port side of the wheelhouse? Fire Alarm Panel Water Tight Door(s) Switch Emergency Lighting Board Copy of Fire Control Plan
Viewing the bridge level of your vessel’s fire control plan, what do the two symbols within the machinery casing represent? CO2 and Halon bell alarms CO2 and Halon remote pull stations CO2 and Halon bottle room CO2 and Halon protected spaces
When the remote push button located in the wheelhouse, starboard side, frame 122, is actuated, what is the result? Engine room water tight doors are secured Ventilation ducts are secured CO2 or Halon extinguishing systems will be energized The general alarm will sound the fire and emergency signal
The Master has ordered you to pull the remote ventilation shut down which is found in what location? Port side fan room, frame 138 Port side of the wheelhouse, frame 122 Starboard side exterior, frame 132 Starboard side of the wheelhouse, frame 122
Your vessel has suffered a casualty and is in danger of sinking. The Master orders abandon ship but a crew member is missing. You have located the crew member but she is trapped in the Steward's Office. Where is the nearest fire axe to gain entry? Starboard side, frame 132 Halon Room Portside, Frame 132 CO2 Room
The solid arrow in the Crew Mess represents . path of forced ventilation search and rescue route nearest door primary means of escape
What emergency equipment is NOT found in the Crew Mess in this view of the vessel’s fire control plan? Primary Means of Escape Fire Alarm Heat Sensor Smoke Detector
Which statement is NOT true about the starboard passageway between frames 122-139? There is a water tight door A push button for halon release is not in the passageway A water fog applicator is available A primary means of escape is not shown
In this view of the vessel’s fire control plan, what emergency equipment is located in the scullery? Heat Detector Gaylord system release valve Fixed water extinguishing system Fire alarm pull box
You are part of a team to overhaul a fire that was just extinguished in the crew lounge. Where is the nearest fire axe to break apart the furniture? Midships, frame 123 Starboard side, frame 123 Port side, frame 132 Starboard side, frame 132
You are on the second deck in the main machinery space. What emergency equipment, if any, is located at frame 107? CO2 fire extinguisher and 1 1/2" fire hose Fire main valve and 1 1/2" fire hose Smoke detector and bell alarm None of the above
You are on the second deck of the engine room between frames 92 thru105 and the space is filling up with smoke. The primary means of escape from that area is via a ladderwell which is located at portside ladderwell, frame 106 portside ladderwell, frame 93 starboard side ladderwell, frame 119 Either A or B
There is an out of control fire on the Auxiliary Machinery Flat. What fixed extinguishing system in that space would be the best means to extinguish the fire? H2O CO2 Halon Drenching
You are part of a search team and have been told that the wiper was last sighted next to the fire pump (s) in the lower engine room. What is the exact location of the fire pump(s)? Machinery space, port side, frame 131 Machinery space, port side, frame 127 Auxiliary machinery space, starboard side, frame 104 Machinery space, starboard side, frame 123
You are being directed to a fire in the lower engine room, portside, frame 127. What machinery is found in that exact location? Emergency fire pumps Generator Bilge pump(s) Lube Oil Purifier
In this view of the fire control plan of the lower engine room, what does the arrow between frames 135 and 140 represent? Direction of fire main Secondary means of escape Missing person search pattern Primary means of escape
From this view of the vessel’s fire control plan, how many spaces are protected by a fixed CO2 extinguishing system? 4 3 2 1
Which fire control plan symbol represents the agent or device best suited for extinguishing a class "A" fire? 56 47 36 26
Which fire control plan symbol(s) represents the agent or device best suited for extinguishing a class "B" fire? 16 and 47 16 and 36 47 26
Which fire control plan symbol represents the agent or device best suited for extinguishing a class "C" fire? 47 56 26 36
The fire control plan symbol that designates a space or compartment protected by Halon 1301 is 10 11 12 44
On fire control plans, the halon room with the main battery of Halon 1301 bottles is designated by which symbol? 44 43 11 10
The fire control plan symbol represented by number (7) is a space protected by CO2 CO2 horn CO2 alarm release station for CO2
The fire control plan symbol represented by (16) is a . foam station foam monitor (gun) foam nozzle space protected by foam
The fire control plan symbol represented by (56) is a . water monitor (gun) water fog applicator space protected by water sprinkler head
This fire control plan symbol represented by (39) is a space protected by . water foam sprinkler none of the above
On a vessel’s fire control plan, the symbol( 64) refers to a . infrared gas detector dry chemical installation inertial gauge inert gas installation
On a vessel’s fire control plan, the symbol (30) refers to a . foam station fuel shutoff fire station none of the above
You must evacuate crewmembers from a space filling with smoke. The primary means of escape is blocked by the fire. What fire control plan symbol designates the secondary means of escape? 61 62 63 19
What two fire control plan symbols designates the directional means of escape? 61 and 62 62 and 63 61and 19 63 and 69
You must evacuate crewmembers from a space filling with smoke. What fire control plan symbol designates the primary means of escape? 61 62 63 69
On fire control plans, the CO2 bottle room is designated by which symbol? 42 9 8 7
On fire control plans, the dry chemical releasing station is designated by which symbol? 42 47 48 50
On international voyages, tank ships of 500 gross tons or more, are required to have facilities to enable a connection on each side of the ship for this fire control equipment 54 53 51 19
Symbol (51) in this diagram is found all through out the ship. What fire control equipment does symbol (51) represent? Fire main with fire valves Foam valves Bilge pump valves Sprinkler valves
Which fire control plan symbol will NOT be found in your stateroom? 30 39 59 60
The location of a spare set of fire control plans on board the vessel is designated by what approved symbol? 1 30 37 69
A complete recharge for a self-contained breathing apparatus can be found in what location designated by this symbol on the ship’s fire control plan? 58 59 60 30
A locker with additional breathing apparatuses can be found in what location designated by this symbol on the ship’s fire control plan? 30 58 59 60
A locker with additional protective clothing can be found in what location designated by this symbol on the ship’s fire control plan? 30 58 59 60
A complete set of spare batteries for a fireman’s outfit can be found in what location designated by this symbol on the ship’s fire control plan? 30 58 59 68
The approved symbol (67) for fire control plans designates a emergency switchboard emergency generator gas detector inert gas installation
Fire control symbol (37) for fire control plans designates a . a fire alarm panel diving operations a fire station high expansion foam supply trunk
On the vessel’s fire control plan, which symbol helps to control the spread of fire ? 68 34 33 32
On the vessel’s fire control plan, which symbol represents a fire damper? 32 33 34 53
Which fire control plan symbol represents a dry chemical delivery method for small scale fires? 16 47 26 48
Which Fire Control Plan symbol represents an international shore connection? 54 53 51 49
Which Fire Control Plan symbol represents a push button for a fire alarm? 2 5 6 24
Which piece(s) of equipment represented by these Fire Control Plan symbols can be found on the exterior of the vessel? 1 53 55 All of the above
Which Fire Control Plan symbol represents a fire alarm panel? 68 58 37 30
Which Fire Control Plan symbol is NOT part of a fixed sprinkler system? 37 38 39 40
Which Fire Control Plan symbol represents a space protected by foam? 17 16 15 13
Which Fire Control Plan symbol represents a fire pump? 19 21 22 54
Which Fire Control Plan symbol represents a heat detector? 18 31 49 63
Which Fire Control Plan symbol represents an emergency fire pump? 19 21 22 54
Which Fire Control Plan symbol represents a fire station? 1 30 51 58
Which Fire Control Plan symbol represents the direction of primary means of escape? 58 61 62 63
Which Fire Control Plan symbol represents an emergency generator? 20 32 67 68
Which Fire Control Plan symbol does NOT contain personal protective equipment? 60 59 58 30
Which Fire Control Plan symbol represents a bilge pump? 54 22 21 19
Which Fire Control Plan symbol represents the best means to extinguish a Class Alpha fire? 23 16 12 7
Which Fire Control Plan symbol represents the best means to extinguish a LARGE Class Bravo fire? 44 39 36 14
Which Fire Control Plan symbol represents a fire main with fire valves? 17 34 51 56
Which Fire Control Plan symbol represents equipment NOT to be found immediately outside the engine room? 12 24 43 57
Which Fire Control Plan symbol represents equipment that is MOST likely to be found in the ship's galley? 31 49 55 68
Which Fire Control Plan symbol represents a NON-portable extinguisher? 57 36 25 14
Which Fire Control Plan symbol is not part of the ship's foam system? 65 50 16 3
Which Fire Control Plan symbol(s) represent part of the vessel's ventilation system? 69 34 18 All of the above
Which Fire Control Plan symbol signifies equipment you would use if your fire pump(s) failed? 22 21 19 54
What is the function of the bypass valve on the self-contained breathing apparatus? The valve opens in excessive heat to release the oxygen in the bottle and prevent the bottle from exploding. In the event of a malfunction in the equipment, the valve can be operated manually to give the wearer air. When pressure in the apparatus exceeds 7 psi above atmospheric pressure, the valve opens to release pressure. The valve reduces the high pressure in the bottle to about 3 psi above atmospheric pressure.
The function of the bypass valve on the self-contained breathing apparatus is to . control the pressure of the oxygen as it enters the body allow the wearer to manually give himself oxygen release excess heat which would otherwise cause the bottle to explode allow exhaled gases to pass outside the bottle
You are in a tank wearing the self-contained breathing apparatus and you desire to return topside. How many tugs of the lifeline mean to take up the slack? One Two Three Four
A self-contained breathing apparatus is used to . make underwater repairs to barges determine if the air in a tank is safe for men enter areas that may contain dangerous fumes or lack oxygen resuscitate an unconscious person
To safely enter a compartment where CO2 has been released from a fixed extinguishing system, you should wear a canister type gas mask test the air with an Orsat apparatus test the air with a pure air indicator wear a self-contained breathing apparatus
After putting on a self-contained breathing apparatus, you open the air supply and hear a continuous ringing of a bell. What does this mean? The unit is working properly. The face mask is not sealed properly. The air bottle needs to be refilled. The air supply hose has a leak.
When the bypass valve of a self-contained breathing apparatus is opened, the mainline valve should be completely open completely closed pinched to check the air flow immediately disconnected
When the bypass valve of a self-contained breathing device is opened, the air flows . directly to the facepiece directly to the air supply bottle through the regulator from the bottle into the atmosphere
When the mainline valve of a self-contained breathing apparatus is open, the bypass valve should be completely open completely closed disconnected partially opened
The bypass valve on a self-contained breathing device should be opened if you are entering a space containing poisonous vapors you are entering a space containing explosive gases the regulator of the breathing apparatus malfunctions the facepiece of the breathing device is too tight
The rated operating time of a self-contained breathing device may be reduced in actual use because of pressure differences in the atmosphere the length of the hose attached to the facepiece the physical exertion of the person wearing the device spaces containing poisonous vapors
The self-contained breathing device should not be used in which situation? Oxygen deficient spaces Compartments containing poisonous vapors Fighting fires that produce heavy smoke Underwater search
When the alarm bell sounds on a positive-pressure, self-contained breathing apparatus, how long will reserve air supply last? About 4-5 minutes About 8-10 minutes About 12-15 minutes About 18-20 minutes
Where on your vessel shall the recharge for each self-contained breathing apparatus be carried? Emergency gear locker Bridge or pilothouse area Where they can be readily found The same location as the equipment it reactivates
You are tending the lifeline of a person who has entered a compartment wearing a breathing apparatus. How many tugs of the lifeline mean "Are you all right"? One Two Three Four
You are wearing a breathing apparatus inside a tank. How many tugs on the lifeline should you give to indicate that you are advancing? 1 2 3 4
You are wearing a breathing apparatus inside a tank. How many tugs on the lifeline indicate that you are all right? 1 2 3 4
You are tending the lifeline of a man who entered a tank using a breathing apparatus. How many tugs on the lifeline indicate that the man should come out immediately? 1 2 3 4
You are tending the lifeline of a man who entered a compartment using a breathing apparatus. How many tugs on the lifeline indicate the man should back out? 1 2 3 4
You are tending the lifeline of a man who entered a compartment using a breathing apparatus. How many tugs on the lifeline indicate the man should advance? 1 2 3 4
You are wearing a breathing apparatus inside a tank. How many tugs on the lifeline should you give to indicate that you need help? 1 2 3 4
You are in a tank wearing a breathing apparatus and you desire to return topside. How many tugs of the lifeline mean "Take up slack"? 1 2 3 4
How does an inert gas system on a tanker function to prevent explosions in cargo tanks? De-energizes the "charged mist" effect. Maintains a positive pressure on the vent header to cool the flammable vapors. Inert gas filters out the flammable vapors from the cargo tank spaces. Inert gas dilutes the flammable vapor and air concentrations to keep them below the lower explosive limit.
An inert gas system on a tanker should be used to . prevent the generation of flammable or combustible gas in tanks blow out cargo lines to prevent the build up of gas concentrations dilute tank atmospheres to keep gas concentrations below the lower explosive limit prevent fires in the pumproom by continually displacing flammable vapors
An inert gas system is designed to reduce the possibility of tank explosions by . eliminating sparks and fire in the vicinity of cargo tanks removing all hydrocarbon gases from the cargo tanks blanketing cargo tanks with inert foam reducing the oxygen concentration below levels necessary for combustion
The purpose of inert gas systems aboard tank vessels is to allow sufficient oxygen in the tank to sustain life prevent outside air from entering the tank provide increase in cargo discharge pressure comply with double hull pollution prevention regulations
An inert gas system installed on a tanker is designed to . aid in the stripping and cleaning of cargo tanks increase the rate of discharge of cargo force toxic and explosive fumes from a cargo tank to vent to the outside atmosphere lower the oxygen levels inside cargo tanks, making explosion nearly impossible
Every U.S. crude oil tankship with a keel laying date on or after 1/1/75, shall be equipped with an inert gas system if the tonnage is more than 100,000 DWT (long tons) 100,000 DWT (metric tons) 50,000 DWT (long tons) 50,000 DWT (metric tons)
The fresh air intake of the inert gas system , prevents the flue gas from falling below an oxygen content of 3% allows the inert gas piping to be used for gas freeing the tanks opens when there is excessive vacuum on the deck water seal enables outside air to mix with and to cool the hot flue gasses
Which part of the inert gas system is designed to relieve sudden large overpressures that exceed the capacity of the mechanical P/V valves? Pressure control valve Deck water seal Liquid filled P/V breaker Isolation valve
After the initial cleaning of flue gas in an inert gas system the gas is passed through what device for final cleaning? Scrubber Demister Deck water seal Final filter
Which function is NOT provided by the scrubber of an inert gas system? Cools the inert gas. Removes particulate matter like soot. Maintains gas pressure in the tanks. Removes chemical impurities from the gas.
What is the major function of the deck water seal in an inert gas system? Relieves excessive pressures from the system. Isolates hazardous areas from nonhazardous areas. Prevents the flow of inert gas into closed or isolated tanks. Removes any leftover water or soot after the gas has been scrubbed.
The deck water seal of the inert gas system . cools the inert gas and prevents soot from entering the cargo tanks acts as an emergency system shutdown when the inlet pressures exceed the safe working pressure in the hazardous zone prevents the backflow of hydrocarbon gasses into nonhazardous areas relieves sudden large overpressures in the system
Which alarm is NOT found on an inert gas system? Low oxygen alarm Low pressure alarm Scrubber high water level alarm Deck seal low water alarm
You are crude oil washing on a tanker with an inert gas system. What percentage of oxygen must the inert gas system produce and deliver to the tanks? 0% 5% 8% 11%
What is the maximum percent of oxygen, by volume, allowed to be maintained in the cargo tanks prior to the commencement of crude oil tank washing? 5% 8% 10% 12%
By regulation, cargo tank atmosphere must be inert before and during which operation? Stripping Loading Cleaning All of the above
By regulation, cargo tank atmosphere must be inert before and during which operation? Stripping Loading crude oil washing All of the above
By regulation, cargo tank atmosphere must be inert before and during which operation? crude oil washing Loading discharging All of the above
By regulation, cargo tank atmosphere must be inert before and during which operation? crude oil washing topping off stripping All of the above
By regulation, cargo tank atmosphere must be inert before and during which operation? stripping topping off gravitating All of the above
The component in an inert gas system used for cleaning the gas of solid and sulfur combustion products, while simultaneously cooling the inert gas, is called the . filter cooler scrubber purifier
Which of the listed functions is the purpose of a gas scrubber in an inert gas generation system? Cools the inert gas. Maintains the oxygen content at 5% by volume. Bleeds off static electricity in the inert gas. Maintains flow to the water seal on the gas main.
During loading and discharging operations, in addition to when the cargo tanks have been properly filled, each inert gas system must be capable of maintaining a minimum gas pressure of . 150 millimeters of water pressure 125 millimeters of water pressure 100 millimeters of water pressure 75 millimeters of water pressure
After allowing for pressure losses, the pressure-volume capacity of an inert gas blower must be able to maintain a pressure, in any cargo tank, at a minimum of . 50 millimeters of water pressure 100 millimeters of water pressure 150 millimeters of water pressure 200 millimeters of water pressure
On a hydrocarbon flammability chart the line which extends from 0% to 21.8% oxygen, lying tangent to the flammability range, is called the minimum oxygen content line critical displacement line critical dilution line upper threshold limit
The combined fan discharge rate in an inert gas system is related to the shoreside loading rate cargo pump discharge rate boiler forced draft fan rate size of the largest cargo tank
In order for combustion to occur inside a piping system such as a vapor collection header in a marine emission control system, there must be fuel oxygen ignition All of the above
Tank vessel inerting refers to the introduction of inert gas into a tank with the object of reducing the oxygen content to below 8% by volume the introduction of inert gas into a gas free tank for the purpose of reducing the oxygen content to below 8% by volume the introduction of inert gas into a cargo tank during cargo discharge to replace the volume of discharged cargo All of the above
The maximum allowable oxygen content within the ship's cargo tanks, inert gas piping and the vapor recovery system is . 4% 5% 8% 10%
The high-level overfill tank alarm, installed in the on-board monitoring system, must . operate in unison with other alarms be both audible and visual be the same as the overfill alarm sound when the tank is 90% full
Introducing inert gas into a tank already inert with the object of further reducing the oxygen or hydrocarbon content to prevent combustion if air enters the tank is called . purging gas freeing gas dispersion bonding
Each hose used for transferring vapors must . have a design burst pressure of at least 25 psig be capable of withstanding at least 2.0 psi vacuum without collapsing or constricting be electrically continuous with a maximum resistance of ten thousand ohms All of the above
In an inert gas system, high pressure alarms are set in the main vapor collection line to cause an audible and visual alarm if the pressure reaches a certain level. What is the percentage of the lowest relief valve setting at which the alarm must sound? 70% 80% 90% 95%
A large metallic device, mounted directly in the piping (usually located at the dock near the point where the vapor hose is attached), designed to prevent the passage of a rapidly moving flame through the piping is called a . flame arrestor flame screen detonation arrestor detonation blocker
The advantages of using an inert gas system on a tank vessel is that it provides . for faster loading tank atmosphere with low oxygen content better fuel economy All of the above
Which statement is TRUE concerning inert gas systems on tank vessels? Flue gases from the ship's boilers are used in some systems. Helium is the preferred inert gas. Using the system accelerates the rusting of the tanks. All of the above
Which statement about the inert gas system is TRUE? Boiler soot blowers should never be used when the IG system is operating. The boiler will produce the best quality of flue gas for the IG system when the boiler load is very light. The boiler will produce the most quantity of flue gas for the IG system when the boiler load is very light. Flue gas with excessive oxygen content is de-oxygenated in the scrubber.
You are discharging cargo and the inert gas system is in operation to inert the tanks. The pressure in a tank being discharged starts to drop below the allowable limit. What action should you take? Cut in another IG fan to increase gas flow. Open the pressure control valve until the pressure increases. Open the tank isolation valve to the fully open position. Reduce the pumping rate.
Which operation may cause the pressure in an inert tank to fall below the prescribed limits? Loading Discharging Crude oil washing Steaming tanks
The liquid-filled PV breaker has acted to relieve a vacuum in a tank. What action must be taken in regards to the PV-breaker before continuing operations? Check to make certain that it has reset itself. Refill the breaker with liquid. Manually reset the vacuum side of the breaker. Install a new rupture disc.
What type of liquid is used in the liquid P/V breaker? Hydraulic oil Water-antifreeze mixture Distilled water Oil from the cargo
Which statement about inert gas pressures in a cargo tank is TRUE? The pressures of the inert gas in the tank may create excessive pressure at the pump while discharging. Gas pressures should be maintained at the highest permissible level throughout the discharging process. High gas pressures may cause pyrophoric oxidation in the tank. High gas pressures may cause loss of suction when stripping.
Which method is used to supply inert gas from a flue gas system to the cargo tanks? Exhaust gas pressure from the stack High capacity fan Inert gas compressor Natural aspiration
Which action must be taken when an individual cargo tank is closed off from the inert gas system by the tank isolation valve? The tank must be gas freed. The tank must be ballasted. The tank must be vented to the atmosphere. The bypass valve must also be closed.
Which statement about the pressure in a tank being inerted by an inert gas system is TRUE? The maximum pressure permitted is 8 psi. A positive pressure should be maintained at all times. The pressure must remain within the limits of +5 psi to -1 psi. None of the above
Which of the following represents the maximum percent of oxygen, by volume, required to be achieved by a ship's inert gas system, prior to the commencement of crude oil tank washing? 6% 8% 10% 12%
Where are remote readouts for oxygen concentration, pressure, and temperature of an inert gas system required to be located? Bridge and engine control consoles Bridge and tank(s) being inerted Main deck and engine control consoles Cargo control and engine control consoles
Each ship having an inert gas system must have a portable instrument to measure concentrations of hydrocarbon vapor in inert atmospheres and also to measure nitrogen oxygen carbon dioxide water vapor
The purpose of the deck seal in an inert gas system is to prevent flammable vapors from entering machinery space flue gas escaping to atmosphere inert gas escaping to atmosphere air entering inert gas system
Each inert gas system must be designed to supply the cargo tanks with a gas, or mixture of gasses, that has an oxygen content by volume of 5% or less 10% or less 15% or less 20% or less
Coast Guard Regulations permit which of the following systems to be used for fire prevention and the simultaneous inerting of cargo tanks on tank vessels? An inert gas system The deck foam system The fire main system A fixed water spray system
The blowers of an inert gas generation system aboard a tanker, will be automatically secured if normal water supply at the water seal is lost the temperature of the inert gas being delivered to the cargo tanks is more than 150°F the cooling water supply to the scrubbers is lost all of the above
The last 1.0 meter (3.3 feet) of vapor piping before the vessel vapor connection must be painted red/yellow/red yellow/red/yellow international orange hi-visibility yellow
Each inert gas system gas main must have an automatic shut down valve at the outlet of the gas production plant. This valve must close automatically upon . cargo pump failure blower failure deck seal low water level low inert gas temperature
On a vapor control system, each vessel's vapor connection flange must have a . 6" reducer stud at least 1" long projecting from the flange face pressure gauge permanently attached to the flange hose saddle
During loading, what is the minimum pressure required to be maintained by the inert gas system on cargo tanks? 2" water gauge 4" water gauge 20" water gauge 40" water gauge
You are on an inerted tankship. A low pressure alarm must be set to cause an audible and visual alarm if the pressure in the tanks cannot be maintained at more than . 4" water gauge 90% of the vacuum relief setting 90% of the pressure drop through the scrubber 90% of the vacuum assist fan
When checking the oxygen content of the cargo tanks prior to loading cargoes requiring vapor recovery, the atmosphere must be sampled one meter from the tank bottom and one meter below the tank top one half the ullage of the tank and one meter below the tank top one half the ullage of the tank and one meter above the tank bottom at three meter intervals from the tank top
An on-board monitoring system, using level sensors permanently installed in each vessel compartment, will have a high level alarm set at not more than 90% of compartment capacity 95% of compartment capacity 97% of compartment capacity 99% of compartment capacity
On a tank vessel, each high level alarm and tank overfill alarm must be tested . no earlier than 24 hours prior to loading no later than 24 hours prior to loading anytime prior to loading weekly
Vapor recovery hoses must be tested yearly at what ratio to their maximum allowable working pressure? 1% mawp 2 mawp 3 mawp 5 mawp
Spreading oil on the open sea has the effect of . diminishing the height of the seas lengthening the distance between successive crests increasing the height of the seas preventing the wave crests from breaking
Which statement is TRUE concerning life jackets which are severely damaged? They should be replaced. They must be tested for buoyancy before being continued in use. They can be repaired by a reliable seamstress. They can be used for children.
Which statement is TRUE concerning life jackets which are severely damaged? They should be replaced. They must be tested for buoyancy before being continued in use. They can be repaired by a reliable seamstress. They can be used for children.
Life jackets should be marked with the maximum weight allowed stowage space assigned vessel's home port vessel's name
Kapok life jackets should NOT be stowed near open flame or where smoking is permitted used as seats, pillows, or foot rests left on open decks All of the above
Which statement is TRUE concerning life preservers (Type I personal flotation devices)? Buoyant vests may be substituted for life jackets. Life preservers are designed to turn an unconscious person's face clear of the water. Life preservers must always be worn with the same side facing outwards to float properly. Lightly stained or faded life jackets will fail in the water and should not be used.
Life jackets should be stowed in survival craft messrooms readily accessible locations locked watertight containers
You must ensure that lifesaving equipment is . locked up readily accessible for use inaccessible to passengers on the topmost deck of the vessel at all times
Life jackets should be stowed in survival craft messrooms readily accessible locations locked watertight containers
Which statement is TRUE concerning life preservers? Buoyant vests may be substituted for life preservers. Kapok life preservers must have vinyl-covered pad inserts. Life preservers must always be worn with the same side facing outwards. Life preservers are not designed to turn a person's face clear of the water when unconscious.
On an OSV, when may a work vest be substituted for a required life jacket? To replace a damaged life jacket For use during fire drills For use during boat drills At no time
Each buoyant work vest on an OSV must be . Coast Guard Approved marked with the name of the unit equipped with a waterlight All of the above
Which statement is TRUE concerning life jackets? Buoyant vests may be substituted for life jackets. Life jackets are designed to turn an unconscious person's face clear of the water. Life jackets must always be worn with the same side facing outwards to float properly. Lightly stained or faded life jackets will fail in the water and should not be used.
An emergency sea anchor may be constructed by using . a boat bucket an air tank filled with water an oar and canvas weighted down All of the above
When a sea anchor is used in landing stern first in a heavy surf, sternway is checked by . slacking the tripping line and towing the sea anchor from the stern slacking the tripping line and towing the sea anchor by the holding line towing with the tripping line and leaving the holding line slack towing the apex end forward with the tripping line
You are in a lifeboat in a heavy sea. Your boat is dead in the water and unable to make way. To prevent broaching, you should . take no action, broaching is recommended in a heavy sea put out the sea anchor put out the sea painter fill the bottom of the boat with about one foot of water to make it ride better
Your rescue craft is broken down and rolling in heavy seas. You can reduce the possibility of capsizing by shifting the rudder constantly moving all personnel forward and low moving all personnel aft rigging a sea anchor
The purpose of the tripping line on a sea anchor is to . aid in casting off direct the drift of the vessel aid in its recovery maintain maximum resistance to broaching
A sea anchor is . a heavy anchor with an extra long line used to anchor in deep water a cone shaped bag used to slow down the wind drift effect a pad eye to which the sea painter is made fast made of wood if it is of an approved type
When a sea anchor for a lifeboat is properly rigged, it will . completely stop the lifeboat from drifting help to prevent broaching prevent the lifeboat from pitching None of the above
When a sea anchor for a survival craft is properly rigged, it will . completely stop the survival craft from drifting help to prevent broaching prevent the survival craft from pitching prevent the survival craft from rolling
Due to the shape of the sea anchor, the best way to haul it back aboard is by . hauling in on the anchor line as you would any anchor getting all hands to assist its trip line cutting the line, as you cannot haul it back in
When you stream a sea anchor, you should make sure that the holding line is . long enough to cause the pull to be more horizontal than downward long enough to reach bottom short enough to cause the pull to be downward short enough to avoid tangling
Which is TRUE concerning immersion suits and their use? Only a light layer of clothing may be worn underneath. They provide sufficient flotation to do away with the necessity of wearing a life jacket. They should be tight fitting. A puncture in the suit will not appreciably reduce its value.
Which is TRUE concerning immersion suits and their use? Only a light layer of clothing may be worn underneath. They provide sufficient flotation to do away with the necessity of wearing a life jacket. They should be tight fitting. A puncture in the suit will not appreciably reduce its value.
Which statement about immersion suits is TRUE? Immersion suits should be worn during routine work on deck to provide maximum protection. After purchasing, the suit should be removed from its storage bag and hung on a hanger where readily accessible. Immersion suits must have a PFD light attached to the front shoulder area. Small leaks or tears may be repaired using the repair kit packed with the suit.
What statement about immersion suits is TRUE? Immersion suits should be worn while performing routine work on deck. No stowage container for immersion suits may be capable of being locked. During the annual maintenance, the front zipper should be lubricated using light machine oil or mineral oil. Any tear or leak will render the suit unserviceable and it must be replaced.
Which statement concerning immersion suits is TRUE? Immersion suits should be worn while performing routine work on deck. After purchasing, the suit should be stowed in the storage bag in which it was received. During the annual maintenance, the front zipper should be lubricated using light machine oil or mineral oil. Any tear or leak will render the suit unserviceable and it must be replaced.
You are testing the external inflation bladder on an immersion suit and find it has a very slow leak. Which action should be taken? Replace the suit. Replace the inflation bladder. Take it out of service and repair in accordance with the manufacturers instructions. Some leakage should be expected and a topping off tube is provided; no other action is necessary.
Which statement concerning immersion suits is TRUE? Immersion suits should be worn during routine work on deck to provide maximum protection. After purchasing, the suit should be removed from its storage bag and hung on a hanger where readily accessible. Immersion suits must have a PFD light attached to the front shoulder area. Small leaks or tears may be repaired using the repair kit packed with the suit.
How is the external flotation bladder of an immersion suit inflated? It is inflated by a small CO2 bottle that is automatically tripped when the front zipper is at the top of the zipper track. It is inflated by a small CO2 bottle that is manually tripped. It is inflated by blowing through an inflation tube. It inflates by sea water bleeding into the flotation bladder and reacting with a chemical therein.
The external flotation bladder of an immersion suit should be inflated only after two hours in the water only after four hours in the water before entry into the water upon entry into the water
The immersion suit requirements for OSV apply to units operating in the Atlantic Ocean . above 20 degrees North and below 20 degrees South above 25 degrees North and below 25 degrees South above 30 degrees North and below 30 degrees South above 32 degrees North and below 32 degrees South
Which statement about immersion suits is TRUE? The suit's oil resistance is such that it will be serviceable and be usable after exposure to gasoline or mineral spirits without needing to be specially treated. The suit seals in body heat and provides protection against hypothermia indefinitely. The suit is flameproof and provides protection to the wearer while swimming through burning oil. The suit must, without assistance, turn an unconscious person's mouth clear of the water within 5 seconds.
Which statement about immersion suits is TRUE? The suit's oil resistance is such that it will be serviceable and be usable after exposure to gasoline or mineral spirits without needing to be specially treated. The suit seals in body heat and provides protection against hypothermia indefinitely. The suit is flameproof and provides protection to the wearer while swimming through burning oil. The suit must, without assistance, turn an unconscious person's mouth clear of the water within 5 seconds.
Which statement about immersion suits is TRUE? Prior to abandonment, the suit allows body movement such as walking, climbing a ladder and picking up small objects. The immersion suit seals in body heat and provides protection against hypothermia for weeks. The suit is flameproof and provides protection to the wearer while swimming through burning oil. The wearer of the suit is severely restricted and requires twice the time to climb a ladder than without the suit
Which statement about immersion suits is TRUE? The suit must, without assistance, turn an unconscious person's mouth clear of the water within 5 seconds. The immersion suit seals in body heat and provides protection against hypothermia for weeks. The suit will still be serviceable after a brief (2-6 minutes) exposure to flame and burning. The collar must be inflated before abandoning ship.
Which statement about immersion suits is TRUE? Prior to abandonment, the suit allows body movement such as walking, climbing a ladder and picking up small objects. The immersion suit seals in body heat and provides protection against hypothermia for weeks. The suit is flameproof and provides protection to the wearer while swimming through burning oil. The wearer of the suit is severely restricted and requires twice the time to climb a ladder than without the suit.
Which statement about immersion suits is TRUE? Prior to abandonment, the suit allows body movement such as walking, climbing a ladder and picking up small objects. The immersion suit seals in body heat and provides protection against hypoglycemia for weeks. The suit is flameproof and provides protection to the wearer while swimming through burning oil. The wearer of the suit is severely restricted and requires 1.5 times more time to climb a ladder than without the suit.
Which statement about immersion suits is TRUE? The primary color of the suit's exterior may be red, orange or yellow. The suit must, without assistance, turn an unconscious person's mouth clear of the water within 5 seconds. The suit is flameproof and provides protection to a wearer swimming in burning oil. The suit may be stored in a machinery space where the ambient temperature is 160°F.
An immersion suit must be equipped with a(n) . air bottle for breathing orange smoke canister whistle, light and retroreflective material sea dye marker
An immersion suit must be equipped with a/an . air bottle for breathing orange smoke canister whistle, light and retroreflective material sea dye marker
How is the external flotation bladder of an immersion suit inflated? It is inflated by a small CO2 bottle that is automatically tripped when the front zipper is at the top of the zipper track. It is inflated by a small CO2 bottle that is manually tripped. It is inflated by blowing through an inflation tube. It inflates by seawater bleeding into the inflation bladder and reacting with a chemical.
The external inflation bladder on an immersion suit should be inflated before you enter the water after you enter the water after one hour in the water after you notice that your suit is losing buoyancy
You are testing the external flotation bladder of an immersion suit and find it has a very slow leak. Which action should be taken? Replace the suit. Replace the inflation bladder. Contact the manufacturer for repair instructions. Some leakage should be expected and a topping off tube is provided; no other action is necessary.
The external flotation bladder on an immersion suit should be inflated only after two hours in the water only after four hours in the water before entry into the water upon entry into the water
An immersion suit should be equipped with a/an . air bottle for breathing whistle and hand held flare whistle, strobe light and reflective tape whistle, hand held flare and sea dye marker
The lifesaving equipment on all vessels shall be . inspected weekly stowed in locked compartments readily accessible tested yearly
The instructions for rescue boats and liferafts on an OSV must be approved by the . lease operator Minerals Management Service Coast Guard person-in-charge of the unit
Which precaution should be taken when testing a line throwing gun? Never remove the line from the rocket. Fire it at an angle of approximately 90 degrees to the horizon. Wear asbestos gloves. All of the above
If you see an individual fall overboard, you should . throw him/her a life buoy hail "man overboard" pass the word to the bridge All of the above
A person who observes an individual fall overboard from an OSV should immediately jump into the water to assist the individual call for help and keep the individual in sight run to the radio room to send an emergency message go to the control room for the distress flares
Which document will describe lifesaving equipment located aboard your vessel? Muster List ("Station Bill") Certificate of Inspection Forecastle Card Clearance Papers
Where would you find a list of the lifesaving equipment onboard your supply boat? Ship's Articles Muster List ("Station Bill") Certificate of Inspection U.S. Coast Guard Regulations
On board an OSV, the key to the most rapid and effective response to a man overboard situation is . switching to hydraulic steering a dedicated crew good equipment good communication
The light on a personal flotation device on an OSV must be replaced when the power source is replaced each year after installation every six months when it is no longer serviceable
Each personal flotation device light on an OSV that has a non-replacement power source must be replaced every six months after initial installation every 12 months after initial installation every 24 months after initial installation on or before the expiration date of the power source
The capacity of any liferaft on board a vessel can be determined by examining the Certificate of Inspection examining the plate on the outside of the raft container referring to the Muster List ("Station Bill") referring to the shipping articles
Your vessel has 3 lifeboats on each side. The middle boat on the starboard side is designated as boat number . 2 2 STARBOARD 3 4
Your vessel has 3 lifeboats on each side. The aftermost boat on the starboard side is designated as boat number . 6 5 3 3 STARBOARD
Lifesaving equipment shall be stowed so that it will be . locked up readily accessible for use inaccessible to passengers on the topmost deck of the vessel at all times
When can a work vest be substituted for a lifejacket in the total count of the required lifesaving gear? When it is approved by the Coast Guard When working near or over the water When stowed away from the ring buoys A work vest may never be counted as a lifejacket.
Coast Guard Regulations (46 CFR) require that life jackets shall be provided for each person onboard provided for all personnel of watch readily accessible to persons in the engine room All of the above
In accordance with Coast Guard Regulations, Coast Guard approved buoyant work vests . should be stowed in engineering spaces in lieu of approved life jackets because they are less bulky and permit free movement in confined spaces may be used as a substitute for approved life preservers during routine drills, but never during an emergency should not be stowed where they could be confused with life jackets in an emergency All of the above
Lifejackets should be stowed in the forepeaks the pumproom readily accessible spaces locked watertight containers
If passengers are on board when an abandon ship drill is carried out, they should . take part watch go to their quarters stay out of the way and do what they want
You have abandoned ship and after two days in a liferaft you can see an aircraft near the horizon apparently carrying out a search pattern. You should . switch the EPIRB to the homing signal mode use the voice transmission capability of the EPIRB to guide the aircraft to your raft turn on the strobe light on the top of the EPIRB use visual distress signals in conjunction with the EPIRB
How often must the impulse-projected line throwing appliance be test fired? Monthly At the Master's discretion Semiannually Annually
Preventer bars are fitted on lifeboat releasing gear to prevent the falls from unhooking if the releasing gear is operated accidentally operation of the release lever until the boat is waterborne the falls from rehooking after they have been released accidental unhooking when the falls become slack
Preventer bars are fitted on lifeboat releasing hooks to prevent the falls from unhooking if the releasing gear is operated accidentally while the boat is being lowered operation of the release lever until the boat is waterborne the falls from rehooking after they have been released accidental unhooking when the falls become slack
All personnel should be familiar with the lifeboats . boarding and operating procedures maintenance schedule navigational systems fuel consumption rates
Before hydraulic starting of an engine on a covered lifeboat, what need NOT be checked? Fuel supply line valve Pressure registered on the accumulator gauge Cold-spark voltage readings test lamp Engine stop control
Motor-propelled lifeboats are required to be fitted with which of the following? Compartments for the storage of canned drinking water Ballast tanks to prevent the boat from capsizing An air starter on the diesel engine Auxiliary mechanical propulsion (Fleming gear)
The engine in a covered lifeboat is fueled with . leaded gasoline unleaded gasoline diesel oil liquefied gas
Your vessel is equipped with totally enclosed lifeboats. Which statement is TRUE when the boat is enveloped in flames? The ventilators will automatically close by the action of fusible links. The motor takes its air supply from outside the lifeboat to prevent asphyxiation of the crew. A water spray system to cool the outside of the boat is operated by a high-volume manual pump. An air tank will provide about ten minutes of air for the survivors and the engine.
What is NOT a function of the air supply of a covered lifeboat? Provides air for engine combustion Pressurizes water spray system Provides air for passenger respiration Prevents smoke and other noxious fumes from entering craft
With the air supply on, the air pressure in an enclosed lifeboat will be . changing in relation to the speed of the craft less than outside air pressure greater than outside air pressure equal to outside air pressure
When operating the air supply system in a covered lifeboat the . fuel supply valve should be closed hatches, doors, and oar ports should be closed air cylinder shut-off valve should be closed engine should be shut off
Most lifeboats are equipped with unbalanced rudders balanced rudders contraguide rudders straight rudders
The sprinkler system of an enclosed lifeboat is used to . cool the craft in a fire cool the engine spray oil on the sea to calm it spray personnel during a fire
The purpose of a water spray system on a covered lifeboat is to cool the lifeboat engine keep the lifeboat from reaching combustion temperature while operating in a fire keep the lifeboat warm in a cold climate by applying heated water spray from the engine to the boat put out a fire inside the lifeboat
As shown, number 1 operates the releasing gear McCluny hook sea painter Fleming gear
In illustration D011SA, number 1 operates the . releasing gear sea painter Fleming gear McCluny hook
Most enclosed lifeboats will right themselves after capsizing IF the lower ballast tanks are filled with water fuel tanks are not less than half full passengers are strapped to their seats sea anchor is deployed to windward
Why are lifeboats usually double-enders? They are more seaworthy and less likely to be swamped or broach to. They can go forward and backward more easily. They require less space for stowing aboard ship. There is no particular reason for this.
Your vessel has lifeboats on both sides. Lifeboat No. 2 is located forward of lifeboat No. 4 on the starboard side forward of lifeboat No. 4 on the port side aft of lifeboat No. 1 on the starboard side All of the above
Number 3 lifeboat would be the forward boat on the starboard side behind boat number 1 on the port side behind boat number 1 on the starboard side behind boat number 2 on the port side
The number 2 lifeboat on a tanker would be . forwardmost on the port side forwardmost on the starboard side abaft #1 lifeboat port side abaft #1 lifeboat starboard side
The bottom row of plating next to the keel of a lifeboat is known as the sheer strake bilge strake garboard strake keel rib
What is the purpose of limber holes? To allow for air circulation To allow for stress and strain in rough waters To allow water in the boat to drain overboard To allow water in the bilge to get to the boat drain
Aluminum lifeboats are subject to damage by electrolytic corrosion (the aluminum being eaten away). In working around boats of aluminum you must be very careful . to keep the boats covered at all times not to leave steel or iron tools lying in or near these boats to keep an electric charge on the hull at all times to rinse these boats regularly with salt water
In order to prevent galvanic corrosion, an aluminum boat must be insulated from the davits and gripes. Which of the following is acceptable as an insulator? Hard rubber Canvas Leather Sponge rubber
The length of the steering oar in a lifeboat is . shorter than the rowing oars the same length as the rowing oars longer than the rowing oars unrelated to the length of the rowing oars
The steering oar in a lifeboat is shorter than the others used for the stroke oar used by the forward man in the boat to direct the bow longer than the others and should be lashed to the stern
A sweep oar is an oar that is generally shorter than the others and is used to steer with is longer than the others and is used as the stroke oar is raised in the bow of the boat for the steersman to steer by longer than the others used for steering
The steering oar in a lifeboat is usually referred to as the . bumpkin oar stroke oar sweep oar becket oar
What should be used to steer an open lifeboat if the rudder becomes lost or damaged? Sea anchor Steering oar Spare rudder Daggerboard
Stretchers are fitted in lifeboats to provide a . place for people to lie down means for rigging the sail place for rowers to brace their feet suitable means for water to drain below the footings
The grab rail of a metal lifeboat is normally located . along the turn of the bilge along each side of the keel near the top of the gunwale at the bow and at the stern
The purpose of air tanks in a lifeboat is to . make the boat float higher provide a stowage place for provisions add strength to the boat keep the boat afloat if flooded
The tops of the thwarts, side benches, and the footings of a lifeboat are painted which color? International orange Yellow White Red
In painting a lifeboat following its overhaul, which parts must be painted bright red? the top 2-1/2 inches of each side the releasing gear lever the fuel tanks the thwarts
In order for the automatic lifeboat drain to operate properly . the cap should be removed to drain the boat when it is waterborne the cage must be free of rubbish or the ball may not seat properly there is an automatic ball check located in a siphon tube the small lever to release the rubber ball float must be turned counterclockwise
A person referring to the stern sheets of a lifeboat is speaking of the line attached to the tack of the lugsail the emergency rudder a canvas awning the aftermost seating
On a lifeboat equipped with Rottmer-type releasing gear, turning the releasing lever releases . the painter the after boat fall only if the boat is waterborne both falls at the same time only if the boat is waterborne both falls at the same time even if the boat has not reached the water
The maximum speed of lowering for a lifeboat on gravity davits is controlled by the . limit switches emergency disconnect switch governor brake position of the counterweight on the brake handle
What is the purpose of the limit switch on gravity davits? To cut off the power when the davits hit the track safety stops To stop the davits from going too fast To cut off the power when the davits are about 12 inches or more from the track safety stops None of the above
Limit switches are used on which davits? Sheath-screw davits Gravity davits Radial davits Quadrantal davits
After the boat is at the top of the davit heads, the davit arms begin moving up the tracks and are stopped by the hoist man limit switch brake handle preventer bar
Limit switches . control the descent rate of a lifeboat control the ascent rate of a lifeboat cut off power to the winch when the lifeboat nears the final stowed position cut off power to the winch when the lifeboat reaches the davit bumpers
You will find a limit switch on a liferaft cradle radial davit sheath-screw davit gravity davit
Limit switches on gravity davits should be tested by . the engineers, from a panel in the engine room shutting off the current to the winch pushing the switch lever arm while the winch is running All of the above
FraoDina lines . secure the lifeboat in the davits when in the stowed position bring the lifeboat close alongside the rail in the embarkation position give the occupants a safety line when the boat is being lowered from the embarkation level reduce the swinging of the lifeboat at the embarkation level
When operating gravity davits, the gripes should be released after the boat is moving davits should always be hand cranked the last 12 inches into the final stowed position boats are generally lowered by surging the falls around cruciform bitts tricing pendant should be tripped prior to releasing the gripes
What could be a result of insufficient lubrication of lifeboat winches and davits? Moisture accumulation in winch motor damaging the electrical wiring Freezing of gears in cold weather Corroding of sheaves on the davits so they will not rotate All of the above
What is TRUE concerning frapping lines? They are used to steady a lifeboat when lowered. They are normally attached to the davit span. They are needed only on radial davits. They are used to clear the puddings.
The tricing pendants should be released . before the gripes are removed before loading the passengers after loading the passengers after the boat is afloat
The purpose of the tricing pendants is to . control the fore and aft motion of a lifeboat during lowering control the outboard swing of a lifeboat during lowering provide suspensions for the manropes hold a lifeboat next to the embarkation deck while loading
What will be released by pulling on line number 5? Frapping line Gripes Tricing pendant Lifeboat
As shown, the line indicated by number 4 is connected to the releasing gear sea painter McCluny hook Fleming gear
The mechanism that will release the tricing pendant, as shown, is the fore and aft gripes the McCluny hook a quick release lever a 3/4" shackle
On open lifeboats, the purpose of the wire stretched between the davit heads is to . keep the movement of the davits at the same speed keep the davits from slipping when they are in the stowed position prevent vibration during lowering of the boat support the manropes
Lines passed around the falls to hold the boat while passengers are boarding are . life lines frapping lines tricing lines tripping lines
Frapping lines are fitted to lifeboat davits to . reduce the swinging of the lifeboat as it is being lowered from the embarkation level secure the lifeboat in the davits when in the stowed position hold the lifeboat to the ship's side until the tricing lines are passed be used as a safety line in an emergency
The falls on gravity davits are manila nylon wire All of the above
The type of davit on which you must turn a crank in order to swing the lifeboat out over the ship's side is a sheath-screw davit gravity davit radial davit bruckner davit
The most common type of davit found on merchant vessels today is the radial sheath-screw gravity quadrantal
On which type davit does the davit head stay at the same height? Radial Sheath-screw Quadrantal Gravity
The type davits shown are round-bar davits radial davits gravity davits quadrantal davits
Which davit type may be operated by one man? Quadrantal Gravity Sheath-screw Radial
Blocks and falls used as lifeboat gear must be designed with a minimum safety factor of . 4, based on the breaking strength 5, based on the maximum allowable stress 6, based on the maximum working load 8, based on the normal working load
How should the lifeboat sea painter be rigged? Spliced into the ring on the stem post Secured by a toggle around the outboard side of a forward thwart Secured to the inboard side of a forward thwart and led inboard of the falls Secured by a toggle to the stem post and led outboard of the falls
When launching a lifeboat, the tricing pennants should be released before the boat is lowered from the stowed position as the boat-fall blocks break clear of the davit head before the boat is lowered from the embarkation level after the boat is released into the water
In launching a lifeboat, when should the tricing pendants be released? Before the boat is lowered from the stowage position As soon as the boat-fall blocks clear the davit head After the limit switch is activated After all people have been embarked
When lowering a boat with gravity davits, it will be pulled into the embarkation deck by the . falls tricing pendants frapping lines boat hooks
Which sequence is correct when launching a lifeboat stowed in gravity davits? Release gripes, turn on emergency disconnect switch, release frapping lines Release tricing pennants, turn on emergency disconnect switch, release frapping lines Operate limit switches, release gripes, lift brake Release gripes, lift brake, release tricing pennants
Upon hearing the abandon ship signal, you put on your life jacket and report to your station. After the cover is removed you board your open lifeboat. The FIRST thing to do is to release the gripes release tricing pendants put the cap on the drain lift the brake handle
In rough weather, when a ship is able to maneuver, it is best to launch a lifeboat . on the lee side on the windward side with the wind dead ahead with the wind from astern
Prior to lowering the lifeboat, the most important item to check is the oars sail boat plug life preservers
When lowering lifeboats in heavy seas, a good practice is to rig frapping lines . on only the forward falls on only the after falls with a lead of about 45 degrees to the boat from the falls to the main deck of the vessel
When launching a lifeboat, frapping lines should be rigged . before the gripes are released before the boat is moved from the davits at the embarkation deck after the boat is in the water
As shown, a frapping line is indicated by number . 1 2 3 4
What is the best procedure for picking up a lifeboat at sea while utilizing the lifeboat's sea painter? Place the lifeboat ahead and to windward of your vessel with the wind about broad on the bow of your ship. Place the lifeboat ahead and to leeward of your ship with the wind about broad on the bow of your ship. Place your ship to windward of the lifeboat with the wind on the quarter to allow your ship to drift down to the lifeboat. Place the lifeboat ahead and to windward of your ship with the wind about broad on the quarter of your ship.
When hoisting a boat on gravity type davits using an electric motor driven winch, the davit arms should be brought up . to their final position with the winch operating at slow speed to the bar stop, and then hand cranked to their final position until just before they make contact with the limit switch, and then hand cranked to their final position to the embarkation deck, and then hand cranked to their final position
When picking up a lifeboat at sea with way on the ship, the sea painter should be secured . well forward in the lifeboat about amidships in the lifeboat well aft in the lifeboat only after the falls have been attached
In launching a covered lifeboat, what would safely lower the lifeboat from inside the lifeboat cabin? Frapping line Tricing line Rottmer release Winch remote control wire
Which item is of the most use in getting a lifeboat away from a moving vessel? The falls Sea Painter Fleming Gear Boat Hook
The sea painter of a lifeboat should be led . forward and outside of all obstructions forward and inside of all obstructions up and down from the main deck to the foremost point on the ship
Which statement is TRUE concerning lifeboat gripes? They must be released by freeing a safety shackle. They should not be released until the boat is in lowering position. They may be adjusted by a turnbuckle. They are normally used only with radial davits.
You operate the lever shown when the lifeboat is . in the secured position at the embarkation deck being lowered to sea level waterborne
When in command of a lifeboat under oars, the command "Backwater" means to . lift oars to vertical position, trim blades fore and aft with handles resting on footings complete the stroke, come to "Oars", raise oars smartly to vertical, rest handles on footing, trim blades fore and aft row in astern motion complete stroke, stop rowing, dip blade about halfway into water, hold water to stop the way on the boat
If the steersman of your lifeboat gives the command "Way enough", you should . complete the stroke, hold your oar out from the boat and level with the water dip the blade of your oar into the water and leave it there lift your oar to a vertical position complete the stroke, raise your oar slightly, swing it forward, and place it in the boat
The command "Oars" means to lift the oars to a vertical position complete the stroke and bring the oars horizontal, blades feathered place the oars in the boat with blades forward place the oars in the rowlocks directly from the boated position
The boat command that means complete the stroke and level the oars horizontally with the blades trimmed fore and aft is . "Oars" "Up oars" "Way enough" "Hold water"
If the coxswain of your lifeboat gives the command "Hold water" you should complete the stroke, raise your oar slightly, swinging the oar slightly forward, and place it in the boat lift the oar in a vertical position complete the stroke and hold the oar out of the water dip the blade of your oar into the water vertically and hold it perpendicular to the keel line
When landing a lifeboat through heavy surf with a strong current running parallel to the beach (from right to left when facing from seaward) the recommended procedure is to approach while coming to the left to take advantage of the current drop an anchor outside the surf line, then pay out anchor line over the bow while the seas carry the boat toward the beach approach slow enough so that the boat can be brought around to meet breaking seas on the bow rig a drogue with tripping line over the bow, back ashore with drogue tripped between breakers
If you must land on a beach with an oar-propelled lifeboat through a heavy surf, the recommended method is to . keep the bow directly in toward the beach, and tow the sea anchor off the stern ride in on the back of a large breaker keep the bow into the seas with the sea anchor out over the bow, and row to meet the breaking waves head directly into the beach by staying between the crests of the waves
You have abandoned ship and find yourself aboard a lifeboat in a heavy sea. Your boat is able to make way through the water. To prevent broaching, you should . put the sea on your stern and run as fast as the boat will go take no action to prevent broaching as this is a recommended maneuver in a heavy sea head the boat into the swells to take them at a 30 to 40 degree angle on either bow and run as slow as possible without losing steerage place everyone as far forward in the boat as possible to keep the bow heavy
In heavy seas the helmsman should steer the motor lifeboat . into the seas broadside to the seas in the same direction as the seas in a series of figure-eights
Steering a motor lifeboat broadside to the sea could cause it to capsize run smoother run faster sink
When backing a motor propelled lifeboat (right-hand propeller) with the rudder amidships, the stern will back straight to port to starboard None of the above
How should signal flares be used after you have abandoned ship and are adrift in a liferaft? Immediately use all the signals at once. Use all the signals during the first night. Employ a signal every hour after abandoning ship until they are gone. Use them only when you are aware of a ship or plane in the area.
When should you use distress flares and rockets? Only when there is a chance of their being seen by rescue vessels At half-hour intervals At one-hour intervals Immediately upon abandoning the vessel
When using a hand held smoke signal from a lifeboat, you should activate the signal . on the downwind side on the upwind side inside the boat at the stern
Which item of lifeboat equipment would be most suitable for night signaling to a ship on the horizon? A red parachute flare A red hand-held flare A flashlight A lantern
The painter which is to be attached to the thwart of a lifeboat should be fitted at the end with an approved safety shackle have a long eye splice at the end, and a shackle and pin should be attached to the painter with a lanyard have a long eye splice at the end, and a hardwood toggle should be attached to the thwart with a lanyard be fitted with a swivel and quickreleasing pelican hook
The sea painter is secured in the lifeboat by . a turn around a forward thwart with a toggle pin thru the eye a knot around a thwart an eye splice placed over one of the hooks of the releasing gear All of the above
What is the required minimum length of the painter for a lifeboat in ocean service? 60 fathoms the distance from the main deck to the light waterline twice the distance from the main deck to the light waterline or 50 feet whichever is greater two times the distance from the boat deck to the light waterline or 50 feet whichever is greater
The sea painter of a lifeboat should be secured . to the bow of the lifeboat to an inboard thwart in the forward one-third of the boat as close as possible to amidships of the lifeboat anywhere along the inboard side of the boat
This illustration shows the correct method of securing a . man-rope frapping line sea painter lifeline
When using the lifeboat compass, you must be careful to . set it on the centerline of the boat apply the correction for compass error keep metal objects away from it All of the above
In an open lifeboat, the lifeboat compass is usually . placed in a fixed bracket when being used clamped to any position convenient for the coxswain to see it permanently mounted on the lifeboat's centerline mounted in the center of the boat to eliminate deviation
Lifeboat hatchets should be kept in a locker secured at each end of the boat with a lanyard kept next to the boat coxswain kept in the emergency locker on the ship and brought to the lifeboat when needed
Which visual distress signal is acceptable for daylight use only? Hand-held red flare Self-contained rocket-propelled parachute red flare Hand-held orange smoke distress flare Red aerial pyrotechnic flare
Who should inspect and test an inflatable liferaft? The person in charge An approved servicing facility Shipyard personnel A certificated lifeboatman
According to the regulations, the capacity of a liferaft is required to be marked . on the Muster List ("Station Bill") at the liferaft stowage location on the Certificate of Inspection in the Operations Manual
What prevents an inflated liferaft from being pulled under by a vessel which sinks in water over 100 feet in depth? The hydrostatic release Nothing A Rottmer release The weak link in the painter line
An inflatable liferaft can be launched by . the float-free method ONLY breaking the weak link on the painter throwing the entire container overboard and then pulling on the operating cord to inflate the raft removing the securing straps
As a vessel sinks to a depth of 15 feet, the hydrostatic trip releases the liferaft container from its cradle by breaking the weak link releasing the tiedown strap pulling the operating cord releasing the CO2 canister
An inflatable liferaft is hand-launched by . pulling a cord cutting the wire restraining bands removing the rubber packing strip throwing the entire container overboard
After you have thrown the liferaft and stowage container into the water, you inflate the liferaft by . pulling on the painter line forcing open the container which operates the CO2 hitting the hydrostatic release using the hand pump provided
If an inflatable liferaft is to be released manually, where should the operating cord be attached before throwing the raft overboard? Do not attach the cord to anything but throw it overboard with the raft container. Attach the cord to a fixed object on the ship. You should stand on the cord. Attach the cord to the special pad eye on the "raft davit launcher".
Which operation should be done when launching an inflatable liferaft by hand? Open the liferaft casing. Turn the valve on the CO2 cylinder to start inflation. Make sure the operating cord is secured to the vessel before throwing it over the side. After inflation, detach operating cord from liferaft.
To release the davit cable of a davit launched liferaft, you must pull the release lanyard pull the hydraulic release push the release button pull on the ratchet handle
An inflatable liferaft is thrown into the water from a sinking vessel. What should occur after the painter trips the CO2 bottles to inflate the raft? The sea anchor should be deployed as soon you are away from the vessel. The floor will automatically inflate. If upside down, the craft will right itself. The painter will detach from the raft.
When launching an inflatable liferaft, you should make sure that the operating cord is . fastened to some substantial part of the vessel not fastened to anything secured to the hydrostatic release fastened to the raft container
An inflatable liferaft is floating in its container, attached to the ship by its painter, as the ship is sinking rapidly. Which action should be taken with respect to the liferaft container? Cut the painter line so that it will not pull the liferaft container down. Swim away from the container so that you will not be in danger as it goes down. Take no action as the pull on the painter will cause the liferaft to inflate and open the container. Manually open the container and inflate the liferaft with the hand pump.
After a liferaft is launched, the ooeratina cord . serves as a sea painter detaches automatically is used to rig the boarding ladder is cut immediately as it is of no further use
After having thrown the liferaft and stowage container into the water, the liferaft is inflated by . pulling on the painter line forcing open the container which operates the CO2 hitting the hydrostatic release using the hand pump provided
The most important thing to remember when launching an inflatable liferaft by hand is to open the CO2 inflation valve open the raft container ensure that the operating cord is secured to the vessel inflate the raft on the vessel, then lower it over the side
To launch a liferaft by hand, you should . cut the casing bands, throw the raft over the side and it will inflate by itself detach the operating cord, throw the liferaft over the side and it will then inflate cut the casing bands, throw the raft over the side and pull the operating cord throw the liferaft over the side and pull the operating cord
An inflatable liferaft is thrown into the water from a sinking vessel. Which action occurs automatically after the painter trips the CO2 bottles to inflate the raft? The sea anchor is deployed. The floor inflates. If upside down, the raft will right itself. The painter detaches from the raft.
The instructions for the launching of lifeboats and liferafts must be approved by the . lease operator Minerals Management Service Coast Guard person-in-charge of the unit
In good weather, you should deploy the sea anchor from the liferaft to keep the liferaft from capsizing navigate against the current keep personnel from getting seasick stay in the general location
An inflatable liferaft can be launched by . the float free method only kicking the hydrostatic release throwing the entire container overboard, then pulling on the operating cord to inflate the raft removing the securing straps
Which statement is TRUE concerning an inflatable liferaft? The floor may be inflated for insulation from cold water. Crew members may jump into the raft without damaging it. The raft may be boarded before it is fully inflated. All of the above
The sea painter of an inflatable liferaft should be .